Journal of Intelligence and Terrorism Studies

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 2398-6131 / 2398-6131
Current Publisher: Veruscript (10.22261)
Total articles ≅ 17
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Latest articles in this journal

Guy Y. Dampier, Christopher Catherwood, Renad Mansour
Journal of Intelligence and Terrorism Studies, Volume 2, pp 1-9; doi:10.22261/ejtev5

Abstract:
The Islamic State has proven extremely successful over the last two years. Various explanations have been offered for this, including the role of former Ba’athists and experienced Chechen soldiers in assisting the organisation. This article argues that one aspect which has hitherto been overlooked is the influence of theghaziwarriors of early Islam on the Islamic State’s culture, tactics, and self-conception.
Diva Patang Wardak, Emin Daskin, David Gosling
Journal of Intelligence and Terrorism Studies, Volume 2, pp 1-11; doi:10.22261/lds6aj

Abstract:
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Diva Patang Wardak
Journal of Intelligence and Terrorism Studies, Volume 2; doi:10.22261/10.22261/lds6aj

Abstract:
Governments in Afghanistan paid little attention to the basic function and importance of intelligence during the last four decades. Immediately after the United States drawdown at the end of 2014, the National Directorate of Security (NDS) faced numerous challenges in tackling certain issues, which will be outlined in detail throughout this article, since the Pakistan Inter-Services Intelligence trained and funded the Taliban on its soil and continues to provide military and financial support to the Taliban and other terrorist groups carrying out attacks against the Afghan Security Forces across the country. The NDS continues to suffer from key intelligence capabilities, especially in gathering intelligence information from remote areas in order to prevent Pakistan’s interference in Afghanistan affairs. The failure of major powers to come to the aid of Afghanistan and strengthen its intelligence agency not only created more extremism, radicalisation, and terrorism but also created insecurity and instability. Consequently, to thoroughly analyse the intelligence operations of the NDS, detailed interviews were conducted with senior political figures. This article argues that the reform of the intelligence agencies is imperative, and the depoliticisation of the intelligence process is as much an element of national reconciliation as consolidation of power. Reforming the intelligence agencies therefore requires not only a change in the state, but also a change in the state of mind of the players involved.
Matthew J. Cadbury, Peter Mattis, Glenn C. Sluijter, Marcus M. Curran
Journal of Intelligence and Terrorism Studies, Volume 2; doi:10.22261/23s441

Abstract:
This article reconsiders the causes of the failure to defend Pearl Harbor from carrier-borne air attack in 1941. Existing literature is consulted on command failures, intelligence failures and conspiracy theories. An additional psychological explanatory factor of denial is proposed and compared to the other possible causes. Failure to activate air defence systems is found to be the direct cause of the defence failure. This article concludes that Admiral Kimmel and General Short were in a state of denial of the possibility of an attack and this was likely to have been a contributory factor in their failure to activate air defence systems. By comparison, military intelligence — which is the focus of much of the Pearl Harbor literature — is not found to have played a major role. This finding suggests that too much emphasis is placed on intelligence in the analysis of the attack on Pearl Harbor.
Philip C. Bobbitt
Journal of Intelligence and Terrorism Studies, Volume 1, pp 1-3; doi:10.22261/rwddvw

Abstract:
We commonly think about the relationship between the wars on terror and the values of a democratic republic in erroneous ways.
Philip C. Bobbitt
Journal of Intelligence and Terrorism Studies, Volume 1; doi:10.22261/10.22261/rwddvw

Abstract:
We commonly think about the relationship between the wars on terror and the values of a democratic republic in erroneous ways.
Jason Heeg, Danielle Deboutte, William Styles
Journal of Intelligence and Terrorism Studies, Volume 1, pp 1-17; doi:10.22261/72os9t

Bodo Hechelhammer
Journal of Intelligence and Terrorism Studies, Volume 1, pp 1-13; doi:10.22261/w69sea

Emin Daskin
Journal of Intelligence and Terrorism Studies, Volume 1, pp 1-14; doi:10.22261/plv6pe

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