Journal of Social Work in the Global Community

Journal Information
EISSN : 2642-1763
Current Publisher: Walden University (10.5590)
Total articles ≅ 3
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Articles in this journal

Alex D. Alex D. Colvin, Texas Woman's University, Denton, Texas, United States, Mahasin Mahasin Saleh, Doha Institute for Graduate Studies, Doha, Qatar, Nila Nila Ricks, et al.
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community, Volume 5; doi:10.5590/jswgc.2020.05.1.01

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Rebekah Rebekah Mohr, Stephen F. Austin State University, Jose Jose Carbajal, Stephen F. Austin State University, Bonita B. Bonita B. Sharma, The University of Texas at San Antonio
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community, Volume 4; doi:10.5590/jswgc.2019.04.1.02

Abstract:
The purpose of this study is to review the association between education and teenage pregnancy in low- and lower-middle-income countries. Teenage pregnancy deters women from achieving educational goals and from maximizing their human capital. This study was conducted using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. Nine out of 4,980 articles scanned met the inclusion criteria for analysis, from 2008 to 2018. The results show reaching higher levels of education deters from teenage pregnancy in low- and lower-middle-income countries. Therefore, social work policies and programs should target access to education and school retention as a deterrence to teenage pregnancy.
Bushra Bushra Sabri, Johns Hopkins University, Shreya Shreya Bhandari, Wright State University, Anuja Anuja Shah, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community, Volume 4; doi:10.5590/jswgc.2019.04.1.01

Abstract:
This study explored South Asian immigrant women survivors’ perspectives on intimate partner relationships that could lead to severe violence or a homicide and sources of resilience for South Asian immigrant survivors in the United States. The study recruited 16 South Asian immigrant survivors for in-depth interviews and focus groups. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Survivors shared some characteristics of dangerous partner such as controlling behavior, anger issues, infidelity, alcohol and drug problems, and history of childhood abuse. Incidents of severe physical abuse, threats to kill, possession of a weapon, and suspicious behavior led survivors to feel fearful for their lives. Sources of resilience in the community (e.g., support from formal sources of help) and at the individual level (e.g., education) were discussed. The needs for culturally informed services and to generate awareness of services among South Asian immigrants were highlighted.
Angela N. Angela N. Bullock, University of the District of Columbia, Alex D. Alex D. Colvin, Texas Woman's University
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community, Volume 3; doi:10.5590/jswgc.2018.03.1.02

Abstract:
What separates social work from other fields of human services is the underlying need to work toward equality and social justice for every population. This is often accomplished by working on behalf of those who are oppressed, marginalized, or disenfranchised. For that reason, it can be argued that advocacy is at the foundation of social work practice (Belluomini, 2014). The growth of social media and availability of low-cost and user-friendly innovations have changed the way people engage in advocacy. Social media has become an emerging tool for electronic advocacy. In the 21st century, social workers have engaged in electronic advocacy using new tools to address ongoing client issues and policy outcomes. There is a need for social work to heed the call to explore new forms of innovation to engage in advocacy. This article explores the practical usage of technological innovations as tools for engagement in electronic social work advocacy.
Marion M Marion M. Turner, Western Kentucky University, Simon P. Simon P. Funge, Western Kentucky University, Wesley J Wesley J. Gabbard, Western Kentucky University
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community, Volume 3; doi:10.5590/jswgc.2018.03.1.01

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Shreya Shreya Bhandari, Wright State University, Jennifer C Jennifer C. Hughes, Wright State University
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community, Volume 2; doi:10.5590/jswgc.2017.02.1.02

Abstract:
This article describes the lived experiences of domestic violence victims among a convenience sample of 21 low-income Indian women. The experiences of abuse are drawn from in-depth, face-to-face interviews conducted in Mumbai, India. The qualitative analysis describes four major categories of their lived experiences: (a) types of abuse, (b) family involvement in abuse, (c) treatment of children, and (d) abandonment. Domestic violence in Indian culture includes violence from the husband as well as the in-laws. Women are expected to endure violence for fear of bringing shame to their families. Social and financial support for abused woman is lacking.
Mitchell A. Mitchell A. Kaplan, Research Consultant, New York, NY, Licensed Social Worker Marian M. Inguanzo
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community, Volume 2; doi:10.5590/jswgc.2017.02.1.01

Abstract:
Human populations around the world are growing older at the most astounding rate in the history of humanity. Advances in technology are enabling health care providers to deliver the latest innovations in treatment and prevention services to a broader spectrum of adult populations across the lifespan making longevity increasingly more commonplace rather than the exception to the rule in most of the industrialized world. This article provides an overview of the key social, economic, and public health costs and consequences that aging populations will exact upon international communities in the years ahead. It also examines the most significant social challenges that global societies will face regarding their ability to develop and implement social policies and service programs that can effectively respond to the changing needs of their adult citizens who are growing older.
Hyun-A Hyun-a Song, University of Pittsburgh - Main Campus, Helen E Petracchi, Follow, Helen E. Petracchi, University of Pittsburgh
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community, Volume 1; doi:10.5590/jswgc.2015.01.1.01

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
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