International Journal of Higher Education

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 1927-6044 / 1927-6052
Published by: Sciedu Press (10.5430)
Total articles ≅ 1,191
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Ruth N. Dlamini, Moses Onyemaechi Ede, Chinedu Ifedi Okeke
International Journal of Higher Education, Volume 11; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijhe.v11n4p1

Abstract:
This study explored current disciplinary practices by primary school teachers in Eswatini. A missed method design was employed using 48 primary teachers in the Hhohho region in the Kingdom of Eswatini. Instruments used were questionnaires and interviews. Data was collected and analyzed both quantitative and qualitatively. For analyzing data for questionnaires and observation, descriptive statistics such as frequencies and percentages were used and for analyzing data for interviews, thematic analysis was used. The findings of this study indicated that the participants are using guidance and counselling to discipline student as disciplinary measure. The study established that some disciplinary practises are not effective to curb students’ misbehaviour in schools such as corporal punishment and suspension. Conclusions arrived at indicate that public primary schools have adopted the use of guidance and counselling services. Few disciplinary practices were also found to be detrimental to academic performance. Therefore, this study suggested that guidance and counselling training should be given to all teachers. This therefore necessitates further investigation on the use of disciplinary practises and their impact towards the learner behaviour in all the four regions of Eswatini, since this study focuses in one region.
Hadya Abboud Abdel Fattah, Omar Melhem, Nathira Alhmaimat, Gehan Sallam
International Journal of Higher Education, Volume 11; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijhe.v11n4p12

Abstract:
Background: Higher education in field of Nursing in the United Arab Emirates faces many challenges regarding the increasing number of nursing students at the Baccalaureate level in nursing programs, which in fact, is a similar situation in all parts of the world (Saifan et al., 2021; Wollin & Fairweather, 2012 & Torregosa et al., 2015). Method: This qualitative research is intended to discover the perceptions of UAE nursing undergraduate students, along with their teaching faculty, regarding the recruitment policies within the nursing colleges of the UAE. The grounded theory constructivist approach was followed. In addition, the “Conceptual Model of Academic Performance” has explained the data analysis of the responses. A focus group interview has been conducted with ten nursing students who were in their third year and five nursing lecturers. These students are attending nursing colleges in Abu Dhabi. In order to gain a clear understanding of their impressions, an open-ended interview has been conducted about current recruitment policy (in general), with a focus on the IELTS and GAP (tests) requirements, ie: minimum scores. Conclusion: The findings indicate that students were dissatisfied with the requirement of “Band (6)” for the IELTS test score. They suggested decreasing this requirement to a band of 5 - 5.5 for accepted college admission requirements. They were, however, happy with the high school GPA policy whereby more consideration was given to some students, which minimizes the expectations while simultaneously increasing their chances of becoming Emirati qualified nurses. Furthermore, by easing the requirements, the UAE has helped in reducing the current nursing shortage.
Eyal Eckhaus, Nitza Davidovitch
International Journal of Higher Education, Volume 11; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijhe.v11n3p67

Abstract:
This study centers on a retrospective investigation of effective and pedagogic planning of academic digital courses taught during the COVID-19 crisis, from the students’ perspective. We shall focus on the difference between the traditional, teaching-centered paradigm, and the modern learning-centered approach, while emphasizing the formulation of learning outcomes in online study expanses, in light of the learning experience imposed on teachers and students at the various academic institutions.The study explored the learning outcomes from students’ point of view, as well as the benefits and challenges embodied by formulating learning goals in the post-COVID era, according to the learning-centered paradigm, relating to the strengths and weaknesses of the Zoom teaching method from the students’ perspective, predicated on 1,828 students from several institutions. We used a mixed methods design incorporating qualitative and quantitative analysis to develop the Online Teaching Recommendations (SOTR) model. We used Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) for goodness-of-fit.The research findings indicate that the various types of e-learning challenge academic institutions to carry out renewed thinking about the main potential advantage of physical academic institutions where students and teachers meet, talk, and discuss directly and unmediated, compared to virtual bodies of knowledge and teaching that are evolving at present and that are allegedly threatening to render universities irrelevant.
Stephanie Caroline Samuel, Ferina Marimuthu
International Journal of Higher Education, Volume 11; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijhe.v11n3p26

