Journal of Career Development

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 0894-8453 / 1556-0856
Published by: SAGE Publications (10.1177)
Total articles ≅ 2,071
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Journal of Career Development; https://doi.org/10.1177/08948453221100744

Abstract:
Occupational gender segregation is still a persistent problem in the labor market. This study investigates gender differences in gender typicality and prestige of occupational aspirations in early adolescence, as well as the role of agency and communion in these differences. In total, 2779 adolescents (age 11–15) reported their occupational aspirations, later coded for gender typicality and prestige. Participants also described themselves spontaneously with three attributes, then coded in terms of agency and communion. The results showed significant gender differences in a stereotypical direction for 40% of the occupations named, with boys expressing a clear preference for male-dominated and girls for female-dominated occupations. Conversely, the results revealed higher aspirations among girls regarding occupational prestige. Communion was found to be a significant mediator between gender and aspirations to typically feminine occupations, while agency mediated the relationship between gender and the prestige of aspirations. The findings’ implications for theory and practice are discussed.
Qianyu Zhu, Jing Ni, , Yin Jia
Journal of Career Development; https://doi.org/10.1177/08948453221087975

Abstract:
An exploration study was conducted to explore what Chinese undergraduates considered to be a “good job.” A total of 143 ( M = 21.45, SD = 1.53, 51.04% male) undergraduates from 10 cities participated in this study. The prototype research methodology was applied to explore the underlying complex structure of the “good job.” The results revealed 157 items associated with the “good job” that were merged into two categories “high-quality work” and “high-quality life.” Furthermore, each category included basic- and superordinate-levels prototypes. The structure depicted Chinese undergraduates’ expectations of a “good job” and emphasized the importance of work-life balance among young people. Additionally, traditional Chinese culture was consistently found to have a significant impact on young people’s expectations of a “good job.” These findings have implications for career development research and career counseling practices about Chinese young people.
, Yoshitaka Mitate,
Journal of Career Development; https://doi.org/10.1177/08948453221094311

Abstract:
Although job seekers often rely on indirect or inaccurate information to assess the attractiveness of potential employers, internship experience provides more realistic and accurate information, which may influence organizational attractiveness. Through the ex-ante and ex-post (i.e., pre-internship and post-internship) research design with a sample of Japanese undergraduate students in a university-sponsored internship program, we found that, although organizational attractiveness on average declined after the internship, skill variety and feedback from employees in the internship job were positively related to perceived needs-supplies (NS) fit beyond the effect of its pre-internship level. The NS fit, in turn, was related to organizational attractiveness beyond the effect of its pre-internship level. Moreover, some of the above mediating effects were stronger for interns with high social skill and/or high self-esteem. Our findings highlight the importance of the effect of internships on college students’ school-to-work transition.
, Virginia Snodgrass Rangel
Journal of Career Development; https://doi.org/10.1177/08948453221086979

Abstract:
Existing inequalities in STEM-related vocational-technical education (VTE) programs are more prevalent than within 4-year programs. Situated in Chile, this study tests whether Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT) adequately explains career development among students enrolled in STEM-VTE programs. In doing so, it also examines how external factors such as supports, barriers, and secondary track differentially affect career development by gender. Using a sample of 698 students in their second year of STEM-VTE studies, we confirmed that the SCCT model produced a good fit for the data in this alternative institutional setting. The findings also showed few gender differences in the effects of external factors on self-efficacy and career expectations, except for teaching support that substantially alters these cognitive factors to more extent among males than females. Moreover, although self-efficacy beliefs were similar between gender, gains in career expectations due to these beliefs are lower for female students. We conclude by discussing implications for future research and practice.
Xinyi Bian
Journal of Career Development; https://doi.org/10.1177/08948453221095864

Abstract:
This paper is a first attempt to draw attention to the misconception and stigma of career interruptions and provide a new conceptualization of this widely existing career phenomenon. The unique contribution of introducing Taoism into conceptualizing career interruptions is to help bring the ontological aspects of career interruptions into a sharper focus. The present study borrows the conceptions such as Wu, Wu-Wei, and the cyclic motion of time from Chinese Taoism to reveal the attributes of career interruptions and introduce the appreciator stance into the career interruption literature. The article is structured as follows. First, an overview of the literature is provided. Second, the present study argues that a reconceptualization is needed to deal with the misconception and stigma associated with career interruptions. Third, borrowing from the wisdom of traditional Chinese Taoism, four propositions are developed to help reconceptualize career interruptions. Implications for research and practice are discussed.
, Danni Lei, Jon Woodend
Journal of Career Development; https://doi.org/10.1177/08948453221094309

