Literature and Medicine

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 0278-9671 / 1080-6571
Published by: Project Muse (10.1353)
Total articles ≅ 1,026
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Latest articles in this journal

Jaipreet Virdi
Published: 1 January 2021
Literature and Medicine, Volume 39, pp 29-33; https://doi.org/10.1353/lm.2021.0004

Ajuan Mance
Published: 1 January 2021
Literature and Medicine, Volume 39, pp 18-28; https://doi.org/10.1353/lm.2021.0003

Shelley Wall
Published: 1 January 2021
Literature and Medicine, Volume 39, pp 217-218; https://doi.org/10.1353/lm.2021.0020

James Fitz Gerald
Published: 1 January 2021
Literature and Medicine, Volume 39, pp 249-272; https://doi.org/10.1353/lm.2021.0023

Abstract:
This essay explores Sinclair Lewis's Arrowsmith (1925) through the medical-ethical and ecological contingencies of U.S. tropical medicine during the early twentieth century. With an eye kept on the novel's well-known "St. Hubert " chapters, the essay queries the dangerous compromises that even the most well-intentioned medical professionals have made and can make in the name of scientific progress. The novel, I argue, organizes around and yet moves beyond the traditional outbreak narrative to unravel the various political, economic, and cultural strands of U.S. imperial medicine. The novel's platform for applied sanitary science helps me revisit famed public health campaigns, particularly those from Cuba and Panama, and draw out new ways of understanding race and place in the context of global health intervention.
Jonathan Taylor
Published: 1 January 2021
Literature and Medicine, Volume 39, pp 399-420; https://doi.org/10.1353/lm.2021.0030

Abstract:
This article challenges the view that Daniel Defoe’s A Journal of the Plague Year (1722) exploited or augmented the plague’s horrors. It demonstrates that Defoe denounced writers who sensationalized plague and explores his use of A Journal to debunk terrifying accounts of the disease published during the Plague of Marseille (1720–22). Section one explores how Defoe’s opposition to inciting fear was shaped by medical beliefs that fear increased susceptibility to disease and his observations about fear’s socioeconomic repercussions. Section two examines his conviction that “Books frighted [people] terribly” and A Journal’s attempts to discredit macabre images and tales circulated in contemporary plague writing. The conclusion addresses the relevance of Defoe’s observations in the context of modern anxiety about pandemic disease, the resonance of his conclusions with recent scholarship on the media’s augmentation of panic prior to pandemics, and the ethical questions A Journal poses for those writing about infectious diseases.
Sarah Powrie
Published: 1 January 2021
Literature and Medicine, Volume 39, pp 351-373; https://doi.org/10.1353/lm.2021.0028

Abstract:
In the Consolation of Philosophy, the philosopher Boethius represents his literary self as imprisoned literally and metaphorically. Even while he is literally incarcerated, the text argues that his psychological dependency on the benefits of wealth, power, and fame represents a graver threat to his wellbeing. The allegorical Lady Philosophy acts as Boethius's interlocutor and medical practitioner as she guides him through a therapeutic inquiry designed to make him more consciously aware of ways that his dependency undermines his autonomous selfhood. Lady Philosophy's dialectical treatment presents the modern reader with a productive therapeutic model for addiction that warrants attention at a time when addictive behaviors are on the rise and when researchers question the dominant disease model. Lady Philosophy affirms Boethius’s capacity for self-transformation. She regards his addictive habits as learned behaviors and guides him both in recognizing their latent harm and in redirecting his desire toward meaningful goals.
Shane Neilson
Published: 1 January 2021
Literature and Medicine, Volume 39, pp 193-197; https://doi.org/10.1353/lm.2021.0017

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