Education Sciences

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ISSN / EISSN : 2227-7102 / 2227-7102
Published by: MDPI AG (10.3390)
Total articles ≅ 1,520
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Published: 29 July 2021
by MDPI
Education Sciences, Volume 11; doi:10.3390/educsci11080390

Abstract:
The development of professional practices during the university stage is a fundamental factor for quality skills development. For many students, it is the first real experience in a professional context, so continuous monitoring by teachers is necessary. This article presents an innovative proposal to develop the follow-up of the professional practices of the degree in Primary Education, and two Masters’ in Psychopedagogy and Special Educational Needs using a learning management system (LMS) (Blackboard). The experience was developed by a team of teachers from the departments of Didactics and Educational Organization and Research Methods and Educational Diagnosis of the University of Seville (Spain). The aspects to be studied are the development of communication, reflection, and collaborative learning processes during the internship period. After an explicit agreement, 24 students (10 from the course “Professional Practices I” in undergraduate students; and the others from the Master’s) committed to periodically using the blog designed ad hoc for this experience. A content analysis of the speeches posted on the blog was carried out, examining the changes, the advantages, and the disadvantages that this model entailed. It allowed observing similarities and differences between both groups of students. As the main conclusion, there were some differences between the two groups of students, regarding the number, type, and contents of interventions; there were no differences in the assessment of the methodology, all the students thought that it was a very positive assessment of the experience for generating information exchange networks among colleagues and teachers. Finally, the relevance of constant monitoring of the academic tutor was highlighted.
Published: 29 July 2021
by MDPI
Education Sciences, Volume 11; doi:10.3390/educsci11080388

Abstract:
Academic identity is an important aspect of organizing an academic career. An academic identity is distinct and unique and can be defined as the core attitudes that determine how individuals approach the concept of work. In the current era of neoliberalism, changes to university governance in Taiwan have transformed working conditions and hiring practices in academia. Inevitably, role conflicts have emerged, and work stress within higher education institutions has increased. The current study summarizes the narratives of nine academics from the social sciences. The study is anchored in the concept that academic identity formation is rooted in the doctoral education stage. Using a qualitative narrative inquiry lens, interactions between different communities of practice during the doctoral education stage are analyzed, along with later career decisions and the role communities of practice play in those decisions. The findings show that doctoral mentors and fellows all contributed to the formation of a core academic identity, while later career decisions were equally affected by neoliberal policies. It is hoped that by recognizing the role of academic identity, administrators may be able to influence how academics adapt amidst the competing pressures within the academe.
Published: 29 July 2021
by MDPI
Education Sciences, Volume 11; doi:10.3390/educsci11080389

Abstract:
Quality is currently an often-used term in all areas of human activity. However, the measurement of quality is very problematic in the field of education, particularly if no specific, comprehensible criteria for its measurement, accepted by most subjects active in the specific sector, exist. Monitoring quality in the field of education is difficult because there is no long-term embedded quality standard and the established level can be affected not only by the selection of the chosen criteria for measurement, but also by determining specific weights when comparing the importance of the chosen criteria. The authors of this paper endeavour to point out one way of assessing the quality of publicly established universities in the Czech Republic during the academic years 2011/2012 and 2018/2019 on a basic sample of all 26 publicly established universities. The quality of the pedagogic apparatus and the converted number of students indicate that the classification of schools into categories according to the Ministry of Education, Youth, and Sports of the Czech Republic (MEYS) is possible, but the individual categories should be discussed and modified according to the assessment performed.
Published: 28 July 2021
by MDPI
Education Sciences, Volume 11; doi:10.3390/educsci11080387

Abstract:
There has been a marked increase in internship participation in recent decades. Many students who take cooperative programs consider internships to be the most appropriate entry point into their chosen careers. However, few studies have investigated factors related to internships from an engagement-value perspective that can influence the intention to continue doing internships with firms. This study concluded that academic self-efficacy was positively related to school and firm engagement; school engagement did not significantly relate to, but firm engagement did positively relate to the perceived usefulness of internships; and perceived usefulness of internships was positively related to intention to continue doing internships.
Published: 27 July 2021
by MDPI
Education Sciences, Volume 11; doi:10.3390/educsci11080383

Abstract:
Migration across the OECD this decade is reflected in increasingly diverse societies. Although migration into Ireland remains relatively low, increasing pupil diversity is evident in the physical, pedagogical, curricular, and socio-relational aspects of schooling. While the intensity of such changes are evident in teacher pedagogy, children’s social worlds, and classroom/school dynamics, most notable is the lack of policy development to support school practices. Drawing on two in-depth case studies, this paper aims to foreground minority ethnic children/young people’s voice(s) as they negotiate the complexity of identity (re)formation and belonging in school. It explores whether mis/recognition impacts teacher pedagogical practices through ability grouping, and minority ethnic children’s navigation of social spaces within/between the classroom. Using a children’s rights lens, this paper interrogates whether minority ethnic children’s right to education preparing them “for responsible life in a free society, in the spirit of understanding, peace (and) tolerance” (Article 29 (1), UNCRC, 1989) is being realised. Findings indicate the need to foreground minority ethnic children’s voices and rights to ensure how they “do”/”feel” learning is in their best interests and affords them equal opportunities in their school lives.
Published: 27 July 2021
by MDPI
Education Sciences, Volume 11; doi:10.3390/educsci11080384