Abstract:
During the previous decade, growth in the numbers of internationally mobile students included international high school students. Prior research on international students’ career development in higher education may not account for the unique context of younger international students in secondary schools. The current study investigated career influences for international secondary students, using the Systems Theory Framework ( Patton & McMahon, 2021 ). International students in senior years completed written, open-ended surveys and in-person interviews regarding their career aspirations, plans and key influences on their decision-making. International student coordinators and school staff also offered their perspectives about these influences. Results indicate the inter-related systemic influences of individuals, significant relationships, location and country contexts, the secondary school environment, and perceived characteristics of occupations and future career pathways. Implications for supporting international high school students in the school setting and future research directions are discussed.
Ziyi Li, Hao-Yun Zou, , Lixin Jiang, Yan Tu, Yi Zhao
Journal of Career Development; https://doi.org/10.1177/08948453221090610

Abstract:
Job insecurity has become one of the most prominent job stressors for employees. This study focuses on qualitative job insecurity (QJI) and its spillover effects to the family domain. Despite a positive association between QJI and work-to-family conflict revealed in the literature, research on why and when QJI is related to work-to-family conflict is limited. Drawing from Conservation of Resources theory, this paper empirically examines the mediating role of negative affective process underlying the relationship between QJI and work-to-family conflict as well as the moderating role of core self-evaluations in this process. A four-wave survey study was conducted in a sample of 126 Chinese employees. The results showed that psychological contract violation and job dissatisfaction mediated the relationship between QJI and work-to-family conflict. Unexpectedly, core self-evaluations were found to strengthen (not attenuate) the positive relationships of QJI with employee psychological contract violation and job dissatisfaction.
Stephanie Masters, Joan M. Barth
Journal of Career Development; https://doi.org/10.1177/08948453221089364

Abstract:
There is a workforce shortage in middle-skill occupations requiring some educational training but not a 4-year college degree, such as skilled trades (e.g., construction), transportation (e.g., drivers), and manufacturing. Identifying factors that promote adolescent interest in middle-skill occupations is crucial in combating this shortage. This study examined whether variables contributing to adolescent interest in STEM occupations, such as gender, occupation goal affordances, and occupational knowledge, extend to middle-skill occupations. Results from hierarchical linear models revealed that adolescents ( N = 502) were interested in middle-skill occupations for which they felt knowledgeable and perceived to afford agentic and communal goals. The effect of perceived knowledge on interest in construction and manufacturing occupations was stronger for boys than girls. Efforts to increase interest in middle-skill occupations should address the gender gap in perceived knowledge and highlight how these occupations fulfill agentic and communal goals.
Esli Kekana, , Sumari O’Neil
Journal of Career Development; https://doi.org/10.1177/08948453221086980

Abstract:
Our research aimed to expand the understanding of decent work at a micro level by exploring the concept among the intended target group for which the Psychology of Work Theory (PWT) was developed for (unskilled and semi-skilled workers). By using an interpretive phenomenological approach and drawing on 13 focus group discussions (with 71 South African blue-collar workers), our findings revealed both objective (e.g. job characteristics and resources, working conditions and skills reproduction) and subjective dimensions (e.g. challenge and mastery and fairness) of decent work. We expand existing knowledge about the work experiences of blue-collar workers as an underrepresented research sample, specifically within a non-western context (i.e. South Africa). Furthermore, we provide some in-depth nuances when considering the PWT for blue-collar workers. Based on our empirical findings and extant literature, our study shows ways in which the existing conceptualizations of decent work can be expanded in order to reflect the perceptions of blue-collar workers in South Africa.
Arnold R. Spokane
Journal of Career Development; https://doi.org/10.1177/08948453221090486

Abstract:
Rayman & Gottfredson’s (2020) My Life with a theory is reviewed with comments on the insights provided by the volume.
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