Journal of Advanced Nursing

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 0309-2402 / 1365-2648
Current Publisher: Wiley (10.1111)
Former Publisher:
Total articles ≅ 15,248
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, , Lynda Hughes, Amy Johnston, Lynn Kilbride, Natasha Hubbard‐Murdoch,
Published: 9 June 2021
by Wiley
Journal of Advanced Nursing; doi:10.1111/jan.14892

Abstract:
Aims To explore the experiences of strategic leads for nurse education as they sought to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. Design We utilised a qualitative interpretative approach to explore education leaders’ experiences of leading during the early months of the pandemic. Methods Nineteen leaders with significant strategic responsibility for nurse education in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Singapore and the United Kingdom were identified via purposive sampling and agreed to participate. Interviews were held between May and July 2020. Results Four overarching themes arose from the analysis: (1) Crisis driven adaptability & flexibility; (2) Responsive, complex and changing communication; (3) Making decisions for student and staff safety; (4) Looking to the future; stronger partnerships. Conclusion Internationally, while nursing education leaders faced different problems, they shared a common goal amidst the crisis to remain student-centred. They demonstrated they were able to face major challenges, respond to large scale logistical problems and make decisions under significant and ongoing pressure. Impact In responding to the pandemic, nurse leaders shared knowledge and offered mutual support. This bodes well for future collaboration. The move to online learning accelerated an existing trend and it seems likely that this will continue. Given the pressures they experienced over an extended period, the sector may wish to consider how it prepares and supports existing and future leaders.
Erratum
Published: 7 June 2021
by Wiley
Journal of Advanced Nursing, Volume 77, pp 3254-3254; doi:10.1111/jan.14883

Published: 7 June 2021
by Wiley
Journal of Advanced Nursing, Volume 77; doi:10.1111/jan.14426

Chiu‐Shu Fang, Hsiu‐Hung Wang, , , Shih‐Lun Chang, Ching‐Ju Fang
Published: 7 June 2021
by Wiley
Journal of Advanced Nursing; doi:10.1111/jan.14914

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Phyllis Zhi En Wong
Published: 3 June 2021
by Wiley
Journal of Advanced Nursing; doi:10.1111/jan.14912

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, , , Sonia El‐Zaemey
Published: 3 June 2021
by Wiley
Journal of Advanced Nursing; doi:10.1111/jan.14909

Abstract:
Aim Aim of this study is to systematically review and synthesize available evidence to identify the association between nurse staffing methodologies and nurse and patient outcomes. Design Systematic review and narrative synthesis. Data sources A search of MEDLINE (EBSCO), CINAHL (EBSCO) and Web of Science was conducted for studies published in English between January 2000 and January 2020. Review methods The reporting of this review and narrative synthesis was guided by the preferred reporting items for systematic and meta-analysis guidelines (PRISMA) statement and data synthesis guided by the Synthesis Without Meta-analysis (SWiM) guideline. The quality of each article was assessed using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. Results Twenty-two studies met the inclusion criteria. Twenty-one used the mandated minimum nurse-to-patient ratio methodology and one study assessed the number of nurse hours per patient day staffing methodology. Both methodologies were mandated. All studies that reported on nurse outcomes demonstrated an improvement associated with the implementation of mandated minimum nurse-to-patient ratio, but findings related to patient outcomes were inconclusive. Conclusions Evidence on the impact of specific nurse staffing methodologies and patient and nurse outcomes remains highly limited. Future studies that examine the impact of specific staffing methodologies on outcomes are required to inform this fundamental area of management and practice.
, , , Matthew C. Carey, Rehena Sultana,
Published: 3 June 2021
by Wiley
Journal of Advanced Nursing; doi:10.1111/jan.14911

Abstract:
Aim To explore and understand the impact of paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admission on longitudinal health outcomes, experiences and support needs of children and their parents in the first 6 months after PICU discharge and to examine the role of ethnicity. Design This study uses a prospective, longitudinal design. Methods The sample will include children (N = 110) and at least one parent (N = 110) admitted to the PICU (KKH-AM start-up fund, October 2020). Quantitative study: Participants will be recruited at PICU admission. Data will be collected at five time points: during PICU admission (T0), at PICU discharge (T1), 1 month (T2), 3 months (T3) and 6 months (T4) after PICU discharge. Questionnaires will assess physical and cognitive outcomes of the child survivor. Emotional and social health outcomes will be assessed for both the child and the parents. Qualitative study: At least 12 parents will take part in a semi-structured interview conducted at both 1 and 6 months after PICU to explore their experiences and support needs after PICU discharge. All interviews will be audio-recorded with verbatim transcription. We will use framework analysis for qualitative data analysis. Discussion Understanding of Singapore health outcomes after critical illness in kids (SHACK) and their families is limited. There is an urgent need to comprehensively understand the health trajectory and consequences of the PICU child survivors and their families. This research will be the first to explore the health outcomes, needs and experiences after paediatric critical illness in Asia. Impact This study will provide an understanding of the health outcomes and trajectory of children and parents in the first 6 months after PICU discharge and examine the association between race and outcomes after PICU discharge. Identification of modifiable pre-disposing risk factors during the PICU admission will inform future interventions to improve long-term outcomes of children and parents following paediatric critical illness. Trial registration: Clinicaltrial.gov: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04637113.
Qinwen Shao, Yanjie Wang, Kunhua Hou, Haiping Zhao, Xianghong Sun
Published: 3 June 2021
by Wiley
Journal of Advanced Nursing; doi:10.1111/jan.14885

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Suet Mei Chew, Jia Hua Lee, Su Fee Lim, Min Jia Liew, Yi Xu,
Published: 1 June 2021
by Wiley
Journal of Advanced Nursing; doi:10.1111/jan.14913

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
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