Journal of Agroindustry Systems

Journal Information
EISSN : 2674-7464
Published by: Grupo Verde de Agroecologia e Abelhas (10.18378)
Total articles ≅ 7
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Francisco Tomaz De Oliveira, Vander Mendonça, Oscar Mariano Hafle, Joserlan Nonato Moreira, Ednaldo Barbosa Pereira Júnior, , Marcelo Cleon De Castro Silva,
Journal of Agroindustry Systems, Volume 2, pp 20-26; https://doi.org/10.18378/2018.v2i1.18

Abstract:
The volume of containers and the organic substrates are factors directly linked to the quality of seedlings. At this work, we conducted an experiment aiming to evaluate the effect of different organic sources and volumes of containers on the production of guava rootstocks. The experiment was realized from June to November 2011, at the Experimental Farm of the Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Paraíba (IFPB), Sousa-PB, Brazil. We used a randomized block in a 3x4 factorial design. The first factor was the organic substrate, with three treatments (cattle manure, sheep manure and earthworm castings), and the second factor consisted of four container volumes (635 mL, 1285 mL, 1800 mL and 3300 mL). Each treatment was replicated four times. The evaluated characteristics were: shoot length, shoot diameter, dry shoot matter and macronutrient contents (N, P, K, Ca, Mg and S) in the aerial dry shoot mass. Based on the results, we recommend a volume of containers of 1285 mL for guava rootstocks, regardless of the organic substrate. The variation in the volume of the containers provided differences in the growth of the rootstocks and the accumulation of N, P, Ca and Mg in the dry mass of the aerial part.
Journal of Agroindustry Systems, Volume 2, pp 27-35; https://doi.org/10.18378/2018.v2i1.21

Abstract:
There are secondary components of the nectar or the pollen in some vegetal species, to can be toxics or repellentsfor their pollinators. Thus, this work had for objective to study the effects from toxicity of differents concentrationsof macerated flowers of purpleJurubebaandwhite Jurubeba, as feeding of Africanized bees in a controlled environment.Therefore, wererealizedbioassays at the Laboratory of Entomology of the Federal University of Campina Grande, Campus ofPombal.It was used dried and crushed flowers of the Chamber and leaddy. The powder of the flowers was weighed in three different fractions (0,25%, 0,50% e 1,0%) and added to the candyandwater. The newly emerged workers were distributed togetherof 20 insects for wood boxmeasuring 11cm in length by 11cm in width and 7cm in height, in three replicates and control, making up 12 boxes and 240 worker bees, were packaged in B. O. D with temperature adjusted to 32º C andhumidity of 70 %. The control group received only candy and water. In view of the results obtained with the research, observed that the bees of the control remained alive until the 25 days reaching a statistical average of 20 days and for those treated with 0,25%, 0,50% e 1,0% respectively, presented mortality in the 20th, 18th e 13th day for bees fed with Solanum paniculatum L.For bees fed Solanum albidum Dun, observed that the bees of the control remain alive up to the 21 days reaching a statistical average of 18 days and for those treated with 0,25%, 0,50% and 1,0% respectively, presented mortality in the 17th, 13th e 12th day.The data analysis showed statistically significant differences between treatments and control, suggesting the toxic effect of the macerate obtained from Solanum paniculatum LandSolanum albidum Dunfor Africanized bees workersApismellifera. Thus, can be concluded with the accomplishment of this work that:The bees control remained alive until the 25thand 21th dayrespectively, by treatments with Solanum paniculatum L.andSolanum albidum Dun; The treated beeswith the concentrations 0,25%, 0,50% and 1,0% of macerated flowers Solanum paniculatum L, respectively, presented mortality to the 20th, 18thand 13thday; The treated bees with the concentrations 0,25%, 0,50% and 1,0% of macerated flowers Solanum albidum Dun, respectively, presented mortality to the 17th, 13thand 12th day; Flowers of Solanum paniculatum L. andSolanum albidum Dunpresented toxicity to Apismelíferaunder controlled ambient conditions
Marcos Barros De Medeiros, Sergio Batista Alves, Aline De Holanda Nunes Maia, Sinval Silveira Neto
Journal of Agroindustry Systems, Volume 2, pp 01-10; https://doi.org/10.18378/2018.v2i1.7

