Applied Veterinary Research

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ISSN / EISSN : 2764-4820 / 2764-4820
Total articles ≅ 15
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Gh Rasool Bhat, , Pawanpreet Singh, Nahida Yousuf, Masrat Un Nisa, Jalal U Din Parrah
Applied Veterinary Research, Volume 1, pp 1-2; https://doi.org/10.31893/avr.2022006

Abstract:
Prepartum prolapse of vagina or vagina along with cervix is an obstetrical emergency arising as a result of number of factors, the most common being hormonal imbalances. Chronic cervicovaginal prolapse may have a genetic trend. In this report we received an emergency at our university referral hospital with a history of recurrent prolapse mass appearing through vulva during a late gestation in a cow. Prolapse mass was reduced, reposed and retained under epidural anesthesia. All the lacerations were sutured with catgut and Buhner’s suture, using infusion set, was applied on vulvar commissures for a period of 10 days. Also, the supportive therapy was advised. The present clinical article reports successful management of chronic recurrent pre-partum prolapse with lacerations in a cow.
Alexandre Antonio Pasqualini, Valter Arthur, Michelen Barbosa Schiavolin, Marina Rodrigues de Abreu, Maria Izabel Camargo-Mathias
Applied Veterinary Research, Volume 1, pp 1-2; https://doi.org/10.31893/avr.2022007

Kenneth Ewere Ogbein, Abraham Goni Dogo, David Omagbe Oshadu, Emmanuel Richard Edeh
Applied Veterinary Research, Volume 1, pp 1-11; https://doi.org/10.31893/avr.2022010

Abstract:
There are several socio-economic constraints facing horses in Jos, Nigeria among which gastrointestinal parasites (GIPs) play important role in negatively impacting the health, productivity and well-being of horses and these greatly limits the efficiency and work potential of affected horses. The objectives of this study are to estimate the impact of GIP infection in Horses around Jos metropolis and to advise stakeholders appropriately. Faecal samples were collected from 108 horses comprising of 25 male horses and 83 female horses over a period of six months from February to July 2021 covering three months in the dry season and three months in the rainy season. The samples were analyzed for GIPs using standard flotation, sedimentation and McMaster faecal egg counting techniques. The overall prevalence of GIPs in this study was 82.41% out of which 51.85% were positive for single infection and 30.56% were positive for mixed infection. The GIPs found in this study were Strongylus spp., Strongyloideswesteri, Trichonema spp., Eimeria leukarti, Anoplocephala spp., Fasciola gigantica, Parascaris equorum, Gastrodiscus aegypticus, Triodontophorus spp., Oxyuris equi, Gasterophilus intestinalis and Dictyocaulus arnfieldi. The prevalence for EPG was zero (3.70%), low (46.30%), medium (24.07%) and high (9.26%). The prevalence of GIPs was found higher in males as compared to females; young ones as compared to adults and rainy season compared to dry season. The prevalence of GIPs was found higher in animals with poor body condition score (84.62%) followed by moderate (83.78%), ideal (76.92%) and fat (66.67%). Several factors such as poor nutrition, management practices, disease status and other physiologic factors may affect the immune status of horses making it easier for them to succumb to gastrointestinal parasitic infection. It is therefore recommended that appropriate, economic and efficient control measures be employed to reduce parasitism in all age groups, sex and body conditions and in all seasons of the year consequently improving the health of horses in Jos - Nigeria.
Ahmed Abdelkader Saleh, Mohammed Hassan Hammoud, Nasraa Ali Dabour, , Mahmoud Abdelalim Sharaby
Applied Veterinary Research, Volume 1, pp 1-13; https://doi.org/10.31893/avr.2022012

