Witness: The Canadian Journal of Critical Nursing Discourse

Journal Information
EISSN : 22915796
Current Publisher: York University Libraries (10.25071)
Total articles ≅ 28
Current Coverage
DOAJ
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Latest articles in this journal

Kim English
Witness: The Canadian Journal of Critical Nursing Discourse, Volume 2, pp 122-133; doi:10.25071/2291-5796.50

Abstract:
This reflection paper represents my own efforts at personal reconciliation as a settler nurse educator. A portion of these efforts include my analysis and experience of the current state of nursing academia within the context of our profession’s necessity to meet relevant calls to action stated within the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s report. Key issues such as problematic texts accepted as ‘nursing fundamentals’, the invisibility of Indigenous knowledge coupled with the perpetuation of colonial stereotypes are discussed within the context of Nbwaa-ka-win. The application of post-colonial theory as part of a strengths-based approach to the decolonization of nursing education is presented.
Sara Scott, Tracey L. Clancy, Carla Ferreira
Witness: The Canadian Journal of Critical Nursing Discourse, Volume 2, pp 111-121; doi:10.25071/2291-5796.49

Abstract:
The transformative experience of engaged presence in teaching and learning fosters trust and supports learners and teachers to explore, learn, and grow in their understanding of who they are becoming. Enacting presence in teaching becomes an act of care and creates an embodied space for learners to engage in authentic learning and enter the realm of self-authorship. Self-authorship encourages the cultivation of one’s internal voice to construct beliefs, identity, and social relationships to be able to give up one way of making meaning to adopt a deeper meaning (Baxter Magolda, 2009, 2014). This reflective writing circle captures the essence of a master’s student and two educators’ transformative learning as they journey together in relationship towards a deeper understanding of their Indigenous and Settler identities and respond to the Calls to Action. Keywords: presence, authentic learning, self-authorship, Calls to Action, writing circle
Bernice Downey
Witness: The Canadian Journal of Critical Nursing Discourse, Volume 2, pp 97-110; doi:10.25071/2291-5796.59

Abstract:
Health equity is defined in ways that espouse values of social justice and benevolence and is held up as an ideal state achievable by all. However, there remains a troubling gap in health outcomes between Indigenous Peoples and other Canadians. Public health stakeholders aspire to ‘close the gap’ and ‘level the gradient’ to reduce inequities though the implementation of various health equity focused strategies. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada echoes this objective and calls for self-determining structural reform to address health inequity for Indigenous Peoples. This paper proposes an IND-equity model as a reconciliation inspired response that upholds Indigenous self-determination and is informed by diverse Indigenous ways of knowing. When adopting this model, the goal is to complete the circle and foster wholistic balance. Further development and implementation of an IND-equity model requires advocacy by all health practitioners. Nurses hold potential to lead and engage in structural reform through an Indigenous health ally role.
Darlene Sanderson, Noeman Mirza, Mona Polacca, Andrea Kennedy, R. Lisa Bourque-Bearskin
Witness: The Canadian Journal of Critical Nursing Discourse, Volume 2, pp 66-83; doi:10.25071/2291-5796.55

Abstract:
Nurses have a duty to uphold the right to health. Clean water is vital for health as an inclusive right for all people, yet access is threatened by climate change. Complex impacts of colonization on climate change has resulted in two key problems: lack of clean water access by Indigenous Peoples and marginalization of Indigenous traditional teachings that support water protection. Indigenous teachings of living in harmony with Mother Earth are important contributions to global water policy and health solutions. Indigenous traditional laws on water protection may be understood through Indigenous water declarations. Nurses have an important opportunity to respect traditional teachings noting interconnections of health, water, and climate change to advance health. Water is life.
Paisly Michele Symenuk, Dawn Tisdale, Danielle H. Bourque Bearskin, Tessa Munro
Witness: The Canadian Journal of Critical Nursing Discourse, Volume 2, pp 84-96; doi:10.25071/2291-5796.51

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
De-Ann Sheppard
Witness: The Canadian Journal of Critical Nursing Discourse, Volume 2, pp 51-65; doi:10.25071/2291-5796.57

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Joanna Fraser, Evelyn Voyageur, Paul Willie, Patricia R. Woods, Victoria Dick, Kate Moynihan, Jennifer Spurr, Heather Mcansh, Cara Tilston, Heidi Deagle
Witness: The Canadian Journal of Critical Nursing Discourse, Volume 2, pp 25-38; doi:10.25071/2291-5796.54

Abstract:
The story of land-based immersion learning for nursing students in remote First Nations communities is told through the stories of ten authors. We represent a collaboration between First Nations Knowledge Keepers, nursing students, and nursing faculty. Our inquiry draws on Indigenous knowledge paradigms and research methodologies. Currently in the preliminary stages of gathering our findings, we are learning how transformation happens through culturally safe relationships and ethical learning spaces. We are learning that inquiry requires commitment, authenticity, and a respect for differences. Most importantly, we are learning that nurses need to uncover ingrained and colonized assumptions in order to imagine new possibilities for learning and inquiring with Indigenous people and communities.
Erica Samms Hurley, Margot Jackson
Witness: The Canadian Journal of Critical Nursing Discourse, Volume 2, pp 39-50; doi:10.25071/2291-5796.43

Abstract:
In this paper I explore the Mi’kmaq words Mist No’kmaq, which can be translated as ‘all my relations’. Msit No'kmaq is not only at the center of who I am as a person, but also who I am becoming as a researcher. Reflecting on how to honor all my relations within research, has allowed me to explore my beliefs about research, thereby developing a clear understanding of the purpose and intentions of engaging in Indigenous research. Rather than seeing researchers as insiders or outsiders within the context of Indigenous communities, I argue that it is important to engage in reflexive processes that make visible a researcher’s positionality and who they are and are becoming. *Keywords: Identity, positionality, Indigenous research, relations, relational accountability
Vanessa Van Bewer
Witness: The Canadian Journal of Critical Nursing Discourse, Volume 2, pp 9-10; doi:10.25071/2291-5796.47

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Vanessa Van Bewer, Roberta Woodgate, Donna Martin, Frank Deer
Witness: The Canadian Journal of Critical Nursing Discourse, Volume 2, pp 11-24; doi:10.25071/2291-5796.46

Abstract:
This paper explores the relevance of Indigenous perspectives within the nursing profession, and the importance of weaving these perspectives into nursing education. We suggest that Indigenous perspectives can support nursing’s core ethical values of relationality and holism and may hold representational and transformational possibilities for students and educators alike. Guided by principles of Indigenous learning, we provide several exemplars from Canadian schools of nursing that have already begun the process of decolonizing their programs. We conclude by describing some of the challenges and considerations that may arise when Indigenous perspectives and approaches are considered for inclusion into nursing education programs.
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