Global Clinical and Translational Research

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 2641-7154 / 2643-8151
Total articles ≅ 38
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Fengyu Zhang , Michael Waters
Global Clinical and Translational Research pp 107-126; doi:10.36316/gcatr.02.0037

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Ruiping Li, Fengyu Zhang , Claude Hughes, Jianxin Li
Global Clinical and Translational Research pp 100-106; doi:10.36316/gcatr.02.0036

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Xiaowei Qiu, Yehong Tian, Xin Jiang, Qiaoli Zhang, Jinchang Huang
Global Clinical and Translational Research pp 85-99; doi:10.36316/gcatr.02.0035

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Cuicui Xia
Global Clinical and Translational Research pp 78-84; doi:10.36316/gcatr.02.0034

Abstract:
Hypertension is a leading chronic risk for population health in China, especially for older and middle-aged adults. However, a representative estimate of hypertension prevalence lacks for general older populations. With datasets from the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Study (CLHLS) and China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS), two nationally representative longitudinal surveys, this report aims to provide some estimates of hypertension prevalence in older and middle-aged adults overall and by social and demographic variables. There had been a marked increase in hypertension prevalence from 41% to 52% among older adults over the past two decades. Older adults, who were females, with urban residence, high income, from eastern China, and engaged in non-agricultural work, were more likely to be hypertensive. About 30% of middle-aged people in China were suffering from hypertension. These findings are significant in identifying potentially vulnerable populations with hypertension, which may have implications for clinical intervention.
Mei Peng, Jian Huang, Yiling Ding
Global Clinical and Translational Research pp 73-77; doi:10.36316/gcatr.02.0033

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Fengyu Zhang , Claude Hughes
Global Clinical and Translational Research pp 54-72; doi:10.36316/gcatr.02.0032

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Global Clinical and Translational Research; doi:10.36316/02.0031

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Vojislav Kišić, Jennifer Parish
Global Clinical and Translational Research pp 38-45; doi:10.36316/gcatr.02.0029

Abstract:
Background: Misleading diagnostic results, including false-positives, potentially impact both the safety and efficacy profiles of radiopharmaceuticals used for diagnostic purposes. It is unclear, however, if false-positives occurring with radio-pharmaceuticals in lactating breasts are regularly reported as adverse events. Methods: Scientific medical literature (PubMed and Google Scholar) and the EudraVigilance database of suspected adverse drug reaction reports were searched for case reports of false-positives with radiopharmaceuticals appearing in lactating breasts. Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) was reviewed for terms that could be used to capture reports of false-positives occurring in breast nuclear imaging accurately. Results: Literature searches showed that 40 case reports of false-positives have been observed with radiopharmaceuticals in lactating breasts but that these do not appear to be consistently reported to EudraVigilance as adverse events. MedDRA did not contain terms suitable for capturing false-positives in breasts with radiopharmaceuticals, but newly proposed terms were all approved. Conclusion: Increased reporting of false-positives as adverse events could help further clarify the safety specification of radiopharmaceuticals.
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