College & Research Libraries

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 0010-0870 / 2150-6701
Published by: American Library Association (10.5860)
Total articles ≅ 7,372
Current Coverage
SCOPUS
SSCI
INSPEC
LOCKSS
DOAJ
PUBMED
Archived in
EBSCO
SHERPA/ROMEO
Filter:

Latest articles in this journal

Natasha Jenkins
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.3.459

Abstract:
The academic library’s role in teaching and learning on campus is vital to institutional initiatives. Melissa N. Mallon drives this point home by addressing the role of the library instruction program and the instruction coordinator in nine skillfully crafted chapters. Each chapter highlights the library’s agenda for teaching and learning within the greater context of its institution. Partners in Teaching and Learning is the eighth title to be published in the Beta Phi Mu Scholars Series, which publishes titles that contribute significantly to library and information sciences. The book is written in a way that offers practical resources and strategies for a multitude of instruction programs.
Richelle Brown
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.5.771

Abstract:
Shaun Slifer had never heard of the Appalachian Movement Press (AMP) when he was handed one of its publications while attending a wedding at the Appalachian South Folklife Center (ASFC) in Pipestem, West Virginia, in 2016. Neither had almost anyone else, as its history had gone largely undocumented. Slifer, the creative director of the West Virginia Mine Wars Museum in Matewan, West Virginia, was already aware of the rich and complex ways that cultural production, social movements, and historical collections can interact. He put that knowledge to use in recovering the history of a press that played a key role during a crucial decade of organizing for justice in Appalachia. So Much to Be Angry About: Appalachian Movement Press and Radical DIY Publishing, 1969–1979 is the informative result.
Jordan Hale
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.5.778

Abstract:
“I thought you didn’t want to see another map again,” my partner joked as I held up the book I was sent to review. Indeed, that’s a sentiment I uttered more than a few times three years ago, when I graduated from library school and went on the job market after 10 years of working in a university map collection and on several historical mapping projects. It was in these roles that I learned the nuances of digitization, visualization, and time-series data structures using geographic information systems (GIS) software. Over my time in the library, I became disillusioned with a number of trends not isolated to my workplace, including the fetishization of rare materials, the elision of labor, the detached overtheorization of “the archive,” and the extensive intellectual gatekeeping meant to exclude those seen as lacking the appropriate credentials and occupational categories to produce scholarship. Indeed, I thought I’d be the right person to take on Time in Maps: From the Age of Discovery to our Digital Era, given my expertise in the production, distribution, and access of (historical) maps. However, the book’s explorations break little new ground outside the domain of histories of cartography. The digital era promised in the book’s subtitle is not a point of arrival, as suggested, but an insistence that even more study into a format and genre that has seen considerable scholarly attention for centuries is needed, with minimal ethical engagement with the conditions of the production and reproduction of paper maps.
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.1.44

Abstract:
First-generation college students have a profound impact both inside and outside the classroom on the strategic goals of universities, yet in-depth, firsthand information about their experiences are difficult for researchers and university administrators to find. Oral histories are a data-rich method of collecting narratives that legitimize the perspectives of underrepresented communities whose stories are often absent from the written record. This article provides a brief overview of first-generation populations, a review of literature relating to the increasing involvement of libraries and archives in capturing and preserving the stories of underdocumented communities in the twenty-first century, and shares three case studies of first-generation initiatives at public universities in California, Colorado, and Nebraska.
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.1.59

Abstract:
This study measured the relative academic impact of articles by LIS practitioners by analyzing library and information science articles published between 2005 and 2014. The results revealed that, although practitioners were not the main knowledge contributors, the academic impact of articles by practitioners was not significantly lower than that of articles by academics. No significant differences in academic impact were present between any two types of coauthored articles. Articles from academic–practitioner collaboration were cited earlier than articles from practitioner–practitioner and academic–academic collaborations. This study suggests that LIS practitioners appear to benefit from collaborative scholarship with LIS researchers through more citations and higher impact.
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.1.19

Abstract:
Academic libraries around the world are cancelling big deal journal subscriptions at an increasing rate. This is primarily due to budgetary challenges, the unsustainable hyperinflationary pricing of these packages, and a need to move toward new open access models. It is a complex situation with many vested interests and stakeholders. Some libraries have been the target of angry backlash from faculty after such cancellations. The purpose of this qualitative study is to discover strategies for communicating to the campus community about collections cancellations so that they will better understand and support the library in making these difficult decisions.
Jeffrey Delgado
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.1.130

Abstract:
Xan Arch and Isaac Gilman create a necessary, at times difficult to discuss, piece of writing that should be used by academic libraries across the nation. Academic Library Services for First Generation Students brings forth the question of how to address best librarian practices for first-generation students. They argue that current practices cater to middle-class white students. The academic setting is shaped in such a way that first-generation students are viewed as needing “assistance” when the actual problem lies within the institution and its support systems. This book’s structure facilitates a rich understanding of the problems within these institutions while also offering concrete examples for academic libraries that want to do better. The book begins by describing the social context of first-generation students in higher education generally and then addresses academic libraries in particular. It finishes with examples of how to adapt institutions to better support these students.
Robin E. Brown
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.1.129

Abstract:
Jessica Schomberg and Wendy Highby begin with a very broad and thought-provoking discussion of the demographics of disability. Diagnosed “behavioral disorders and mental illness are on the rise while diagnosed physical impairments are decreasing” (15). Disablement is defined very broadly, as occurring where there is a mismatch between the environment and ability. Their review of the evolution of disability theory is effective.
Ginger H. Williams
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.1.135

Abstract:
This collection brings together research from the library and student affairs fields to present a thorough look at methods for increasing student success among populations with distinct needs and characteristics: international, transfer, first-generation, and re-entry students, with international and first-generation populations receiving the most attention. It is a welcome addition to the academic library literature. The theories of well-established student affairs scholars, such as George Kuh and Vincent Tinto, are highlighted in many chapters’ literature reviews and appear in the bibliographies of nearly all chapters. Familiarity with this literature is key in engaging outside units within the academy and building the kinds of partnerships suggested by many authors in this work. Common themes include robust partnerships with academic writing centers, collaborating with graduate programs to increase ESL students’ research and writing skills, and deliberately structuring assignments to aid student comprehension and skill development.
Richelle L. Witherspoon,
College & Research Libraries, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.82.1.113

Abstract:
With attendance rates at library workshops and events in decline, the authors looked to data from practice to help the field move forward. Using survey responses from providers of 161 library workshops across Canada and the United States, the authors examined 10 key variables that are widely believed to impact attendance rates (topic, month, time, duration, advertising, location, target audience, series status, buy-in, and incentives). Analysis of the responses highlights several trends in attendance and offers a better understanding of what students are looking for from extracurricular educational opportunities like those provided by libraries.
Back to Top Top