Vilnius University Open Series

Journal Information
EISSN : 2669-0535
Current Publisher: Vilnius University Press (10.15388)
Total articles ≅ 29
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Julie Seymour
Vilnius University Open Series pp 21-29; doi:10.15388/10.15388/os.2020.1

Abstract:
The chapter provides a conceptual framework in which to understand empirical data on families and migration. By focusing on the family, rather than the individual in migration research, theories and concepts from family and childhood studies can explain the experiences of the wider group of people who are involved in, and impacted by migration. The chapter shows how viewing the family as involved a process of dynamic family practices allows the data in this book to reveal the engaged and committed ways that people conduct their family life despite being separated by long distances.
Irena Juozeliūnienė
Vilnius University Open Series pp 31-48; doi:10.15388/os.2020.2

Abstract:
This chapter aims to place the study of Lithuanian transnational families within a broader body of the most recent theoretical frames through which to understand personal lives, family practices and the ways family relationships could be perceived as ‘troubled’. The author provides a short overview of theoretical approaches and research methodologies used at the Department of Sociology at Vilnius University since 2004 to frame the study of transnational families in Lithuania.
Laima Žilinskienė
Vilnius University Open Series pp 155-180; doi:10.15388/os.2020.8

Abstract:
This chapter present the importance of memory making in migrant families lives and how emigrants ‘do’ family memory. A representative survey of Lithuanian residents shows that those with emigration experience since 1990 participate in family memory construction more actively. The development of such communicative family memory is family work which demonstrates family solidarity and occurs between and within generations. However, this research shows that gender, age and location influence who is involved in this process with men and younger family members less likely to participate.
Irena Juozeliūnienė, Indrė Bielevičiūtė
Vilnius University Open Series pp 51-62; doi:10.15388/os.2020.3

Abstract:
This chapter set up to examine the language of ‘family’ in key policy documents regulating family life in Lithuania. Drawing on theoretical ideas of Ribbens McCarthy the authors look into the ways of framing of family life, identify scripts of ‘normal’ family, and analyse how these, in turn, sought to portray migrant families as ‘troubling’. The research presented here was carried out in January-May 2018 and formed a sub-study of the project ‘Global Migration and Lithuanian Family: Family practices, circulation of care and return strategies’ (2017–2019) funded by the Lithuanian Research Council. Analysis of the strategic policy documents regulating family life in Lithuania in the period from 1995 to 2018 has revealed that the imagined orders of family life evolve over time, which explains the changes in the language used to describe family lives. The authors have identified the ways of portraying Lithuanian ‘family’ as ‘normal’, ‘harmonious’, and ‘sovereign’, and examined how legislators ‘troubled’ migrant families or – in a long run – depicted them as ‘sovereign, but silenced’ and as ‘important, but mysterious’.
Irena Juozeliūnienė, Julie Seymour
Vilnius University Open Series pp 1-186; doi:10.15388/openseries.2020.19665

Abstract:
This edited collection opens the door to understanding the representations and experiences of Lithuanian migrant families. The authors aim to highlight the most recent theoretical frames through which to understand the personal lives, family practices of migrants, and the ways family relationships could be perceived as ‘troubled’. The authors test and extend these ideas about family life with a focus on gender and intergenerational issues in the context of Lithuanian families across borders.
Irena Juozeliūnienė, Gintė Martinkėnė, Irma Budginaitė-Mačkinė
Vilnius University Open Series pp 127-154; doi:10.15388/os.2020.7

Abstract:
This chapter is set up to incorporate Finch’s idea of ‘display’ to examine how migrant parents, adult migrant children, and close significant persons perform a set of actions to convey to each other and the society at large that these are family-doing activities. The authors sought to demonstrate that the concept of ‘display’ could be applied to analyze transnational practices of parenting and caring for elderly parents in a quantitative way. The chapter draws on the data from a quotabased survey (N = 304) of three types of transnational families: mother-away and father-away with under-aged children living in Lithuania and adult child-away with elderly parents needing care living in Lithuania. The study was carried out in August 2018 as part of the research project ‘Global Migration and Lithuanian Family: Family Practices, Circulation of Care, and the Return Strategies’.
Irena Juozeliūnienė, Indrė Bielevičiūtė, Irma Budginaitė-Mačkinė
Vilnius University Open Series pp 64-75; doi:10.15388/os.2020.4

Abstract:
In this chapter the authors set out to examine how migrant families are named and framed in academic publications by Lithuanian researchers published from 2004 to 2017, available in Lithuanian and international academic databases. The authors aim to disclose how Lithuanian academics perceive the change of family boundaries and fluidity of family relations in the context of global migration, and how the meanings of ‘change’ are used within academic publications that have sought to define the migrant family life as ‘troubling’. The analysis of publications presented in this chapter was carried out from January to March 2018. It formed a sub-study of the research project ‘Global Migration and Lithuanian Family: Family Practices, Circulation of Care, and Return Strategies’ (2017–2019), funded by the Lithuanian Research Council. The analysis has revealed that Lithuanian researchers portray migrant families as extended in space, liquid, networked, survived, but unsecure because of ongoing risks as well as experiencing ‘losses’ or/ and ‘gains’. The researchers conclude that portraits presented by the academics are framed by the family ideology, while naming of migrant families highly rely on the images of ‘how a family should be’.
Irena Juozeliūnienė, Indrė Bielevičiūtė, Irma Budginaitė-Mačkinė
Vilnius University Open Series pp 77-96; doi:10.15388/os.2020.5

Abstract:
In this chapter the authors examine how parenting in migration context is portrayed in the academic discourse in Lithuania. The authors reveal the depictions of migration-induced child caring practices, based on the results of analysis of academic publications (2004–2017) carried out from January to March 2018 as part of the sub-study of the research project ‘Global Migration and Lithuanian Family: Family Practices, Circulation of Care, and the Return Strategies’. The chapter focus on the portrayal of parenting within the host country, after return from emigration and in transnational family settings. The analysis reveals how value judgements about family life rooted in the low mobility discourse are reproduced in academic publications on family and migration and lead the researchers to portray parenting in migration as ‘troubling’.
Ivona Georgieva, Slavka Georgieva
Vilnius University Open Series pp 12-18; doi:10.15388/openseries.2019.18398

Abstract:
The article focuses on some of the aspects of conflicts within the organization. Issues leading to conflicts are discussed as an integral part of organizational life. The main types of conflicts are characterized. It is emphasized that regardless of the outcome of the conflict, its consequences have a certain impact and that each organization could benefit even from the conflict. There is no universal way of correct resolution, it depends on the conflict itself, the individual characteristics of each of the team members and, above all, the correct approach of the leaders. Failure to listen and downplaying the other side does not solve the problem. The best way out of conflict is solving the problem that caused the conflict.
Laura Jančiauskaitė, Kristina Lasickaitė, Austė Ripkauskaitė
Vilnius University Open Series pp 19-26; doi:10.15388/openseries.2019.18399

Abstract:
In a modern world sustainable business development is the adaptation of strategies and actions in order to meet the needs of the organization and society for nature conservation, social welfare and economy. Increasing concern for environmental and social issues commit business to take responsibility and adopt sustainable development principles into strategic management. The research on corporate sustainability examined in this article shows significant relationship of sustainable business between the company's reputation and customers behaviour, while brand image takes the mediating role on all of them. The following theoretical model was created: the impact of corporate sustainability on customer perceived corporate reputation and customer buying decision behaviour shows the relation between these determinants.
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