Critical Care Nurse

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 0279-5442 / 1940-8250
Current Publisher: AACN Publishing (10.4037)
Total articles ≅ 915
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Latest articles in this journal

PhD Peter Nydahl, PhD Ingrid Egerod, Megan M. Hosey, Md Dale M. Needham, Christina Jones, Md O. Joseph (Joe) Bienvenu
Published: 1 October 2020
Critical Care Nurse, Volume 40; doi:10.4037/ccn2020958

Abstract:
Topic Many patients in intensive care units have frightening experiences and memories and subsequent post–intensive care syndrome, with psychiatric morbidity including depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Intensive care unit diaries, written by staff members and families, support patients’ understanding of what occurred and may alleviate their psychological suffering. Clinical Relevance An increasing number of critical care nurses in the United States and elsewhere are implementing intensive care unit diaries, but implementation remains challenging. Purpose To address emerging questions and support implementation in the United States, we held the Third International Intensive Care Unit Diary Conference as a 1-day preconference during the Seventh Annual Johns Hopkins Critical Care Rehabilitation Conference on November 1, 2018, in Baltimore, Maryland. This article summarizes the conference. Content Covered Conference presentations included intensive care unit–related experiences of patients and families, psychosocial aspects of post–intensive care syndrome, the evolution of diaries, implementation strategies for intensive care unit diaries, special topics (eg, legal issues, electronic vs handwritten diaries, pediatric diaries, and time of handover), and psychosocial recovery.
Msn Julie Rogan, PharmD Megan Zielke, Msn Kelly Drumright, PhD Leanne M. Boehm
Published: 1 October 2020
Critical Care Nurse, Volume 40, pp 47-56; doi:10.4037/ccn2020111

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Msn Brandee Pak
Published: 1 October 2020
Critical Care Nurse, Volume 40, pp 80-81; doi:10.4037/ccn2020966

Published: 1 October 2020
Critical Care Nurse, Volume 40, pp 84-84; doi:10.4037/ccn2020615

Md Taylor A. Kobussen, Md Gregory Hansen, Bsn Rebecca J. Brockman, Tanya R. Holt
Published: 1 October 2020
Critical Care Nurse, Volume 40; doi:10.4037/ccn2020710

Abstract:
Background Children with complex chronic conditions present unique challenges to the pediatric intensive care unit, including prolonged length of stay, complex medical regimens, and complicated family dynamics. Objectives To examine perspectives of pediatric intensive care unit health care providers regarding pediatric patients with complex chronic conditions, and to explore potential opportunities to improve these patients’ care. Methods A prospective mixed-methods sequential explanatory study was conducted in a tertiary medical-surgical pediatric intensive care unit using surveys performed with REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture) followed by semistructured interviews. Results The survey response rate was 70.6% (77 of 109). Perspectives of health care providers did not vary with duration of work experience. Ten semistructured interviews were conducted. Eight overarching themes emerged from the interviews: (1) the desire for increased formal education specific to pediatric complex chronic care patients; (2) designation of a primary intensivist; (3) modifying delivery of care to include a discrete location for care provision; (4) establishing daily, short-term, and long-term goals; (5) monitoring and documenting care milestones; (6) strengthening patient and family communications with the health care team; (7) optimizing discharge coordination and planning; and (8) integrating families into care responsibilities. Conclusions Pediatric intensive care unit health care providers’ perspectives of pediatric patients with complex chronic conditions indicated opportunities to refine the care provided by establishing daily goals, coordinating discharge planning, and creating occasions for close communication between patients, families, and providers.
Bsn Hannah Nakashima, PhD Cara Gallegos
Published: 1 October 2020
Critical Care Nurse, Volume 40, pp 26-37; doi:10.4037/ccn2020293

Abstract:
Background Families experience high levels of stress during a loved one’s critical illness. Objective To provide an overview of current evidence on the use of journal writing as a coping mechanism for family members during a loved one’s critical illness in a neonatal, pediatric, or adult intensive care unit. Methods Five databases (MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, APA PsycArticles, and Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition) were searched to identify studies examining the benefits of journal writing for family members of critically ill patients. Eight eligible studies reported data from 426 relatives of critically ill patients. Results Regarding quality assessment, the quantitative studies met 73.1% of relevant quality criteria, whereas qualitative studies met 81.3%. Mixed-methods studies met 82.4% of quantitative and 55% of qualitative criteria. Various key themes were identified: communication and understanding, connection to the patient, emotional expression, creating something meaningful, and the importance of pictures and staff entries. Overall, writing in a diary seems to be beneficial for reducing psychological distress and posttraumatic stress disorder, but none of the studies found that it significantly decreased anxiety or depression. Conclusions The findings of this review suggest that having family members of critically ill patients write in a diary is a simple and cost-effective intervention that may improve their psychological outcomes. Critical care nurses are in a position to educate families about the potential benefits of writing in a diary. Future research would be valuable regarding the benefits of using a diary and an optimal approach for doing so in this population.
Published: 1 October 2020
Critical Care Nurse, Volume 40, pp 57-66; doi:10.4037/ccn2020439

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Msn Rachel E. Smith, Dnp Megan M. Shifrin
Published: 1 October 2020
Critical Care Nurse, Volume 40, pp 15-24; doi:10.4037/ccn2020746

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Sara Knippa, Jennifer Popies
Published: 1 October 2020
Critical Care Nurse, Volume 40, pp 67-71; doi:10.4037/ccn2020624

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