Journal of the American College of Cardiology

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 0735-1097 / 1558-3597
Published by: Elsevier BV (10.1016)
Total articles ≅ 100,060
Current Coverage
SCOPUS
SCIE
LOCKSS
MEDICUS
MEDLINE
PUBMED
Archived in
EBSCO
SHERPA/ROMEO
Filter:

Latest articles in this journal

Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Volume 78; doi:10.1016/s0735-1097(21)05408-5

, Bertram Pitt
Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Volume 78, pp 344-347; doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2021.05.027

Abstract:
Download : Download high-res image (177KB)Download : Download full-size image
, Lili Zhang, Tomas G. Neilan
Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Volume 78, pp 417-418; doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2021.05.019

, Chantal Brisson, Denis Talbot, Mahée Gilbert-Ouimet, Alain Milot
Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Volume 78; doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2021.05.025

Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Volume 78, pp 327-329; doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2021.05.023

Abstract:
Download : Download high-res image (139KB)Download : Download full-size image
, Giovanni Camastra, Federica Ciolina, Massimiliano Danti, Luca Cacciotti
Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Volume 78, pp 416-417; doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2021.04.095

Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Volume 78, pp 230-233; doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2021.05.016

Abstract:
Download : Download high-res image (65KB)Download : Download full-size image
, Axel C. Diederichsen, Flemming H. Steffensen, Lars Frost, Jess Lambrechtsen, Martin Busk, Grazina Urbonaviciene, Kenneth Egstrup, Marek Karon, Lars M. Rasmussen, et al.
Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Volume 78, pp 201-211; doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2021.04.094

Abstract:
Aortic dilations (ectasias and aneurysms) may occur on any segment of the aorta. Pathogenesis varies between locations, suggesting that etiology and risk factors may differ. Despite this discrepancy, guidelines recommend screening of the whole aorta if 1 segmental dilation is discovered. The purpose of this study was to determine the most dominant predictors for dilations at the ascending, arch, descending, and abdominal part of the aorta, and to establish comprehensive risk factor profiles for each aortic segment. Individuals aged 60-74 years were randomly selected to participate in DANCAVAS I+II (Danish Cardiovascular Multicenter Screening Trials). Participants underwent cardiovascular risk assessments, including blood samples, blood pressure readings, medical records, and noncontrast computed tomography scans. Adjusted odds ratios for potential risk factors of dilations were estimated by multivariate logistic analyses. The study population consisted of 14,989 participants (14,235 men, 754 women) with an average age of 68 ± 4 years. The highest adjusted odd ratios for having any aortic dilation were observed when coexisting aortic dilations were present. Other noteworthy predictors included coexisting iliac dilations, hypertension, increasing body surface area, male sex, familial disposition, and atrial fibrillation, which were present in various combinations for the different aortic parts. Smoking and acute myocardial infarction were inversely associated with ascending and abdominal dilations. Diabetes was a shared protective factor. Risk factors differ for aortic dilations between locations. The most dominant predictor for having a dilation at any aortic segment is the presence of an aortic dilation elsewhere. This supports current guidelines when recommending a full screening of the aorta if a focal aortic dilation is discovered.
, Joshua Beckman
Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Volume 78, pp 212-215; doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2021.05.018

Abstract:
Download : Download high-res image (48KB)Download : Download full-size image
, Stanley G. Rockson, Daniel Burkhoff
Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Volume 78, pp 278-290; doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2021.05.021

Abstract:
The removal of interstitial fluid from the tissues is performed exclusively by the lymphatic system. Tissue edema in congestive heart failure occurs only when the lymphatic system fails or is overrun by fluid leaving the vascular space across the wall of the capillaries into the interstitial space. This process is driven by Starling forces determined by hydrostatic and osmotic pressures and organ-specific capillary permeabilities to proteins of different sizes. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of the generation of lymph in different organs, the mechanics by which lymph is returned to the circulation, and the consequences of the inadequacy of lymph flow. We review recent advances in imaging techniques that have allowed for new research, diagnostic, and therapeutic approaches to the lymphatic system. Finally, we review how efforts to increase lymph flow have demonstrated potential as a viable therapeutic approach for refractory heart failure.
Back to Top Top