Journal of Fisheries Science

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EISSN : 2661-3387
Published by: Bilingual Publishing Co. (10.30564)
Total articles ≅ 31
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Tanzina Nazia,
Journal of Fisheries Science, Volume 3; https://doi.org/10.30564/jfsr.v3i2.3371

Abstract:
Aquaculture in pond and floodplain was accelerated in Bangladesh in the 1990s as a means of better production and income which was backed by the donor agencies, NGOs, and the government. Currently, the commercial actors are involved in the aquaculture systems due to the availability of production technologies and inputs. This paper aims to explore how the commercialization and privatization of floodplain aquaculture become the cause of the sufferings of the natural resource-dependent people and biodiversity loss in the floodplains. Now, Influential people hold control of the common pool floodplains and restricted the access of the Small-Scale Fishers (SSF) to manage the aquaculture. Our findings suggest that the SSF, for whom the seasonal floodplains were an important source of livelihood, their livelihood has been destroyed and overall wellbeing have been negatively affected. Besides that, lending enough evidence to the increased inequality, a new group of poor has emerged. Because instead of ensuring the welfare of SSF, Bangladesh government has leased the floodplain lands to the powerful rich people. In addition to growing inequalities, natural resource degradation has welcomed social vulnerabilities. However, no development initiative will ever be sustainable and effective if the existing socio-ecological setting is not considered. Bangladesh government should take robust attempts to revisit fisheries policies to ensure livelihood resilience of fisheries resource-dependent community by managing the access rights of the common pool resources.
Bindu Panicker
Journal of Fisheries Science, Volume 3; https://doi.org/10.30564/jfsr.v3i1.3253

Abstract:
Condition indices study like RNA content, DNA content, RNA: DNA, RNA: protein, RNA: lipid was carried out in goby, Parachaeturichthys ocellatus from the creeks of Mumbai to assess its nutritional status in different months. The study was carried out from June 2010 to September 2011.The range of RNA content in male was 72-185.6 µg/100 mg while in female was 82-145.46 µg/100 mg. RNA content was high during spawning months. The DNA content showed slight variations with range of 22.56- 39.31 µg/100 mg in males and 25.20-32.52 µg/100 mg in females. The range of ratio of RNA: DNA in males was 2.08-5.13 with an average of 3.74 while in female was 2.92-5.07 with an average of 3.99. The ratio above 2 indicates good condition. The RNA: protein showed an average of 0.0015 in males and 0.0017 in females while the average of RNA: lipid was 0.0176 in males and 0.0127 in females. RNA: protein and RNA: lipid showed the lowest values in post reproductive stages while it increased with the onset of reproductive cycles. The condition indices study showed that P. ocellatus was in good condition throughout the year and the creeks of Mumbai were suitable habitat for feeding and reproduction.
Katrina L. Canon, Plutomeo M. Nieves, Antonino B. Mendoza Jr., John Christopher C. Nolial, Niño C. Celestial, Ronnie O. Mediario, Raul G. Bradecina, Teresa N. Avila, Satoshi Kubota
Journal of Fisheries Science, Volume 3; https://doi.org/10.30564/jfsr.v3i1.3010

Abstract:
Anguillids are а valuable fish commodity worldwide. Although Anguilla luzonensis have been abundantly found in the northern Philippines and collected for trade, no available records show that it recruited in the mid-part where Lagonoy Gulf, Bicol is situated. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of A. luzonensis in the tributaries along the Lagonoy Gulf, Philippines using molecular tools. Glass eel specimens were collected in 2018–2019 from the Comun river, Albay; the Lagonoy river, Camarines Sur; and the Bato river, Catanduanes. For the first time, A. luzonensis was identified by molecular analysis in the Lagonoy Gulf. A. luzonensis was the second most abundant species in the Comun and Lagonoy rivers (9.5 and 22.4 %, respectively). Anguilla luzonensis collected from the Comun and Lagonoy rivers did not show a significant difference (FST= 0.00825, p>0.05). Anguilla marmorata was the most dominant species in all tributaries (71.1–98.0 %). In the Comun and Lagonoy rivers, A. bicolor pacifica was the third most abundant species (7.7 and 6.5%, respectively). In addition, Anguilla celebesensis was only found rarely in the Comun river (0.9 %). This study provides important information for sustainable resource management and effective utilization of the eel species in these regions.
Abhishek Bharadwaj R, Devi Prasad A.G
Journal of Fisheries Science, Volume 3; https://doi.org/10.30564/jfsr.v3i1.3270

