Innovations in Education and Teaching International

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ISSN / EISSN : 1470-3297 / 1470-3300
Published by: Informa UK Limited (10.1080)
Total articles ≅ 1,246
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Latest articles in this journal

Jamie L. Gunderson,
Innovations in Education and Teaching International pp 1-11; https://doi.org/10.1080/14703297.2022.2075430

Abstract:
More students with disabilities are attending university than ever before. Many universities are adopting Universal Design for Learning (UDL) as a framework for accessible course design and delivery. Audio podcasting is a strategy well-aligned with all three principles of UDL, providing students with options for engagement, representation, and expression. The current systematic review explored the use of audio podcasting in higher education and its impact on teaching and learning. A total of 17 studies were examined based on the three principles of UDL. Findings suggest that although there is limited evidence of its impact on learning, students and educators find podcasting to be a unique way to engage with content.
Innovations in Education and Teaching International pp 1-10; https://doi.org/10.1080/14703297.2022.2075431

Abstract:
PhD researchers are increasingly working in non-academic sectors, garnering interest in the extent to which doctoral education is relevant for careers beyond academia. Writing, arguably the most important and challenging activity PhDs must master, is a skill also coveted in the knowledge economy, required of employees across labour sectors. Using the concept of genre knowledge to frame how genres are performed in various situations, this exploratory qualitative study examines the perceptions of UK PhD holders in non-academic posts regarding the similarities and differences between academic and non-academic genres and the relevance of their PhD writing skills to their workplace writing. Findings suggest that PhD researchers’ time and investment in academic writing during the degree leads to an understanding of how genres work – knowledge that allows PhDs to adjust to writing in new situations.
Innovations in Education and Teaching International pp 1-14; https://doi.org/10.1080/14703297.2022.2064326

Abstract:
The aims explored associations between stress ratings and influences on coping and personality on student course satisfaction and anxiety. Most research construes stress as distress, with little attempt to consider positive ‘eustress’ experiences. Undergraduate students (N = 162) were surveyed on student and pandemic-related stressors, personality, support, control and on course satisfaction and anxiety. For course satisfaction, conscientiousness was the strongest predictor, followed by uplifting ratings of learning resources adapted during the pandemic. These uplifting ratings also support the efficacy of optimism. Support ratings were significant, but only as a hassle. This suggests work still needs to be done to maximise support opportunities on virtual learning platforms. Lack of motivation was strongly associated with anxiety. Context control and optimism had a buffering and mediating effect on levels of anxiety. Optimistic thinking strategies were effective in managing pandemic circumstances outside student control. Conscientiousness, control, support and optimism are integral in building student coping.
Innovations in Education and Teaching International pp 1-11; https://doi.org/10.1080/14703297.2022.2062031

Abstract:
Block mode delivery is widely practised in higher education institutions across the world. It is popular at postgraduate level, such as in business and management fields, but is less common at undergraduate level, especially for studio design teaching. There is a lack of literature on the block mode delivery for studio design teaching. The aim of this paper is to identify the favourable attributes and challenges of the block mode delivery for studio design teaching through the analysis of three undergraduate design studio units at an Australian university as case studies. Students’ written feedback of studying these three units were collected and reviewed to evaluate strategies for enhancing student engagement. Challenges of block teaching to students and staff are discussed. The findings suggest that there are various ways to engage with students for active learning in block teaching, which are valuable for curriculum design and continuous improvement.
Innovations in Education and Teaching International pp 1-10; https://doi.org/10.1080/14703297.2022.2062424

Abstract:
This paper reports on responses of 645 students (N = 6540) on 4 University of London (UoL) distance learning courses to a variety of course components. Published research on best practice in student learning stresses the value of active learning and of student collaboration. By contrast, our respondents report that they regard more active individual learning components such as reflection and self-assessment exercises as less helpful than course content such as readings, and they rate peer engagement much less highly than individual learning. We discuss why these learning behaviours and preferences seem to be at odds with accepted best practice, and explore possible implications for design and operation of online learning.
Innovations in Education and Teaching International pp 1-11; https://doi.org/10.1080/14703297.2022.2065329

Abstract:
Although doctoral supervision involves guiding the writing process, limited research exists regarding how faculty practice writing supervision. This case study investigates how faculty in one U.S. educational leadership department supervise doctoral writing. While the department incorporates best practices for student writing support and preparation, findings demonstrate continued challenges with student writing that result in trade-off decisions for supervisors’ investment of time and emotional labour. The results, analysed through a doctoral writing supervision framework, suggest that student commitment to writing development may need more emphasis in order to increase completion rates and reduce faculty labour.
, Yifat Ben David
Innovations in Education and Teaching International pp 1-10; https://doi.org/10.1080/14703297.2022.2052931

Abstract:
This study is an exploratory study aiming to add to the scarce research exploring the enhancement of 21st century skills across the undergraduate years of Education student. Data were collected from 329 undergraduates (96% females), who learned at Ashkelon Academic College, Israel. 103 students (31%) were at the beginning of the freshman year, 102 students (31%) were at the end of the second school year, and 123 students (38%) were at the end of the graduation and final school year. The 21st century skills were assessed using a 32 Likert-type item questionnaire about 21st century skills. Results indicated of positive relations between all 21st century skills, and between undergraduates` matriculation examination grades and all these skills, except for ICT. Significant differences in 21st century skills were found between freshman year and advanced years. 21st century skills mastery was higher in advanced years compared to freshman year. Educational implications are discussed.
, Mihai Boicu
Innovations in Education and Teaching International pp 1-11; https://doi.org/10.1080/14703297.2022.2063924

Abstract:
The cyber security environment, its threats, and its defence strategies are constantly changing. Educational programmes and their curriculum are known to be slow changing and at times out-of-date, resulting in content that may not be as relevant to their students and the industry. This research paper will 1 – present an overview of the curriculum development (CDev) process when using committees and their hindrance, 2 – describe the concept of crowdsourcing and its benefits when using domain experts, 3 – propose a Curriculum Development using Crowdsourcing Framework (CDC-F) to integrate expert crowdsourcing into parts of the CDev process (specifically the identification of industry-relevant topics and sub-topics for further curriculum content development), and 4 – present the process and results of ang experiment utilising the CDC-F.
Innovations in Education and Teaching International pp 1-12; https://doi.org/10.1080/14703297.2022.2060850

Abstract:
Although increasing numbers of studies have examined online teaching in the last decade, examination during a crisis context is rare. This study fills this critical gap and is a rapid response research to suggest insights on how to manage the transformation to online teaching as the COVID-19 pandemic unfolds. Based on 16 interviews with educators from a university located in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) region, namely, Qatar, we present measures of support that contribute towards charting the path to the next normal. Our recommendations are segregated along three categories of educator-focused support, student-focused support, and institution-focused support.
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