Abstract:
The polymorphisms in Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and Growth Hormone (GH) have an effect on mammalian growth control, development and reproduction activity. This investigation aimed to study the polymorphism in IGFBP-3 and GH genes, and detect their association with body weights and growth performance of several sheep breeds (Ovis aries) namely; Rahmani, Barki, Rahmani x Barki cross, Awassi/Awassi x Suffolk cross and Ossimi. Digestion of 654 bp for IGFBP-3/HaeIII yielded only one restriction pattern of 8 fragments in all studied breeds revealing the absence of polymorphism and this agrees with gene sequencing. While, sequencing analysis of the amplified fragment of GH gene revealed polymorphism in nucleotide sequencing. 4 SNPs out of 11 (C1776G, T1772A, G1769C and C1765A) in Rahmani, while 1 SNPs out of 2 (A1544G) in Barki, whilst 3 SNPs out of 4 (A1678G, A1558G and A1544G) in Rahmani x Barki cross, whereas 2 SNPs out of 4 (C1765A and G1550A) in Awassi /Awassi x Suffolk cross and 3 SNPs out of 8 (T1772A, G1769C and G1756C) in Ossimi were very important. The amino acid sequence for GH gene of Rahmani was different from those of other breeds in 4 amino acids, while, each of Rahmani x Barki cross and Ossimi amino acid sequences were different in 3 amino acids. The current results suggest that body weights and growth performance of tested sheep breeds at different stages of growth are statistically affected by GH gene which could be considered as a candidate gene for growth in breeding programs.
Nadia Mildred D’Souza, Gunda Sai Rakesh, Siddhartha Sankar Das, Mathivathani Cattavarayane, Angeline Felicia Bora Christopher
Applied Veterinary Research, Volume 1, pp 1-5; https://doi.org/10.31893/avr.2022015

Abstract:
Enteric parasites of Japanese quails were investigated in 4 different farms in a hot and humid tropical environment of Puducherry in southern India. Samples were collected from the gastrointestinal tracts of freshly slaughtered birds from the local poultry slaughter shops and were screened for the presence of endoparasites. Faecal samples were processed by floatation (saturated salt solution) and sedimentation methods. Out of 60 faecal samples examined, 22 (36,66%) were positive for gastrointestinal parasites. During the investigation, one cestode was found in gross in the small intestine of the quail. The faecal examination revealed eggs of Ascaridia spp., Capillaria spp., and the oocyst of Eimeria spp. Out of 15 intestinal scrapings examined, 8 (53.33%) scrapings were positive for intestinal coccidiosis, and the remaining 7 (46.66%) were positive for caecal coccidiosis. It was found that most of the nematodes and protozoan parasites were more prevalent in the young age group than in the adult age group of quails. The study aimed to aid in controlling parasitic infections in quail farms by regularly combining management and adequate therapy with efficient anthelminthic.
Sai Rakesh Gunda, Nadia Mildred D'Souza, Siddhartha Sankar Das, Mathivathani Cattavarayane, Angeline Felicia Bora Christopher
Applied Veterinary Research, Volume 1, pp 1-6; https://doi.org/10.31893/avr.2022013

Abstract:
A survey was carried out to evaluate the incidence of gastrointestinal parasites in indigenous(desi) fowl in southern India's hot, humid tropical region of Puducherry. A total of sixty gastrointestinal tracts (GIT) desi fowl were collected from different retail chicken shops. The GIT was cut open and screened for the presence of any parasites. The faecal sample was collected and examined by direct microscopy, floatation, and sedimentation technique for the presence of parasitic ova, oocysts, etc. The overall incidence of GI parasites in desi fowl was 76.66%. The parasites commonly encountered were Ascaridia spp. (20%), Capillaria spp. (11.66%), Strongyloides spp. (1.66%) in nematodes (33.33%), Raillietina spp. (10%) in cestodes (10%), Eimeria spp. (33.33%) in protozoa, and mixed infection of 16.66%. Thus, results indicated a high prevalence of GI parasites in desi fowl, emphasizing the need to develop a strategic control programme and improve management practices of backyard poultry.
, Annisa Putri Aulia, Ris Raihan Felim, Lisawati Susanto, Yulhasri Yulhasri
Applied Veterinary Research, Volume 1, pp 1-2; https://doi.org/10.31893/avr.2022011

