Journal of the American College of Cardiology

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 07351097 / 15583597
Current Publisher: Elsevier BV (10.1016)
Total articles ≅ 86,474
Google Scholar h5-index: 180
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Latest articles in this journal

Gregg W. Stone
Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Volume 76, pp 1407-1409; doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2020.08.005

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Maneesh Sud, Lu Han, Maria Koh, Husam Abdel-Qadir, Peter C. Austin, Michael E. Farkouh, Lucas C. Godoy, Patrick R. Lawler, Jacob A. Udell, Harindra C. Wijeysundera, et al.
Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Volume 76, pp 1440-1450; doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2020.07.033

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Aniruddha Singh, Shilpi Mittal, Mohammed Kazimuddin
Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Volume 76; doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2020.06.084

Sameed Ahmed M. Khatana, E. Wilson Grandin, J. Eduardo Rame, Changyu Shen, Robert W. Yeh, Peter W. Groeneveld
Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Volume 76, pp 1501-1502; doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2020.07.046

Navin Suthahar, Emily S. Lau, Michael J. Blaha, Samantha M. Paniagua, Martin G. Larson, Bruce M. Psaty, Emelia J. Benjamin, Matthew A. Allison, Traci M. Bartz, James L. Januzzi, et al.
Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Volume 76, pp 1455-1465; doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2020.07.044

Abstract:
Whether cardiovascular (CV) disease risk factors and biomarkers associate differentially with heart failure (HF) risk in men and women is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate sex-specific associations of CV risk factors and biomarkers with incident HF. The analysis was performed using data from 4 community-based cohorts with 12.5 years of follow-up. Participants (recruited between 1989 and 2002) were free of HF at baseline. Biomarker measurements included natriuretic peptides, cardiac troponins, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, D-dimer, fibrinogen, C-reactive protein, sST2, galectin-3, cystatin-C, and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Among 22,756 participants (mean age 60 ± 13 years, 53% women), HF occurred in 2,095 participants (47% women). Age, smoking, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, body mass index, atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction, left ventricular hypertrophy, and left bundle branch block were strongly associated with HF in both sexes (p < 0.001), and the combined clinical model had good discrimination in men (C-statistic = 0.80) and in women (C-statistic = 0.83). The majority of biomarkers were strongly and similarly associated with HF in both sexes. The clinical model improved modestly after adding natriuretic peptides in men (ΔC-statistic = 0.006; likelihood ratio chi-square = 146; p < 0.001), and after adding cardiac troponins in women (ΔC-statistic = 0.003; likelihood ratio chi-square = 73; p < 0.001). CV risk factors are strongly and similarly associated with incident HF in both sexes, highlighting the similar importance of risk factor control in reducing HF risk in the community. There are subtle sex-related differences in the predictive value of individual biomarkers, but the overall improvement in HF risk estimation when included in a clinical HF risk prediction model is limited in both sexes.
Benjamin Z. Galper, Andrew M. Goldsweig, Deepak L. Bhatt
Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Volume 76, pp 1422-1424; doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2020.08.015

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Davide Capodanno, Marie-Claude Morice, Dominick J. Angiolillo, Deepak L. Bhatt, Robert A. Byrne, Roisin Colleran, Thomas Cuisset, Donald Cutlip, Pedro Eerdmans, John Eikelboom, et al.
Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Volume 76, pp 1468-1483; doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2020.06.085

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Volume 76; doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2020.08.010

SangWoo Park, Jung-Min Ahn, Tae Oh Kim, Hanbit Park, Do-Yoon Kang, Pil Hyung Lee, Yeong Jin Jeong, Junho Hyun, Junghoon Lee, Ju Hyeon Kim, et al.
Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Volume 76, pp 1395-1406; doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2020.07.047

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
James H. O’Keefe, Noel Torres-Acosta, Evan L. O’Keefe, Ibrahim M. Saeed, Carl J. Lavie, Sarah E. Smith, Emilio Ros
Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Volume 76, pp 1484-1493; doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2020.07.049

Abstract:
As opportunistic omnivores, humans are evolutionarily adapted to obtain calories and nutrients from both plant and animal food sources. Today, many people overconsume animal products, often-processed meats high in saturated fats and chemical additives. Alternatively, strict veganism can cause nutritional deficiencies and predispose to osteopenia, sarcopenia, and anemia. A logical compromise is a plant-rich diet with fish/seafood as principal sources of animal food. This paper reviews cumulative evidence regarding diet and health, incorporating data from landmark clinical trials of the Mediterranean diet and recommendations from recent authoritative guidelines, to support the hypothesis that a Pesco-Mediterranean diet is ideal for optimizing cardiovascular health. The foundation of this diet is vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, legumes, whole grains, and extra-virgin olive oil with fish/seafood and fermented dairy products. Beverages of choice are water, coffee, and tea. Time-restricted eating is recommended, whereby intermittent fasting is done for 12 to 16 h each day.
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