Abstract:
The ichthyofaunal diversity is an excellent bio indicator of the status and health of aquatic ecosystems. The present study elucidates the ichthyofaunal diversity of Sasihithlu estuary in the west coast of Karnataka, India. The study was conducted from January 2019 to January 2020. Field explorations in estuary were undertaken on a monthly basis. A detailed analysis of piscine diversity revealed a total of 63 species of fresh water, estuary and marine fish belonging to 13 orders and 37 families. Perciformes was found to be a predominant order with 20 families and 31 species. Of the recorded species, one is Vulnerable and two are Near Threatened species. The greater diversity of fish was recorded during monsoon and the lesser diversity was recorded during winter.
Waluyo Waluyo, Taslim Arifin
Journal of Fisheries Science, Volume 3; https://doi.org/10.30564/jfsr.v3i1.2466

Abstract:
The distribution of lobsters in Indonesian waters is very wide, even lobster species in Indonesia are also scattered in the tropical waters of the western Pacific Ocean, the Indian Ocean, Africa to Japanese waters. Indonesian waters are divided into 11 (eleven) Fishery Management Zone (FMZ). Lobsters in Indonesia may come from various water areas, both national and regional water zones, and they’re called the sink population. Its spread is influenced by the movement of the current. Lobster seed is nurtured by nature through ocean currents from Australia, East Indonesia, Japan, then back to Australia. Lobsters have a complex life cycle, where adult lobsters inhabit coral reefs as a place to lay eggs, then hatch into planktonic larvae, and grow up in open seas and carry out diurnal and ontogenetic vertical migrations before returning to nurseries in shallow coastal areas and reefs, coral, as well as habitat by the type of species. Literature research had used at least two methodologies to estimate the distribution and connection sensitivity matrices of marine organism larvae. The two most common approaches are using genetic markers and numerical biophysical modeling. Thus, this research uses molecular genetic techniques to explain the genetic structure of lobster populations using a biophysical model approach that can explain the genetic structure of lobsters, as well as the distribution based on regional oceanographic synthesis data and lobster biology known in Indonesian waters. This model has four components, namely: 1) a benthic module based on a Geographical Information System (GIS) which is a lobster habitat in the spawning and recruitment process, 2) a physical oceanography module containing daily velocity in the form of a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model, 3) a larva biology module that describes larval life history characteristics, and 4) a Lagrangian Stochastic module that tracks the individual trajectories of larvae.
Ivaney Dos Santos Cardoso, Elaine Vasconcelos Bezerra Alves, , Ana Célia Barbosa Guedes, Luã Caldas De Oliveira, Manoel Luciano Aviz De Quadros, Débora Tatyane Oliveira Xavier, Altevir Signor, Fabricio Nilo Lima Da Silva
Journal of Fisheries Science, Volume 3; https://doi.org/10.30564/jfsr.v3i1.3290

Abstract:
The fishing and ostreiculture activities practiced in the coast of the Eastern Amazon in the state of Pará, Brazil, became important to be inserted in rural education. Thus, this literature review aimed to realize a brief theoretical discussion about the important aspects of rural education in promoting the development of fishing and osteiculture. For the accomplishment of the literary research it was sought to explain the definition in education; rural education and valorization of the rural environment; environmental education as a transversal theme; fishing and aquaculture as a teaching strategy; considerations of fishing and ostreiculture; challenges and perspectives of the teaching of fishing and aquaculture in education; and booklet as a pedagogical tool in education. In conclusion, the use of fishing and ostreiculture as a strategy for rural schools through environmental education is important to foster fishing activity in communities, as well as the sustainable use of natural resources.
Shawon Ahmmed, Latiful Islam, Mizanur Rahman Washim, Nilufa Begum
Journal of Fisheries Science, Volume 3; https://doi.org/10.30564/jfsr.v3i1.3240

Abstract:
Shrimp recognized as the white gold of Bangladesh because it is the second largest export earning product after garments sector. The brown shrimp (M. monoceros) have high growth rates together with that they tolerate wide ranges of salinity and environmental parameters which makes them highly attractive for culture purposes. The purposes of this research were to assess the culture performance and economic profitability of brown shrimp (Metapenaeus monoceros) in brackish water ponds. This research lasted from February to June 2020 under three different stocking densities such as 35, 45 and 55 individuals/m2 in treatments T1, T2 and T3 at Bangladesh Fisheries Research Institute, Brackishwater Station, Paikgacha, Khulna. After 90 days culture periods the total production was 1703.32±144.48, 2768.25±167.63 and 2535.03±253.52 kg/ha in T1, T2 and T3 respectively which was significantly higher (p<0.05) in T2 compared to T1 and T2. Benefit cost ratio (BCR) was 0.32, 0.87 and 0.52 in T1, T2 and T3 respectively and found significantly higher (p<0.05) in T2 than T1and T3. Both culture performance and economic analysis implies that brown shrimp (M. monoceros) with a stocking density of 450000 individuals/ha might be environment conciliatory and economically enduring in coastal areas of Bangladesh.
Megan N. Moran, Thomas F. Schulz, Daniel Rittschof
Journal of Fisheries Science, Volume 2; https://doi.org/10.30564/jfsr.v2i2.2438

