Frontiers of Literary Studies in China

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 1673-7318 / 1673-7423
Published by: Springer Nature (10.1007)
Total articles ≅ 138
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Achilles Fang
Frontiers of Literary Studies in China, Volume 5, pp 457-476; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11702-011-0138-6

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Ellen Widmer
Frontiers of Literary Studies in China, Volume 5, pp 537-565; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11702-011-0141-y

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Yingjin Zhang
Frontiers of Literary Studies in China, Volume 5, pp 610-632; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11702-011-0144-8

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Ying Kong, Kong Ying
Frontiers of Literary Studies in China, Volume 5, pp 633-649; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11702-011-0145-7

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Michelle Yeh
Frontiers of Literary Studies in China, Volume 5, pp 600-609; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11702-011-0143-9

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Nanxiu Qian, Qian Nanxiu
Frontiers of Literary Studies in China, Volume 5, pp 511-536; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11702-011-0140-z

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Li Guo, Guo Li
Frontiers of Literary Studies in China, Volume 5, pp 566-599; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11702-011-0142-x

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Liyan Qin
Frontiers of Literary Studies in China, Volume 5, pp 303-320; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11702-011-0131-0

Abstract:
Xia Yan (1900–95), a very important leftist filmmaker in the 1930s, preferred film adaptation after 1949. This paper, by reading several of Xia Yan’s films written in the 1950s and 1960s against their literary sources, explores the changes he made to the sources and the strategies he used. It also outlines the different positions he took and the cultural history glimpsed through the films and Xia Yan’s role in them. This paper then analyzes how Xia Yan acted as a conformist vanguard repeating and re-enforcing the official ideology, as is shown in his adaptations of The New Year’s Sacrifice and Revolutionary Family. He was an ambivalent critic in the adaptation of The Lin Family Shop with its petite-bourgeois protagonist and its perhaps unintentional deconstruction of the official version of history. While, he reserved his humanistic concerns incognito for Hong Kong in the adaptation of Between Smiles and Tears. Xia Yan (1900–95), a very important leftist filmmaker in the 1930s, preferred film adaptation after 1949. This paper, by reading several of Xia Yan’s films written in the 1950s and 1960s against their literary sources, explores the changes he made to the sources and the strategies he used. It also outlines the different positions he took and the cultural history glimpsed through the films and Xia Yan’s role in them. This paper then analyzes how Xia Yan acted as a conformist vanguard repeating and re-enforcing the official ideology, as is shown in his adaptations of The New Year’s Sacrifice and Revolutionary Family. He was an ambivalent critic in the adaptation of The Lin Family Shop with its petite-bourgeois protagonist and its perhaps unintentional deconstruction of the official version of history. While, he reserved his humanistic concerns incognito for Hong Kong in the adaptation of Between Smiles and Tears.
Lanjun Xu
Frontiers of Literary Studies in China, Volume 5, pp 321-349; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11702-011-0132-z

Abstract:
This essay examines stories of girls coming of age as depicted by modern Chinese women writers—in particular to the pervasive ness of a certain melancholy in their treatment of the subject. This study offers a vantage point from which it will be possible to survey writers ranging from Ding Ling and Xiao Hong in the 1930s and 1940s to Wang Anyi and Tie Ning in the 1980s and 1990s. As a rule, these seemingly trivial coming-of-age stories are set in the whirlwind of historical change through deep sorrow and grief, not the transcendent aesthetics of the sublime as suggested by grand historical narratives. Mainly based on the close-reading of three literary texts including Xiao Hong’s novel Tales of Hulan River (1941), Tie Ning’s novel The Rose Door (1988), and Wang Anyi’s novel Reality and Fiction (1993), the author argues that the recurrent figure of the “melancholic girl” functions as an important trope in the writing of modern Chinese women writers and that it also serves to reveal various problematic aspects of women’s emancipation in modern China; at the same time, this essay also reveals how melancholy—in the psychological and clinical sense—serves to legitimize a certain degree of ego-formation in its female sufferers. This essay examines stories of girls coming of age as depicted by modern Chinese women writers—in particular to the pervasive ness of a certain melancholy in their treatment of the subject. This study offers a vantage point from which it will be possible to survey writers ranging from Ding Ling and Xiao Hong in the 1930s and 1940s to Wang Anyi and Tie Ning in the 1980s and 1990s. As a rule, these seemingly trivial coming-of-age stories are set in the whirlwind of historical change through deep sorrow and grief, not the transcendent aesthetics of the sublime as suggested by grand historical narratives. Mainly based on the close-reading of three literary texts including Xiao Hong’s novel Tales of Hulan River (1941), Tie Ning’s novel The Rose Door (1988), and Wang Anyi’s novel Reality and Fiction (1993), the author argues that the recurrent figure of the “melancholic girl” functions as an important trope in the writing of modern Chinese women writers and that it also serves to reveal various problematic aspects of women’s emancipation in modern China; at the same time, this essay also reveals how melancholy—in the psychological and clinical sense—serves to legitimize a certain degree of ego-formation in its female sufferers.
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