Abstract:
The successful completion of a module measures student performance at tertiary institutions through ascertaining predetermined pass percentages. The lack of conceptualization of content by a student, may affect the students’ academic achievement. This paper aimed to investigate students' perceptions on the factors that may impact Cost Accounting students' performance and determine if these factors have a significant association with a student’s performance. The independent variables identified were attendance, age, gender, grade 12 results and language, whilst the dependent variable was academic performance in the Cost Accounting module. Using a sample of 180 students registered for Cost Accounting II in their second year of study, the data collected from the questionnaires were analyzed with descriptive and inferential statistics. The study found that student attendance has a positive impact on student performance in the module. The findings of this study may be useful to higher education institutions and academics as it highlights the factors that influence students' academic achievement.
Ernest Kaninjing, Ivette A. Lopez, Che Wankie, Elizabeth O. Akin Odanye, Roland N. Ndip, Yussif M. Dokurugu, Nicholas Tendongfor, Felix Amissah, Shelley White Means, Christopher Paul, et al.
International Journal of Higher Education, Volume 11; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijhe.v11n3p1

Abstract:
The novel coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) caused disruptions in the delivery of higher education around the globe. To understand how universities and students are dealing with the sudden change from in-person course delivery to online format, this cross-sectional mixed-method study aimed to (a) ascertain the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on students’ ability to access online learning; (b) examine how college students adapted to changes in the learning/teaching environment; and (c) explore the students’ perspective on measures that institutions of higher learning could have adopted to ease the abrupt transition to online learning. Results indicate a majority of participants in the US reported access to internet and computers for off-campus learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. A little over half of participants from Africa reported internet access during the COVID-19 pandemic (82% of participants from Nigeria and 66.7% from Ghana). Participants from Cameroon reported the lowest percentage of access to online learning at 59.1%. Participants from Africa reported challenges in adapting to online format due to inadequate access to necessary technological resources such as a reliable internet and computer. Participants identified internal and external resources that could have been adopted to better deal with the transition to online learning. Institutions of higher learning can learn from their initial response to the COVID-19 pandemic to formulate and adjust policies that provide flexibility to effectively transition to online learning while catering to the social, educational and health needs of their students.
Folake Modupe Adelabu, Abongile Ngwabe,
International Journal of Higher Education, Volume 11; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijhe.v11n3p79

Abstract:
Objective: The study investigates first-year teacher education students’ self-directed learning through Computer-Aided Mathematics Instruction (CAMI).Methods: A total of 230 first-year mathematics teachers specialising in Further Education and Training (FET) phase teaching participated in the study, where responses from 50 student teachers were purposively and conveniently selected to report on in this paper. A qualitative research method approach was used and open–ended questionnaires were utilised to collect the data for first-year teacher education students’ self-directed learning. The questionnaires were analysed using descriptive data analysis.Results: Results of the study revealed that CAMI was used to monitor students’ learning, the time the learning takes place, the performance of the student within the duration of time, and to evaluate student performance. The results also revealed the skills that characterised self-directed learning and active learning where the student teachers were motivated to learn more and to solve difficult problems in mathematics.Conclusions: The study recommends technology integration, such as CAMI, in teacher education and teaching and learning in the Higher Education Institutions (HEIs), to promote self-directed learning and support effective learning for future learners.
Medson Mapuya, Awelani Melvin Rambuda
International Journal of Higher Education, Volume 11; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijhe.v11n3p90