Abstract:
Two assays were conducted to evaluate the effect of biofertilizer suspensions applied to Canavalia ensiformis (L.) DC. plants on Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes) bioecology. In the first assay (residual effect), the following treatments were tested: a) Distilled water (Control); b) Biofert - biofertilizer produced in a single bioreactor; c) Biomix – a mix of biofertilizers produced in four bioreactors; and d) Bio+VL - Biofert + Verticillium lecaniiI (Zimm.) Viégas. In the second assay (systemic effect) only two suspensions were tested: a) Biofert and b) Distilled water (control). In the first assay, the biofertilizer was applied once on the whole plant and mites were confined in arenas on both leaflets. In the second assay, the plants were sprayed weekly only in one leaflet and the mites were confined in arenas on the non-sprayed leaflet. In both bioassays, bioecological parameters related to survival and oviposition were evaluated. The biofertilizer effects on potential population growth during the first generation were measured by fertility life table parameters (net reproductive rate (Ro), mean generation time (T), doubling time (DT), intrinsic rate of increase (Rm) and finite rate of increase (). The biofertilizer had adverse effects on both survival and oviposition parameters. The net reproduction rates (Ro) were of 18.1; 12.9; 12.5 and 10.5 females/female (assay I) and 19.4 and 13.0 females/female (assay II), respectively for the treatments in the above-mentioned orders. These results show that the biofertilizer reduced the potential population growth of B. phoenicis in either residual or systemic effect assays.
Journal of Agroindustry Systems, Volume 2, pp 11-19; https://doi.org/10.18378/2018.v2i1.17

Abstract:
In mid80ths, Brazil began to promote economic activities, increasing investment in new technologies as a more effective political strategy. During this period occurred the emergence of cooperatives, a system based on economic and social perspectives. The study investigatesthe management model implemented by the COOPERVIDA – ( Service Advisory Cooperative) from 1999 to 2018. We collected dataaboutthe tools used by the cooperative in its daily management and operation from the perspective of administration. The case study comprised two steps: exploratory research and data analysis. The information validatedby applying interviewswith semi-structuredquestionnaires to cooperative’spartners. Throughout itshistory, the institution had 18 directors, nineadministrative and ninefinancial coordination, and quite diverse membership composition. Agronomy engineers assumed most of the mandates for director function over the history of COOPERVIDA.Only three mandates were occupied by women,two administrative and one financial coordination
, Sergio Batista Alves, Aline De Holanda Nunes Maia, Maria Jose Araujo Wanderley, Sinval Silveira Neto
Journal of Agroindustry Systems, Volume 1; https://doi.org/10.18378/2018.v1i01.19

Abstract:
This study was conducted aiming to evaluate interactions between deleterious action of biofertilizers on Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes) (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) and host plants. In the first bioassay the following concentrations were tested: 0% (control), 5%, 15%, 30% and 50%. The experimental unit was a leaf of Ligustrum lucidum plant (six leaves per treatment). Twelve mites were liberated in arenas on each leaf. The second bioassay was run on 20 days old Canavalia ensiformis plants, using ten plants per treatment. Ten mites were transferred for arenas on each host plant cotyledonal leaf. Five concentrations were also tested: 0%, 5%; 10%; 20% and 30%. The adult female mortality and the number of eggs laid in each arena were quantified daily during 72 h in the first assay and 120 h in the second one. The mite survivorship and oviposition were significantly reduced with the increase of biofertilizer concentration in both experiments. The LC25 estimates for the 24, 48 and 72 h periods were respectively 50,04; 15,70 and 4,95% in L. lucidum. The LC25 andLC50 estimates for the 24, 48, 72,96 and 120 h periods in C. ensiformis were 8,15; 7,78; 0,63; 0,68 and 0,63 and of 19,64; 19,03; 2,38; 2,60 and 2,67, respectively. No LC50estimates were obtained in L. lucidum, due the low mortality rates. The biofertilizer had deleterious action on fertility and survival of B. phoenicison both host plants, being more severe on C. ensiformis. The mites dead by the biofertilizer action showed evidences of microbial colonization. A colloidal compound of the biofertilizer induced mite immobilization and obstruction in its digestive tract.
Journal of Agroindustry Systems, Volume 1; https://doi.org/10.18378/2018.v1i01.3

Abstract:
The granting of water use rights is a control instrument of the Brazilian Water Resources Policy (Law Nº. 9,433/97). According to the Law Nº. 9,433/97, human supply and animal watering are priority uses. Information on water input and output in water system are fundamental for effective management control. This work aims to estimate the human and livestock use of water in the rural zone of Alto Paraíba Region and Taperoá River Sub-basin, both belonging to the Paraíba river Basin, Paraíba, Brazil. We compare the proportion of water consumption versus total demand in the sector. We used the database of the 2006 Agricultural Census and population data for 2007 and 2010, from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics – IBGE, and the information of availability water indexes by the 2006 State Plan of Water Resources of Paraíba - PERH of 2006, which provides the demands of water in the studied hydrographic region.
Journal of Agroindustry Systems, Volume 1; https://doi.org/10.18378/2018.v1i01.2

Abstract:
This study aimed to evaluate the floristic composition and the phytosociological structure in two apiaries areas on Caatinga biome: a non-preserved and a preserved area both in the municipality of Aparecida, PB, Brazil. The non-preserved area (area I) had 25 apiaries, and the preserved area had 28 apiaries (area II). A total of 110 individuals, five families, and ten species were found at area I, and 330 individuals, eight families and 12 species at area II. However, area I showed higher Shannon-Wiener diversity index (1.93) than area II (1.52). The deforestation is responsible by the low number of individuals at the area I. Our results show a diversity of shrubs and trees species with great apicultural potential to be used by family farmers from the planning of the beekeeping activity.
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