Egyptian Poultry Science Journal

Journal Information
EISSN : 2090-0570
Current Publisher: Zagazig University Medical Journal (10.21608)
Total articles ≅ 275
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Abeer Rabie Khosht, Ahmed Abd El Khalek, Mohamed Abdel Magid
Egyptian Poultry Science Journal, Volume 40, pp 631-645; doi:10.21608/epsj.2020.114320

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Mohamed M AboelFadl, Farid Nassif, Osama Elghalid, Ahmed Mohamed Abd El-Hady
Egyptian Poultry Science Journal, Volume 40, pp 613-629; doi:10.21608/epsj.2020.114318

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Mahmoud Mostafa El-Attrouny, Walid Shabaan Habashy
Egyptian Poultry Science Journal, Volume 40, pp 599-612; doi:10.21608/epsj.2020.114314

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Mohamed Moustafa El-Kashef
Egyptian Poultry Science Journal, Volume 40, pp 729-741; doi:10.21608/epsj.2020.115583

Abstract:
This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of different levels of Nigella sativa meal (NSM) on performance, immunity and some blood biochemical and hematological parameters of broiler chicks. A total of 120, one day-old broiler chicks (Hubbard) were divided into four treatment groups, with three replicates per treatment and 10 chicks per replicate. Chicks in control group were fed basal diet. Birds in treatment groups were fed on diets supplemented with 3, 6 and 9% NSM. Body weights of broilers were measured at one, 21 and 42 days, feed intake was measured at the same periods and feed conversion was calculated, accordingly. Blood samples of three birds per replicate were collected at 30 and 42 days of age from wing vein were taken for biochemical and hematological analysis. At ages 30 and 42 days, two chicks (one male and one female) were taken randomly from each replicate and slaughtered and the spleen, thymus and bursa were separated and weighted. Results of this experiment showed that, supplementing 3 and 6% of NSM improved body weight gain (BWG) and feed conversion ratio (FCR) of broilers at starter and grower periods (P
Taha Mohamed Sharaqa
Egyptian Poultry Science Journal, Volume 40, pp 673-683; doi:10.21608/epsj.2020.114326

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Sayed Ahmed Abdel-Fattah, Ahmed Ahmed Khattab, Mrwan Abdelaziz Mahmoud Abdelaziz
Egyptian Poultry Science Journal, Volume 40, pp 685-699; doi:10.21608/epsj.2020.114312

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Asmaa Shawkey Elnaggar, Abdallah Ghazalah, Abdel Hamid Elsayed, Asmaa Abdelalem
Egyptian Poultry Science Journal, Volume 40, pp 577-597; doi:10.21608/epsj.2020.112468

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Sabbah Farouk Farouk Youssef, Hoda El-Said El-Gabrey, Hesham Ahmed Abdel Latif, Mohamed Nabil Ali
Egyptian Poultry Science Journal, Volume 40, pp 647-662; doi:10.21608/epsj.2020.114324

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Uduak Okon Olayemi, Adebisi Favour Agboola, Eustace Ayemere Iyayi
Egyptian Poultry Science Journal, Volume 40, pp 743-751; doi:10.21608/epsj.2020.115972

Abstract:
Standardised Ileal Amino Acid Digestibility (SIAAD) of maize, wheat, soybean meal (SM), groundnut cake (GC) and rice bran (RB) in broiler finisher diets was investigated. Three hundred and sixty 35-day old Arbor Acre broiler chicks were randomly allotted to a Nitrogen-Free Diet (NFD) and five semi-purified diets containing each of the test feedstuffs (maize, wheat, SM, GC and RB) as the sole source of protein. Diets were fed to ten birds of six replicates up to day-42 in a randomised complete block design. Chromic oxide (5 g/kg) was added to the feed as an indigestible dietary marker. Six birds per replicate were asphyxiated with CO2 and digesta samples were collected from terminal ileum on day 42. The endogenous amino acid losses (EAAL), apparent ileal amino acid digestibility (AIAAD) and SIAAD were estimated. Highest EAAL concentration was found in threonine (0.29g/kg), while glutamic acid and alanine (0.03g/kg) had the least. Total AIAAD were 69.47, 59.49, 70.48, 73.04 and 62.21%, in maize, wheat, SM, GC and RB, respectively. Correspondingly, total SIAAD were 70.86, 61.30, 71.76, 75.13 and 64.05%. Least SIAAD values of amino acids were recorded in wheat compared to the other feedstuffs. Isoleucine had the highest increase in wheat and GC with 3.1 and 3.73%, respectively. In SM and maize, threonine had the lowest increase with 8.0 and 0.94%, respectively. Average increase of SIAAD over AIAAD for indispensable amino acid was 1.58, 1.95, 1.37, 2.24 and 2.10% for maize, wheat, SM, GC and RB respectively. Results from the present study showed that correcting AIAAD for endogenous losses using nitrogen-free method resulted in increased digestibility values for all the feedstuffs.
Eden Olusegun Okanlawon, Kazeem Olajide Bello, Olufemi Sunday Akinola, Oluseyi Olutosin Oluwatosin, Oluwakemi Titilayo Irekhore, Racheal Oluwatoyin Ademolue
Egyptian Poultry Science Journal, Volume 40, pp 701-714; doi:10.21608/epsj.2020.115968

Abstract:
Sixty four (7-8 weeks old) crossbred male and female rabbits weighing between 700 and 800g were used to determine the effect of inclusion of Turmeric (Curcuma longa) powder on growth, economic benefits and reproductive performance of rabbits. The rabbits on sex basis were randomly allotted to diets containing four levels (0%, 0.5%, 1.0% and 1.5%) of turmeric powder as a supplement in a 2x4 factorial arrangement. Data were collected on growth performance and economic benefits. Reproductive, At 20 weeks old, 24 rabbits comprising of 8 bucks and 16 does along dietary treatment were used for reproductive performance evaluation in mating ratio of 1:2 per treatment. Data were collected on gestation length, litter size, birth weight and weaning weight. Data collected were analyzed using ANOVA. Highest (p < 0.05) weight gain (700.71g) was obtained with rabbits fed diet containing 1.0% turmeric supplement. Daily feed intake was (p < 0.05) highest (113.76g) within rabbits on 1.5% turmeric supplement while the least (99.48g) was recorded with rabbits fed diets containing 0.5% inclusion. There was no significant difference (P>0.05) on feed conversion ratio of the rabbits.. Litter size was (p < 0.05) highest (5.25) with rabbit fed 1.0% turmeric inclusion while least (3.00) was recorded with 1.5% turmeric inclusion. Litter weight at kindling was also significantly (p < 0.05) highest (147.25g) with rabbits fed 1.0% turmeric inclusion. No significant (p>0.05) difference was recorded on gestation length, litter size at weaning and weaning weight. The study concluded that turmeric inclusion had no detrimental effect of growth performance of rabbits. However, 1.0% supplement appeared as economic inclusion level for weight gain, efficient feed utilization, optimum profit, economic benefit, litter size and litter weight at kindling in rabbit production enterprise.
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