Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society

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ISSN / EISSN : 0003-021X / 1558-9331
Published by: Wiley-Blackwell (10.1002)
Total articles ≅ 23,183
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Shuo Yang, Ian Hallett, Hyunah Eustina Oh, Allan B. Woolf,
Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society; https://doi.org/10.1002/aocs.12549

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, Amanda de Sena Gusmão, Suzana Pedroza da Silva, , Alírio E. Rodrigues, Alexandre Ricardo P. Schuler, Cesar A. Moraes de Abreu
Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society; https://doi.org/10.1002/aocs.12548

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society, Volume 98, pp 955-955; https://doi.org/10.1002/aocs.12388

Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society; https://doi.org/10.1002/aocs.12542

Abstract:
For measuring trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA), there are two major official methods: American Oil Chemists Society (AOCS) method Ba 12a-2020 and International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14902:2001. The former was recently approved. The two methods differ in sample preparation, extraction, colorimetric assay systems and TIA calculations. In this study, the two methods were symmetrically compared using three unique sets of samples: assorted protein products of soybeans, pulses, and grains; soybeans boiled for varied durations; and soy white flakes toasted for varied durations. For given samples, significant differences existed in TIA measured by the two methods, resulting from effects related to the assay systems and TIA calculations, not from the difference in sample preparation and extraction. When the same trypsin was used, TIA (in mg trypsin inhibited/g sample) measured by the two methods were highly correlated (r = 0.9973, n = 27), giving an equation of y = 0.5464x − 0.4887, where y represents ISO values and x for AOCS values. The line connecting ratios of ISO/AOCS in TIA and AOCS values remained relatively flat around 0.53 but started to curve down when TIA approached the lowest. Furthermore, for the same samples, TIA values measured by the ISO method decreased with increasing specific activity of trypsin used, while AOCS values remained consistent, leading to decreasing ratios of ISO/AOCS. Therefore, accurate and direct comparison of the two methods was impossible. It could not be resolved by simply changing ISO method's calculations as hypothesized earlier. Regardless, for most samples, ISO values were roughly about 55% of AOCS values.
Snehal Ashokrao Holey, Kanaparedu P. C. Sekhar, Shalini Sanjay Mishra, Sanjit Kanjilal,
Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society; https://doi.org/10.1002/aocs.12536

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Dongzhe Sun, Shilei Li, Jiayi Shang, Linna You, Manyi Wang, Chengguo Sun,
Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society; https://doi.org/10.1002/aocs.12544

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Ana Carolina Rodríguez‐Negrette, María José Rodríguez‐Batiller, Victor Alonso García‐Londoño, Virginia Borroni, ,
Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society; https://doi.org/10.1002/aocs.12541

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Eduard Colomer‐Llombart, Mercedes Aguilar‐Jiménez, Teresa Calvet
Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society; https://doi.org/10.1002/aocs.12543

Abstract:
High-commercial-value products are often susceptible to food fraud. Among them, Iberian dry-cured ham is highly appreciated due to its particular and sensory, but also nutritional, properties. There are four different Iberian ham categories (namely bellota, recebo, cebo de campo and cebo), which directly depend on the rearing system of the pig during the last stage of the fattening phase. However, there is still a lack of a normalized and robust method capable of authenticating the different product categories and, therefore, preventing mislabeling. In the present work, we characterized the polymorphic behavior of raw (before curing) lipid extracts belonging to the four categories of Iberian pig. A total of 80 different samples were analyzed by DSC, and synchrotron radiation XRD experiments were carried out for selected ones. The results obtained showed that bellota and recebo categories exhibited essentially the same crystallization and polymorphic behavior and this was significantly different (p < 0.05) from that of cebo de campo and cebo. The latter exhibited higher crystallization and melting temperatures than bellota and recebo samples, due to the occurrence of an additional β′-2L polymorphic form. By considering the differences in rearing systems of pigs belonging to the different categories, we concluded that the key factor which determined the polymorphism of Iberian pig lipid extracts was not the physical exercise practiced by the pig, but the inclusion of acorns in the feeding system. This work demonstrated that thermal and crystallographic techniques, like DSC and XRD, may be promoted to be used as fingerprinting tools for the authentication of high-value food products.
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