Abstract:
Conducted against the backdrop of forced online learning imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic, this study sought to explore the learning experiences of accounting student teachers with digitally mediated learning. Anchored in phenomenological research design, focus group interviews were used to generate qualitative data from purposefully selected accounting student teachers while member checking was used for validation. Content analysis of data revealed sufficient concurrence in the phenomenological voices of students that they experienced anxiety, stress, isolation, demotivation and lack of contact with their classmates. In mitigation of these experiences, the study recommends that lecturers need to develop learning material with which students can interact meaningfully, and create and maintain a live, interactive virtual learning environment in which student learning is monitored and evaluated continuously. The students appreciated the flexibility of digitally mediated learning and its provision for real opportunities for learning beyond the physical learning environment. The study found that digitally mediated learning creates a platform for a creative, innovative and non-contact learning environment in the new educational dispensation of the COVID-19 pandemic era. It therefore calls for a radical paradigm shift in the pedagogical assumptions and practices of lecturers towards a student-centred virtual learning environment which thrives on digital technology.
Godfrey Bagonza, Yuda Taddeo Kaahwa, Nicholas Itaaga
International Journal of Higher Education, Volume 11; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijhe.v11n3p110

Abstract:
Access to university education is one of the fundamental educational questions in contemporary educational debates. This is because university education is seen as having an array of benefits to individuals, their households, and their nations. However, the challenge of inequality in terms of gender, income, location, and socio-economic status has constrained some individuals and households to access quality university education. In 2005 the government of Uganda introduced the District Quota Scheme to address the social inequalities in accessing university education. This study examined how the District Quota Scheme is addressing the rural-urban divide in access to university; how the District Quota Scheme has increased access to university education for children with parents who have low levels of education; and whether the District Quota Scheme is improving access to university education for children from low-income families. Following the social constructivist research paradigm and integrating both quantitative and qualitative research methods, the study found a change in access to university education by students from rural areas, students whose parents have lower levels of education, and those from low-income families as a result of introducing the District Quota Scheme. The study recommends that the government of Uganda and other stakeholders in the higher education sector should address the structural challenges to ensure that mainly the socially disadvantaged students take the biggest advantage of this scheme.
Reem Al-Rubaie
International Journal of Higher Education, Volume 11; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijhe.v11n3p121

Abstract:
This paper presents a case study of a competitive debate program designed for teachers-in-training at the Basic Education College in Kuwait. Stakeholders at different levels have expressed an interest in introducing more constructivist-based pedagogies into the Kuwaiti national education system, but institutional and ideological challenges have hindered implementation. Teachers at the college designed and implemented a debate program based on constructivist principles of authenticity, student meaning-making, collaboration, and high performance expectations. Survey data suggest that participants experienced debate as a transformative experience, changing their perception of themselves, of the world, and of their ability to effect change in it. Participants came to imagine themselves as future system leaders preparing future generations with higher-order skills involving complex solving, which an increasingly complex social reality demanded. From 2015 to 2018, a group of professors formed debate teams at the Kuwait University National English Debate League. This endeavour formed the empirical research presented here as evidence to support a move from instructivist teaching to constructivist learning for future teachers in Kuwait.
Sharon Zunckel, Mbali Portia Msomi, Stephanie Caroline Samuel, Ferina Marimuthu
International Journal of Higher Education, Volume 11; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijhe.v11n3p130

Abstract:
A switch to emergency remote teaching, learning, and assessment (TLA) has become necessary as a result of the social distancing brought about by the recent COVID-19 pandemic. Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) were forced to switch from face-to-face to online teaching and learning to ensure successful completion of the academic year as well as the safety of their staff and students from a global pandemic. This arrangement has created teaching problems in terms of familiarizing oneself with technology, losing face-to-face contact, and limiting access to essential facilities such as laboratories and libraries. The new normal is when remote learning is employed to fulfil TLA obligations. Therefore, students are expected to adjust from a traditional to a remote learning environment. This change in environment highlights the importance of exploring students’ perceptions as the recipients of this novel learning. Hence, the aim of this study was to explore the impact that the COVID-19 pandemic has had on student learning, underpinned by the activity theory. Quantitative research methods were applied to elicit students’ perceptions of remote learning through the use of an online questionnaire. The target population comprised undergraduate management accounting students. The paper provides interesting implications for government, policymakers, regulatory bodies, and other researchers because it offers a student perspective on the challenges experienced with remote learning.
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