Abstract:
Atlantic blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) are ecologically and commercially fundamental. Life stages are punctuated with migration. Adults and juveniles live in estuaries and sounds. Larval stages develop in the coastal ocean. Juvenile and adult crabs occupy habitats from high salinities to fresh water. We determined whether maturing juvenile and adult blue crab habitat use is reflected in mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 haplotypes. High salinity crabs had lower haplotype diversity (0.7260 ± .03900) compared to spawning crabs (0.9841 ± .00021) and low salinity crabs (0.94154 ± .00118). Significant pairwise differences in haplotypes were found between high salinity and spawning crabs (Nm = 0.26018, p < 0.001), and between high salinity and low salinity crabs (Nm = 0.19482, p < 0.001) indicating a lack of gene flow. Crabs from high salinity had highly significant genetic differentiation compared to spawning crabs (Fst = 0.11830, p < 0.001) and low salinity crabs (Fst = 0.09689, p < 0.001). Results support the hypothesis that genetics influence habitat selection. Crab larvae mix in the coastal ocean but occupy specific habitats upon return to sounds and estuaries. These findings have implications for the management of fisheries.
Mahibul Islam, Mahmudul Hasan, Bhaskar Chandra Majudmar, Sulav Indra Paul
Journal of Fisheries Science, Volume 2; https://doi.org/10.30564/jfsr.v2i2.1906

Abstract:
Plastic debris is an emerging environmental threat all over the world. But its effect and distribution in the marine ecosystem is barely known. Microplastics abundance in the marine vegetated area is about 2 to 3 times higher than the bare site in the ocean. Although seagrass meadows trap huge amount of microplastics over the ocean floor, a considerable amount of microplastics are also sink incorporating with the marine aggregates from the epipelagic zone of the ocean. Scavenging of microplastics by diatom aggregation decreases the sinking rate of them rather than cryptophyte. As we know, marine snow is the leading carbon source for zoobenthos, but the ubiquitous presence of microplastics damages cell of different microalgae which may alter the food webs of marine ecosystems. Additionally, microplastics releases immense amount of dissolved organic carbons (DOC) in the surrounding seawater that stimulates the growth of heterotrophic microorganisms as well as their functional activity. Plastic debris result in outbreaks of disease in the marine environment and coral reefs are highly affected by it. When coral reef comes in contact with microplastics, the disease infestation rate of the reef increases massively. Three major disease viz., skeletal eroding band, white syndrome and black band of coral reef causes approximately 46% of reef mortality due to microplastics consumption. Due to complex structure and size, the corals accumulates huge amount of microplastics that increases growth of pathogens by hampering the coral immune system. Existing scientific evidence presents that exposure of microplastics in aquatic environments triggers a wide variety of toxic insult from feeding disruption to reproductive performance, disturbances in energy metabolism throughout the ocean. The present review focused on the ecotoxicological effect of microplastics on primary producers of ocean, its uptake, accumulation, and excretion, and its probable toxicity with risk assessment approaches.
Attobrah Justice, Aboagye Emmanuel Mensah, Afrane Sandylove, Ampah Dankwa Jeffrey
Journal of Fisheries Science, Volume 2; https://doi.org/10.30564/jfsr.v2i2.2116

Abstract:
Waters off the coasts of West Africa are very rich with many different types of fish and marine life. Some species like sardines, tuna, mackerel, tilapia and shrimps are important to many local communities and economies in West Africa. However, the current overfishing of these fish affects the sustainability of fishery industry. Despite Ghana ratifying to a number of international marine laws to ensure a sustainable marine fishing, there seem to be some challenges that are associated with marine fishing in Ghana. This paper further examines the strategies that have been employed by the fishing community and the fisheries ministry in Ghana as a response to restrictive measures for the challenges identified and discussed in literature. This paper is fundamentally an extensive review of marine fisheries literature. In general terms, it was found that, Ghana has ratified to a number of international marine laws including the UNCLOS.
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