Abstract:
This study explored the prioritization of English-medium instruction (EMI) teachers’ needs for faculty development and institutional support by applying a best–worst scaling approach to an EMI program in Japan. This prioritization is important as EMI programs need management under various constraints (e.g., time, budget, and teachers). This study also investigated how teachers’ needs for institutional support differ by English language competence and EMI teaching experience and their relationship with EMI programs (e.g., full-time or adjunct). Questionnaire surveys administered to 38 EMI teachers revealed that, overall, faculty development (FD) program menus training teaching styles, speaking skills, communication skills, and respecting the diversity of students should be prioritized such that it varies depending on the teachers’ English language competence levels but not their teaching experience. Irrespective of their relationship with EMI programs, the recognition and appreciation of their burdens, efforts, and contributions is most needed. There are noticeable differences based on their position over the necessity of pedagogical guidelines, teaching load, and economic incentive.
Published: 27 July 2021
by MDPI
Education Sciences, Volume 11; doi:10.3390/educsci11080385

Abstract:
The objective of this study is to characterize Latent Classes emerging from the analysis of the level of digital competences, use and consumption of applications and/or services through the Internet. For this purpose, the results of the survey Basic Digital Competences (Competencias Básicas Digitales-COBADI®) applied to university students, with more than 60 categorical variables, were considered. A total of 4762 undergraduate and graduate students from five Spanish universities participated in this survey: Complutense University of Madrid (UCM), Pablo de Olavide University (UPO), Almeria University (UAL), National University of Distance Education (UNED) and Rey Juan Carlos University (URJC). The application of the questionnaire was done through the Internet, from the Institute for Research in Social Sciences and Education of University of Atacama—Chile. The methodology used is mixed, because the questions of the questionnaire provide qualitative information that can be interpreted and elaborated from the results. It is also quantitative because basic statistical techniques are used for the exploratory analysis of the data, and later Latent Class Analysis (LCA), to complement the description of the data set and the variables considered in the study, thus allowing us to group the classes of variables that do not appear explicitly in the set of observed variables, but which nevertheless affect them. The results of the study show that regardless of the gender and age range of the participants, there are four clearly differentiated groups or classes in the use and consumption of ICTs in different ways for their activities, both personal and academic, which allows for identifying different developments of digital competences. This study allows establishing a baseline in order to be able to elaborate later, in the development of the digital competences currently needed, which should be developed by university students.
Published: 27 July 2021
by MDPI
Education Sciences, Volume 11; doi:10.3390/educsci11080386

Abstract:
The World Health Organization (WHO) officially declared the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) as a pandemic on 11 March 2020, and educational institutions have had to modify most of their activities (face-to-face activities were suspended). This situation forced academic institutions to modify the evaluation format of students. The use of proctoring systems quickly became widespread, although some controversies arose. The two main discussions regarding these systems are the integrity of the assessment and the capacity of the students to adapt to this new assessment method, without changes in theirs scores. To elucidate two controversies, we have analyzed the preferences and the scores obtained from a trial of 660 scores from 332 students of the third grade of Veterinary Medicine. The experiment involved three modalities of exam: an online format from home using the Respondus Lockdown Browser system (Modality 1), online in person using the Respondus Lockdown Browser system with the supervision of a teacher (Modality 2), or paper format in person with the supervision of a teacher (Modality 3). The results obtained showed that the students preferred Modality 1 (online at home with Respondus Lockdown Browser system). No statistical differences between the scores obtained by students were found between the three modalities analyzed. The proctoring system is a good method to adjudicate exams in higher education institutions, and the scores of students are similar to those obtained through traditional evaluation and control systems.
Published: 26 July 2021
by MDPI
Education Sciences, Volume 11; doi:10.3390/educsci11080382

Abstract:
Ecologists are increasingly using macrosystems approaches to understand population, community, and ecosystem dynamics across interconnected spatial and temporal scales. Consequently, integrating macrosystems skills, including simulation modeling and sensor data analysis, into undergraduate and graduate curricula is needed to train future environmental biologists. Through the Macrosystems EDDIE (Environmental Data-Driven Inquiry and Exploration) program, we developed four teaching modules to introduce macrosystems ecology to ecology and biology students. Modules combine high-frequency sensor data from GLEON (Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network) and NEON (National Ecological Observatory Network) sites with ecosystem simulation models. Pre- and post-module assessments of 319 students across 24 classrooms indicate that hands-on, inquiry-based modules increase students’ understanding of macrosystems ecology, including complex processes that occur across multiple spatial and temporal scales. Following module use, students were more likely to correctly define macrosystems concepts, interpret complex data visualizations and apply macrosystems approaches in new contexts. In addition, there was an increase in student’s self-perceived proficiency and confidence using both long-term and high-frequency data; key macrosystems ecology techniques. Our results suggest that integrating short (1–3 h) macrosystems activities into ecology courses can improve students’ ability to interpret complex and non-linear ecological processes. In addition, our study serves as one of the first documented instances for directly incorporating concepts in macrosystems ecology into undergraduate and graduate ecology and biology curricula.
Published: 26 July 2021
by MDPI
Education Sciences, Volume 11; doi:10.3390/educsci11080380

Abstract:
Combining classical educational methods with interactive three-dimensional (3D) visualization technology has great power to support and provide students with a unique opportunity to use them in the study process, training, and/or simulation of different medical procedures in terms of a Human Anatomy course. In 2016, Rīga Stradiņš University (RSU) offered students the 3D Virtual Dissection Table “Anatomage” with possibilities of virtual dissection and digital images at the Department of Morphology. The first 3D models were printed in 2018 and a new printing course was integrated into the Human Anatomy curriculum. This study was focused on the interaction of students with digital images, 3D models, and their combinations. The incorporation and use of digital technologies offered students great tools for their creativity, increased the level of knowledge and skills, and gave them a possibility to study human body structures and to develop relationships between basic and clinical studies.
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