English Language Notes

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 0013-8282 / 2573-3575
Current Publisher: Duke University Press (10.1215)
Former Publisher:
Total articles ≅ 934
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AHCI
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Latest articles in this journal

Agnieszka Tuszynska
Published: 1 April 2021
English Language Notes, Volume 59, pp 38-57; doi:10.1215/00138282-8814972

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Nissa Ren Cannon
Published: 1 April 2021
English Language Notes, Volume 59, pp 133-145; doi:10.1215/00138282-8815027

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Jesse W. Schwartz
Published: 1 April 2021
English Language Notes, Volume 59, pp 12-37; doi:10.1215/00138282-8814961

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Marisa J. Fuentes
Published: 1 April 2021
English Language Notes, Volume 59, pp 229-231; doi:10.1215/00138282-8815140

Abstract:
How do we redress the ongoing violence of slavery’s archive and its effects on our present? Thinking with three recent articles that address the history of slavery and the slave trade in the Atlantic world, the following short reflection considers different approaches to contextualizing Black lives in the past and present.1 Two of the three articles, by Stephanie E. Smallwood and Saidiya Hartman, critically engage Hartman’s 2008 essay “Venus in Two Acts.”2 The third article, Simon P. Newman’s “Freedom-Seeking Slaves in England and Scotland, 1700–1780,” explores hundreds of eighteenth-century newspaper advertisements for runaway enslaved (and “servant”) men and women in England and Scotland. For vastly different audiences and to different ends, Hartman, Smallwood, and Newman contend with the erasures of enslaved people from the archives and national or imperial historiographies. Seemingly disconnected by geographies, methods, and fields, these articles, brought together in conversation, invite us to consider the state of historical research on Black lives and how to approach their erasure in the field of history.
Cherene Sherrard-Johnson
Published: 1 April 2021
English Language Notes, Volume 59, pp 225-228; doi:10.1215/00138282-8815115

Abstract:
Why acknowledge the non-event of black death?” asks Saidiya Hartman.1 In light of protests incited by the murders of George Floyd in Minneapolis; Ahmaud Arbery in Glynn County, Georgia; and Breonna Taylor in Louisville, this question resonates with urgent frequency. The events of spring 2020 throughout the United States underscored that the political platform of Black Indigenous People of Color has not changed in four hundred years. Hartman summates this platform beautifully: “the abolition of the carceral world, the abolition of capitalism . . . [and] a remaking of the social order.”2 Police brutality, strategic disenfranchisement, and state and intimate violence are all outgrowths of racial capitalism. As long as these systems persist, we remained trapped in a fatal loop that keeps us entangled with our past and continues to produce a scholarship of recovery and longing in the face of an “ever growing archive of black death.”3
Nan Goodman
Published: 1 April 2021
English Language Notes, Volume 59, pp 218-218; doi:10.1215/00138282-8815082

Abstract:
Of Note” continues with four reflections on recent scholarship about slavery and the archive. While the “Of Note” section doesn’t always coincide with or complement the special issue topic, this iteration reinforces and enhances the issue’s focus on the 2020 posthumous publication of Claude McKay’s Romance in Marseille, a novel too long missing from the American print archive.
Laura Ryan
Published: 1 April 2021
English Language Notes, Volume 59, pp 73-92; doi:10.1215/00138282-8814994

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Zainab Cheema
Published: 1 April 2021
English Language Notes, Volume 59, pp 166-180; doi:10.1215/00138282-8815049

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Gary Edward Holcomb, William J. Maxwell
Published: 1 April 2021
English Language Notes, Volume 59, pp 1-11; doi:10.1215/00138282-8814950

Abstract:
In February 2020 Penguin Classics published the Harlem Renaissance author Claude McKay’s Romance in Marseille, a novel that had idled in an archive for nearly ninety years.1 We believe that the debut of this work of fiction, until recently effectively unknown, may stimulate several critical areas, not only Harlem Renaissance studies but also dialogues across queer, disability, feminist, Marxist, postcolonial, Afro-Orientalist, Black Atlantic, and transatlantic modernist scholarship. As we hope the reader of this special issue will see, McKay’s circa 1929–33 text also offers a fecund analytic subject to critics working in Afropessimisim, primitivism, reparations, and surveillance, as well as such emergent approaches as maritime modernism and the politics of pleasure.
Stephanie J. Brown
Published: 1 April 2021
English Language Notes, Volume 59, pp 93-108; doi:10.1215/00138282-8815005

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