International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 0340-0131 / 1432-1246
Published by: Springer Nature (10.1007)
Total articles ≅ 5,729
Current Coverage
SCOPUS
LOCKSS
MEDICUS
MEDLINE
PUBMED
SCIE
Archived in
EBSCO
SHERPA/ROMEO
Filter:

Latest articles in this journal

Chih-Wei Wu, Hung-Yi Chuang, Kazuhiro Watanabe, Pei-Shan Wu, Hui-Chen Pan, Chao-Ling Wang, , Chih-Hsing Hung, Chia-Yen Dai, Chi-Kung Ho, et al.
International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health pp 1-11; https://doi.org/10.1007/s00420-022-01837-9

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Håkan Tinnerberg, Jakob Löndahl, Therese Klang, Emilia Viklund, Jeong-Lim Kim, Linus Schiöler, Niklas Forsgard, Anna-Carin Olin
International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health pp 1-11; https://doi.org/10.1007/s00420-022-01833-z

Abstract:
Purpose: Air monitoring has been the accepted exposure assessment of toxic metals from, e.g., welding, but a method characterizing the actual dose delivered to the lungs would be preferable. Sampling of particles in exhaled breath can be used for the biomonitoring of both endogenous biomarkers and markers of exposure. We have explored a new method for the sampling of metals in exhaled breath from the small airways in a study on welders. Methods: Our method for particle sampling, Particles in Exhaled Air (PExA®), is based on particle counting and inertial impaction. We applied it on 19 stainless steel welders before and after a workday. In parallel, air monitoring of chromium, manganese and nickel was performed as well as blood sampling after work. Results: Despite substantial exposure to welding fumes, we were unable to show any significant change in the metal content of exhaled particles after, compared with before, exposure. However, the significance might be obscured by a substantial analytical background noise, due to metal background in the sampling media and possible contamination during sampling, as an increase in the median metal contents were indicated. Conclusions: If efforts to reduce background and contamination are successful, the PExA® method could be an important tool in the investigations of metals in exhaled breath, as the method collects particles from the small airways in contrast to other methods. In this paper, we discuss the discrepancy between our findings and results from studies, using the exhaled breath condensate (EBC) methodology.
, Saeid Bashirian, Salman Khazaei, Mojtaba Khazaei, Abdollah Farhadinasab
International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health pp 1-15; https://doi.org/10.1007/s00420-022-01835-x

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Robert H. Pietrzak, Jordyn H. Feingold, Shumayl Syed, Chi C. Chan, James W. Murrough, Carly Kaplan, Jaclyn Verity, Adriana Feder, Dennis S. Charney, et al.
International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health pp 1-13; https://doi.org/10.1007/s00420-022-01832-0

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, , J. Wang, L. Tso, Y. Ashagre, C. Han
International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health pp 1-11; https://doi.org/10.1007/s00420-021-01820-w

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Ping Shih, Ching-Chun Huang, Tung-Liang Chiang, Pau-Chung Chen,
International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health pp 1-11; https://doi.org/10.1007/s00420-021-01821-9

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
S. Barker, , J. M. Spiegel, B. Kistnasamy, F. Riera, A. Fourie, N. Mtshali, M. Rabada, K. Lockhart, A. Yassi
International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health pp 1-9; https://doi.org/10.1007/s00420-021-01805-9

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Ove Björ, Helena Eriksson, Bengt Järvholm, Ralph Nilsson, Eva Andersson
International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health pp 1-9; https://doi.org/10.1007/s00420-021-01828-2

Abstract:
Purpose: Lung cancer, mesothelioma and several lifestyle-associated cancer forms have been reported more common in merchant seafarers. However, few studies reflect recent occupational settings and women seafarers are usually too scarce for meaningful analyses. We conducted a study on cancer incidence between 1985 and 2011 in a Swedish cohort consisting of male and female seafarers. Methods: All seafarers in the Swedish Seafarers’ Register with at least one sea service between 1985 and 2011 and a cumulated sea service time of ≥ 30 days (N = 75,745; 64% men, 36% women; 1,245,691 person-years) were linked to the Swedish Cancer Register and followed-up until 31 December 2011. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) were calculated with the general population as reference. Results: There were 4159 cancer cases in total, with 3221 among men and 938 among women. Male seafarers had an increased risk of total cancer (SIR 1.05; 95% CI 1.01–1.09), lung cancer (SIR 1.51; 95% CI 1.35–1.67) and urinary bladder cancer (SIR 1.17; 95% CI 1.02–1.33). Several lifestyle-associated cancer forms were more common in men. Previous work on tankers was associated with leukaemia (SIR 1.41; 95% CI 1.00–1.86). The risk of cancer decreased with a start as a male seafarer after 1985, with a significant trend for total cancer (P< 0.001), lung cancer (P = 0.001) and, for tanker seafarers, leukaemia (P = 0.045). Women seafarers had an increased risk of lung cancer (SIR 1.54; 95% CI 1.23–1.87) but the risk of total cancer was not increased (SIR 0.83; 95% CI 0.78–0.89). Conclusions: In this cohort of merchant Swedish seafarers 1985–2011, the risk of total cancer was increased in men but not in women compared to the general population. Lung cancer was increased in both genders. The risk of cancer seems to decrease over the last decades, but better exposure assessments to occupational carcinogens and longer observation times are needed.
, Michelle Van Laethem, Constanze Leineweber, Hugo Westerlund
International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health pp 1-14; https://doi.org/10.1007/s00420-021-01824-6

Abstract:
Purpose: Older workers are expected to suffer more from work changes than younger ones, but empirical evidence is lacking. Negative responses to work changes may result rather from maladaptive coping expectations. This study examined possible age differences in job and life satisfaction, and sleep disturbances, after work changes (voluntary and involuntary job changes, reorganizations) and the moderating role of maladaptive coping expectations. Methods: Four biennial waves from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) including respondents who participated in all four waves (n = 3084). We used multilevel path analyses to estimate direct and moderated relationships between work changes and outcomes. Results: Involuntary job changes were associated with lower job and life satisfaction and more sleep disturbances. Reorganizations were only associated with lower job satisfaction. Older employees were more satisfied with their jobs and lives than younger employees and experienced more sleep disturbances. After involuntary job changes, older employees had similar (lower) levels of well-being as younger ones, but they reported more sleep disturbances when having experienced reorganizations. Maladaptive coping expectations were related to lower job and life satisfaction and more sleep disturbances. Employees with maladaptive coping expectations reported more sleep disturbances after involuntary job changes and reorganizations. Conclusion: Our results suggest that there are few age differences in well-being after work changes. Employee well-being seems to mostly depend on maladaptive coping expectations. Organizations aiming to prepare employees for job changes and reorganizations could focus their efforts on employees with maladaptive expectations rather than on older ones.
Back to Top Top