Alzheimer's & Dementia : Translational Research & Clinical Interventions

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Published by: Wiley-Blackwell (10.1002)
Total articles ≅ 4
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Frederick M. Lang, Daniel Y. Kwon, Dag Aarsland, Brad Boeve, Babak Tousi, Mark Harnett, Yi Mo,
Alzheimer's & Dementia : Translational Research & Clinical Interventions, Volume 7; https://doi.org/10.1002/trc2.12171

Abstract:
Introduction A phase 2b clinical trial, HEADWAY-DLB, was performed to assess treatment with intepirdine, a serotonin receptor antagonist, in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Methods HEADWAY-DLB was a multinational, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Two hundred sixty-nine DLB patients were randomized to receive placebo, 70 mg/day intepirdine, or 35 mg/day intepirdine over 24 weeks. The primary endpoint was change from baseline to week 24 on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale–Part III (UPDRS-III). Results Both intepirdine groups did not demonstrate significant benefits over placebo at 24 weeks on the UPDRS-III (35 mg/day: P = .1580, 70 mg/day: P = .6069). All other endpoints were not significant. Intepirdine was well tolerated, with a slightly higher incidence of gastrointestinal adverse events observed in the intepirdine groups versus placebo. Discussion Intepirdine treatment did not lead to improvements over placebo in patients with DLB. As one of the largest DLB studies to date, HEADWAY-DLB demonstrates that international trials for DLB are feasible within a reasonable timeframe.
, Joshua D. Grill, Jeanette Zhu, Khue Nguyen, Bora Nam, Janice Tsoh, Alka Kanaya, Quyen Vuong, Joon Bang, Nhi Cristina Y. Nguyen, et al.
Alzheimer's & Dementia : Translational Research & Clinical Interventions, Volume 7; https://doi.org/10.1002/trc2.12195

Abstract:
Introduction This study elicited Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders’ (AAPI) perspectives about recruitment strategies/messaging for participation in an aging, Alzheimer's disease and related dementias (ADRD), and caregiving research recruitment registry. Methods Using a mixed methods design, CARE (Collaborative Approach for AAPI Research and Education) conducted 14 focus groups (N = 123) with AAPI cultural groups (Asian Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Samoan, Vietnamese) in different languages. Descriptive statistics and thematic qualitative analyses were conducted. Results Mean age of participants was 54 years (median: 61; range 18–80), 66% were female, and 81% were foreign-born. Themes of consideration for recruitment emerged: (1) culturally/linguistically appropriate outreach in culturally specific spaces, (2) motivations for research participation, and (3) approaches to outreach and recruitment methods. Within each of these themes, there were ethnic differences in specific strategies/approaches reflected as subthemes. Discussion Recruitment and messaging strategies should be tailored uniquely for each targeted AAPI group, with a thorough understanding of the cultural/linguistic factors that facilitate research participation to increase AAPI participation in ADRD, aging, and caregiver-related research.
, Nanon H. M. Labrie, George O. Agogo, Joan K. Monin, Esther W. Bekker‐Grob, Janet L. Macneil Vroomen
Alzheimer's & Dementia : Translational Research & Clinical Interventions, Volume 7; https://doi.org/10.1002/trc2.12193

Abstract:
Introduction More persons with dementia are residing in the community as many countries shift from residential care to home and community care. Although there are many forms of care and support available to avoid crisis situations and prolong community living, it remains unclear how these are valued by community-dwelling persons with dementia and their informal caregivers. Understanding perspectives of persons with dementia and informal caregivers on care characteristics is a vital step in valuing care services. This study aims to prioritize care characteristics for community-dwelling persons with dementia and informal caregivers with the use of an innovative mixed-methods approach. Methods Six mixed focus groups were conducted in The Netherlands with persons with dementia (n = 23) and informal caregivers (n = 20), including a quantitative ranking exercise that prioritized seven care and support characteristics from "most important" to "least important," followed by a group discussion about the prioritization. Audio recordings were transcribed and analyzed using thematic analysis. Results The ranking exercise and discussion showed that persons with dementia favored in-home care, help with daily activities, and social activities, whereas informal caregivers favored social activities, information about dementia, navigating the health care system, and emotional support. Discussion Persons with dementia prioritized day-to-day activities, whereas informal caregivers preferred assistance with organizing care and coping with caregiving. This study created a method to capture the care preferences of persons with dementia and informal caregivers.
, Ellen Hjelmare, Bodil Weidung, Jan Olsson, Maria Josefsson, Rolf Adolfsson, Lars Nyberg, Fredrik Elgh, Hugo Lövheim
Alzheimer's & Dementia : Translational Research & Clinical Interventions, Volume 7; https://doi.org/10.1002/trc2.12187

Abstract:
Introduction In this nested case-control study, we investigated if antiviral treatment given prior to onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD) could influence incident AD. Methods From a large population-based cohort study in northern Sweden, 262 individuals that later developed AD were compared to a non-AD matched control group with respect to prescriptions of herpes antiviral treatment. All included subjects were herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) carriers and the matching criteria were age, sex, apolipoprotein E genotype (ε4 allele carriership), and study sample start year. Results Among those who developed AD, 6 prescriptions of antivirals were found, compared to 20 among matched controls. Adjusted for length of follow-up, a conditional logistic regression indicated a difference in the risk for AD development between groups (odds ratio for AD with an antiviral prescription 0.287, P = .018). Discussion Antiviral treatment might possibly reduce the risk for later development of HSV1-associated AD.
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