Abstract:
Bancroftian filariasis is a vector-borne disease transmitted by the Culex quinquefasciatus. Heavy and long-term use of insecticides causes the development of insecticide resistance in Cx. quinquefasciatus. However, there has been no research on resistance mechanisms through detoxifying enzyme activity in Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes exposed to lambda-cyhalothrin in Jakarta. This study aimed to determine the larvicidal activity of lambda-cyhalothrin against Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae and the larvicidal mechanism through detoxifying enzyme activity. Bioassay tests were performed by exposing Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae to five concentrations of lambda-cyhalothrin (0.002; 0.015; 0.05; 0.2; 0.7 ppm). The mortality rate was measured after 24 h of exposure. The detoxifying enzyme activity, including acetylcholinesterase (AChE), glutathione s-transferase (GST), and cytochrome c-oxidase (COX), was analyzed using the biochemical method. Lambda-cyhalothrin (0.7 ppm) showed 100% mortality of Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae. LC50 dan LC90 values were 0.054 and 0.148 ppm, respectively. Lambda-cyhalothrin non-significantly increased AChE activity (P > 0.05), significantly increased GST activity (P < 0.05), and non-significantly decreased COX activity (P > 0.05). Lambda-cyhalothrin is still effective in killing Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae by influencing detoxification enzymes.
, André Luis Do Valle De Zoppa
Applied Veterinary Research, Volume 1, pp 1-2; https://doi.org/10.31893/avr.2022008

Abstract:
The use of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) as a diagnostic tool for pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID) in horses is the subject of numerous scientific research, and two systematic reviews were identified, addressing precisely this topic. This is a rare and curious fact in the veterinary literature, as it allows us to analyze how two groups of independent researchers approached the same problem. This short review aims to carry out a qualitative comparative analysis of these two articles to identify the perception of two different research groups about the effectiveness of ACTH as a diagnostic tool for PPID in horses.
Concepta McManus, Helder Louvandini, Potira Hermuche, Renato Guimarães, Osmar Abilio De Carvalho Junior, Felipe Pimentel, Daniel Pimentel, Samuel Paiva, Vanessa Peripolli
Applied Veterinary Research, Volume 1, pp 1-2; https://doi.org/10.31893/avr.2022009

Abstract:
The use of georeferencing technologies and genetic information has increased to integrate management and planning of livestock production systems, predict adaptive capacities, and aid in developing strategies for national Animal Genetic Resource Conservation Programs. Researchers and farmers can use this information to define conservation objectives for individual breeds and examine environmental factors that affect extinction risk, such as disease threats. Molecular markers and geographic information come together in landscape genetics, a combination of landscape ecology and population genetics, to provide information on the interaction between landscape and evolutionary processes. Results reveal attributes that affect genetic adaptation to specific environmental stressors such as diseases, parasites, extreme heat, vegetation type, lack of water, or combinations. Recent preliminary studies in Brazil used these tools to identify the regional usage patterns for animal production based on environmental criteria and breed distribution data. The results have been used as a further criterion to optimise in situ, and ex situ conservation schemes and plan expansion and adaptation of production systems. The use of production environment descriptors and climatic and genetic information will help maintain animal production systems in a changing world.
, Maksym Belozor, Pavlo Skliarov, ,
Applied Veterinary Research, Volume 1, pp 1-4; https://doi.org/10.31893/avr.2022017

Abstract:
Migrating grass awns are a common problem in dogs with a vegetative foreign body during the summer, requiring surgical intervention. This report presents treatment cases of migrating grass awns in four client-owned dogs (between the webs of the toes, in the cheek, abdomen area, and in the penis). Under ultrasonographic visualization, vegetative foreign bodies were localized, confirmed upon surgery, and removed with a positive outcome.
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