AJOG Global Reports

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 2666-5778 / 2666-5778
Published by: Elsevier BV (10.1016)
Total articles ≅ 26
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Sophie L. Goemans, , Ajit Kumar Yadav, Lotus McDougal, Anita Raj,
Published: 19 October 2021
Abstract:
Previous studies have shown that women who experience intimate partner violence (IPV) have higher rates of unintended pregnancy and abortion – but whether there are differences between type of abortion care accessed is unknown. Understanding the risk factors for self-managed abortion, is important for providing risk-mitigating information and resources to those at highest risk for unintended pregnancy and intimate partner violence. With access to information and medication abortion drugs, it is possible that self-managed abortion could be performed safely, increasing reproductive autonomy for women.
, Peter Kouides, Stephanie Bousquet, Paul Cabral
Published: 7 October 2021
Abstract:
Hemophagocytic lymphohystiocytosis (HLH) is an extremely life-threatening immune deregulatory syndrome. It is characterized by pathologic activation of immune cells leading to excessive cytokine production, multi-organ failure, and potentially death.
Albaro José Nieto-Calvache, José Miguel Palacios-Jaraquemada, Lina María Vergara-Galliadi, Alejandro Solo Nieto-Calvache, Maria Andrea Zambrano, Juan Manuel Burgos-Luna
Published: 7 October 2021
Abstract:
Placenta accreta spectrum (PAS) is a severe condition that requires trained interdisciplinary group participation. However, achieving that specific training is difficult without academic programs or hospitals dedicated to teaching PAS skills.
Published: 7 October 2021
Abstract:
Latin America and the Caribbean is the region with the highest prevalence of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy worldwide. In Suriname, where the stillbirth rate is the second highest in the region, it is not yet known which maternal factors contribute most significantly.
, Ms. Ashlee M Weaver, , Floor J Backes, Larry J Copeland, Kristin L Bixel, Jeffrey M Fowler, David M O'Malley,
Published: 6 October 2021
Abstract:
There is a paucity of literature regarding outcomes following vulvar excision for non-malignant lesions. This is a common procedure among gynecologists (GYN) and gynecologic oncologists (GO), and a body of evidence is warranted to guide clinical care and future research.
, Shrey Desai, Tushar Desai, Daria Szkwarko, Gayatri Desai
Published: 6 October 2021
Abstract:
Although risk factors of preterm deliveries across the world have been extensively studied, the trends and risk factors of preterm deliveries for the population of rural India, and specifically tribal women, remain unexplored.
Published: 30 September 2021
Abstract:
Almost three quarters of India's roughly 16 million annual abortions are done through medication abortion (MA) purchased from pharmacists outside of healthcare facilities. The quality of information provided by pharmacists about MA is often poor.
Sarah E. Murphy, Carol A. Johnston, Cody Strom, Christy Isler, Kelley Haven, Edward Newton, Samantha McDonald,
Published: 29 September 2021
Abstract:
Ten percent of pregnancies are complicated by a hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Previous research has shown that moderate-vigorous intensity exercise has a positive effect on maternal resting blood pressure. A research gap, however, exists related to how different types of exercise (resistance, aerobic, combined resistance and aerobic) affect maternal blood pressure. The majority of previous studies solely focused on aerobic exercise.
Geraldo Duarte, Conrado Milani Coutinho, , Silvana Maria Quintana, Ana Cláudia Rabelo e Silva, Liona C. Poon, Fabrício Da Silva Costa
Published: 3 September 2021
Abstract:
Women in the pregnancy-puerperal cycle or those who are lactating have been deliberately excluded from participating in COVID-19 vaccine clinical trials that aimed to evaluate either the efficacy in inducing the formation of neutralizing antibodies or the investigational products’ safety profile. Exclusion of pregnant and lactating women from such studies still certainly inequitably deny these women access to COVID-19 vaccines since these products’ availability became increasingly available to non-pregnant people and even during pregnancy in high-income settings. In this clinical opinion article, we discuss aspects of the prolonged pandemic, the emergence of viral variants, the risks of severe complications of COVID-19 in pregnant women, and the disproportionate impact on low- and middle-income countries. We argue that the decision to receive the COVID-19 vaccine should be a joint decision between the pregnant or lactating women and the healthcare providers while considering the available data on vaccine efficacy, safety, the risks of SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnant women, and the woman's individual risk for infection and serious illness. The various types of vaccines already in use and their safety and effectiveness, and the potential risks and benefits of their administration to pregnant or lactating women are reviewed.
, Ms Katie Barnard, Ms Mary Lynch, Ms Nashna Maharjan, Meena Thapa, Nisha Rai, Tina Lavender, Michael Larkin, , Christy Burden, et al.
Published: 29 August 2021
Abstract:
Background: Maternal and neonatal mortality rates remain high in many less economically developed countries, including Nepal. Good quality antenatal care can reduce adverse pregnancy outcomes; however, identifying how best to improve antenatal care can be challenging. Objectives: Our objective was to identify interventions for maternal or neonatal benefit that have been investigated in in the antenatal period in Nepal. We wanted to understand their scale, location, cost, and effectiveness. Study design: Online bibliographic databases (Cochrane Central, Medline, Embase, CINAHL Plus, British Nursing Index, PsycInfo, Allied and Complementary Medicine) and trial registries (ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization Clinical Trials Registry Platform) were searched from their inception until 24th May 2020. We included all studies reporting any maternal or neonatal outcome following an intervention in the antenatal period. We screened studies and extracted data in duplicate. Meta-analysis was not possible due to the heterogeneity of interventions and outcomes, so we performed a narrative synthesis of the included studies. Results: Twenty-five studies met our inclusion criteria. These studies showed a variety of approaches to improving antenatal care (e.g. educational programs, incentive schemes, micronutrient supplementation) in different settings (home, community or hospital-based) and with a wide variety of outcomes. Less than a quarter of the studies were randomized controlled trials, and many were single-site or reported only short-term outcomes. All studies reported having made a positive impact on antenatal care in some way but only three provided a cost-benefit analysis to support implementation. None of these studies focused on the most remote communities in Nepal. Conclusions: Our systematic review found good quality evidence that micronutrient supplementation and educational interventions can bring important clinical benefits. Iron folic acid supplementation significantly reduces neonatal mortality and maternal anaemia, while birth preparedness classes increase uptake of antenatal and postnatal care, increase compliance with micronutrient supplementation, and increase awareness of danger signs in pregnancy. Funding: Project funding through University of Bristol Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) and salary support from National Institute for Health and Research (NIHR).
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