DRC Sustainable Future: Journal of Environment, Agriculture, and Energy

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Current Publisher: Dama Research Center Limited (10.37281)
Total articles ≅ 10
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DRC Sustainable Future: Journal of Environment, Agriculture, and Energy; doi:10.37281/drcsf/1.1.editorial

Thapelo Shomana, Daniel Botha, Paul Şerban Agachi
DRC Sustainable Future: Journal of Environment, Agriculture, and Energy pp 66-72; doi:10.37281/drcsf/1.1.9

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Máté Szarka
DRC Sustainable Future: Journal of Environment, Agriculture, and Energy pp 60-65; doi:10.37281/drcsf/1.1.8

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DRC Sustainable Future: Journal of Environment, Agriculture, and Energy pp 54-59; doi:10.37281/drcsf/1.1.7

Abstract:
Although the current situation poses challenges to foretelling the future consequences of coronavirus spread, we consider that environmental load-related research has become more important than ever before. Many experts believe that in the framework of increasingly dire public health emergency, policy and decision makers should facilitate COVID-19 outbreak to transitioning to sustainable consumption and production. With the purpose of evaluating the importance of sustainability efforts, here we describe the total suspended particulates (TSP), originating from traffic emissions, caused by air pollution in the three most populous cities of Ecuador. Compared are measurements taken prior to, during, and after (i) traffic measures entered into force at national level; (ii) curfew entered into force at national level; and (iii) quarantine entered into force (in Guayaquil, and whole Guayas province). We documented significant decrease in TSP emissions (PM2.5 and PM10) as compared to normal traffic proceeding in four-lane roads, in the cities of Quito, Guayaquil, and Cuenca. The most substantial drop in suspended particulate values (96.47% decrease in PM2.5) relative to emissions observed prior to restricting traffic occurred in Cuenca.
Jesus R. Melendez, Alberto Peñalver, Paola Pincay Figueroa, Nelly L. Pulgar, Mayra Cayos
DRC Sustainable Future: Journal of Environment, Agriculture, and Energy pp 48-53; doi:10.37281/drcsf/1.1.6

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Adrian Patrut, Roxana T. Patrut, Laszlo Rakosy, Karl Von Reden
DRC Sustainable Future: Journal of Environment, Agriculture, and Energy pp 33-47; doi:10.37281/drcsf/1.1.5

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Sasmita Baral, Dhiraj Kumar Nanda
DRC Sustainable Future: Journal of Environment, Agriculture, and Energy pp 23-32; doi:10.37281/drcsf/1.1.4

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Zsolt Sándor
DRC Sustainable Future: Journal of Environment, Agriculture, and Energy pp 21-22; doi:10.37281/drcsf/1.1.31

Zsolt Sándor, Magdolna Tállai, Ida Kincses, Zoltán László, János Kátai, Imre Vágó
DRC Sustainable Future: Journal of Environment, Agriculture, and Energy pp 14-20; doi:10.37281/drcsf/1.1.3

Abstract:
Cultivating the top 0-25 cm soil layer by ploughing cultivating method requires considerable energy, labor, and additional costs. Also, the larger soil surface caused by cultivation, the moisture content of soil can be lost easier. Therefore, in recent years soil loosening cultivation has become gained popularity, particularly to protect the moisture content of soil and reduce the risk of desertification. At the Experimental Station of Debrecen University, known as Látókép (a name, which corresponds approximately to visual image), two cultivation methods have been applied for research: (i) conventional ploughing and (ii) strip and streaked loosening cultivation methods (and variation of this method applying satellite determination of position, RTK system). In this paper, total number of bacteria, soil respiration, biomass carbon and nitrogen, net nitrification, and dehydrogenase activity were measured under irrigated and non-irrigated conditions. The aim of the research was to evaluate the effects of the various cultivation methods. Soil samples were collected in spring (May) and autumn (September). Microbiological effects on the soil resulted from various cultivation methods were compared. Results demonstrate that the loosening cultivation method (strip tillage with loosening) exerts a more favorable effect on the parameters of soil biological activity than the conventional ploughing system. The most significant effect of loosening cultivation system was experienced in the increase of microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN) by over 80%, along with an intensified dehydrogenase activity. Loosening system yielded positive effects on the other examined biological parameters, except for the total bacteria number and soil respiration.
D. A. Lowy, Bence Mátyás
DRC Sustainable Future: Journal of Environment, Agriculture, and Energy pp 1-6; doi:10.37281/drcsf/1.1.1

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