Journal of Economic Entomology

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 00220493 / 1938291X
Current Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP) (10.1093)
Former Publisher: Entomological Society of America (10.1603)
Total articles ≅ 34,641
Google Scholar h5-index: 35
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Latest articles in this journal

Sabita Ranabhat, Changlu Wang
Journal of Economic Entomology; doi:10.1093/jee/toaa122

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
E P De Sousa Neto, J De A Mendes, R M C Filgueiras, D B Lima, R N C Guedes, J W S Melo
Journal of Economic Entomology; doi:10.1093/jee/toaa101

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Miriam Bixby, Shelley E Hoover, Robyn McCallum, Abdullah Ibrahim, Lynae Ovinge, Sawyer Olmstead, Stephen F Pernal, Amro Zayed, Leonard J Foster, M Marta Guarna
Journal of Economic Entomology; doi:10.1093/jee/toaa102

Abstract:
The decline in managed honey bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colony health worldwide has had a significant impact on the beekeeping industry. To mitigate colony losses, beekeepers in Canada and around the world introduce queens into replacement colonies; however, Canada’s short queen rearing season has historically limited the production of early season queens. As a result, Canadian beekeepers rely on the importation of foreign bees, particularly queens from warmer climates. Importing a large proportion of (often mal-adapted) queens each year creates a dependency on foreign bee sources, putting beekeeping, and pollination sectors at risk in the event of border closures, transportation issues, and other restrictions as is currently happening due to the 2020 Covid-19 pandemic. Although traditional Canadian queen production is unable to fully meet early season demand, increasing domestic queen production to meet mid- and later season demand would reduce Canada’s dependency. As well, on-going studies exploring the potential for overwintering queens in Canada may offer a strategy to have early season domestic queens available. Increasing the local supply of queens could provide Canadian beekeepers, farmers, and consumers with a greater level of agricultural stability and food security. Our study is the first rigorous analysis of the economic feasibility of queen production. We present the costs of queen production for three Canadian operations over two years. Our results show that it can be profitable for a beekeeping operation in Canada to produce queen cells and mated queens and could be one viable strategy to increase the sustainability of the beekeeping industry.
Tiago Lucini, Antônio R Panizzi
Journal of Economic Entomology; doi:10.1093/jee/toaa114

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Cai-Hua Shi, Jing-Rong Hu, You-Jun Zhang
Journal of Economic Entomology; doi:10.1093/jee/toaa116

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Baiming Liu, Evan L Preisser, Xiaoguo Jiao, You-Jun Zhang
Journal of Economic Entomology; doi:10.1093/jee/toaa118

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Leyun Wang, Feng Gao, Gadi V P Reddy, Zihua Zhao
Journal of Economic Entomology; doi:10.1093/jee/toaa112

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Deanna S Scheff, James F Campbell, Frank H Arthur, Kun Yan Zhu
Journal of Economic Entomology; doi:10.1093/jee/toaa103

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Zhengyang Wang, Darong Yang, Rawal Janak, Naomi E Pierce
Journal of Economic Entomology; doi:10.1093/jee/toaa096

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Chris T McCullough, Gary L Hein, Jeffrey D Bradshaw
Journal of Economic Entomology; doi:10.1093/jee/toaa093

Abstract:
Historically, the wheat stem sawfly, Cephus cinctus Norton was a pest in spring wheat-growing regions of the northern Great Plains. However, in the 1980s, it was found infesting winter wheat fields in Montana. Infestations were first detected in western Nebraska in the 1990s, and have since spread throughout the Nebraska Panhandle. Larval damage occurs from stem-mining, but stem girdling that results in lodged stems that are not harvested results in the greatest yield losses. The biology and phenology of the wheat stem sawfly are well described in the northern portion of its range, but they are lacking in Colorado, southeast Wyoming, and Nebraska. In this study, the phenology and dispersal of the wheat stem sawfly in Nebraska winter wheat fields is described using sweep net and larval sampling. During this 2-yr study, adult activity began on May 23 and ended on June 21. Adult sex ratios were 2.32 males per female in 2014 and 0.46 males per female in 2015. Both sexes demonstrated an edge effect within the wheat fields, with greater densities near the field edge. The edge effect was stronger for male wheat stem sawfly than females. Wheat stem sawfly larval density also had an edge effect, regardless of the density of female wheat stem sawfly present. This information will be useful for developing management plans for the wheat stem sawfly in Nebraska and neighboring regions.
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