Journal of Leadership, Accountability and Ethics

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 1913-8059 / 1913-8059
Published by: North American Business Press (10.33423)
Total articles ≅ 214
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Maria Claudia Trajano Marques De Souza Santos, Thais Jurema Silva
Journal of Leadership, Accountability and Ethics, Volume 18; https://doi.org/10.33423/jlae.v18i4.4611

Abstract:
The purpose of this article is to provoke a debate about the possibilities and limits of judicial intervention in the other branches of the Republic. Judicial activism presupposes, broadly speaking, the failure to carry out public policies that guarantee the fundamental rights of Brazilian citizens by those responsible for it. Currently, the role of the Judiciary in granting fundamental rights constitutionally provided for has caused a reaction from the other powers. This is because, in these times where there is unprecedented ease in the access of information, it is important for political actors to keep the electorate's sympathy up to date. The initiative by the Judiciary in the performance of a function that was not primarily attributed to it by the Federal Constitution and has the capacity to attract protagonism to itself. Through research of doctrinal and jurisprudential positioning, we approach the legitimacy of this intervention from a legal perspective and the consequences of social order that arise from it. In addition, we show how judicial activism has taken on an important role in delivering justice in historic situations of inequality and segregation Finally, we conclude that judicial activism must be contemporized to fulfill the role of fundamental resource to correct omissions on the part of the Public Power capable of affecting the minimum existential to human dignity. The arbitrary or improper use of the Judiciary's ability to interfere in other powers may configure its politicization, affect its duty of exemption, culminating in the imbalance of the rule of law.
Bruce D. Fischer, Loubna Charef
Journal of Leadership, Accountability and Ethics, Volume 18; https://doi.org/10.33423/jlae.v18i4.4606

Abstract:
This paper considers the leadership approaches used in agile project management teams in particular and agile organizations in general. It considers the importance for managers to choose the right leadership style for each specific contingency. A significant consideration is the amount of change and the expectation of innovation. Managers may improve their leadership ability by learning to adjust their leadership styles. Agile approaches are expanding not only because of their ability to respond to change and innovation, but because of the ability to respond quickly to the volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous nature of the business environment that has become the “new normal”. Hybrid project management solutions are emerging and need a contain combination of agile and traditional project leadership approaches.
Bernardo Ramirez, Jr. Daniel J. West, Cherie Lynn Ramirez
Journal of Leadership, Accountability and Ethics, Volume 18; https://doi.org/10.33423/jlae.v18i4.4614

Abstract:
Healthcare systems and health organizations are amongst the most complex and ever-changing human and social enterprises. All countries in the world are involved in various phases of health reforms to expand access, improve quality, and/or control costs. The choice of which structures to use for public and private healthcare initiatives, including Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs), is influenced by economic factors. A high level of professionalization is needed throughout the different levels of these multidisciplinary establishments to ensure effective management. In some healthcare delivery models, increased attention has been given to the significance of quality assurance in higher education and professional leadership development of clinician and healthcare managers’ teams. The International Hospital Federation (IHF) has been involved in efforts to characterize healthcare management competencies and create tools to ensure that healthcare managers and organizations can be more aware of their strengths and aspects needing improvement. We provide an overview of the IHF competencies as well as what training methods and venues are available to help promote professional development of healthcare managers.
Nicole V. Williams, Kerry Robinson, John C. Gillham, Kristie Fetty
Journal of Leadership, Accountability and Ethics, Volume 18; https://doi.org/10.33423/jlae.v18i4.4610

Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to investigate how school boards evaluate superintendents in two different states. The researchers created a questionnaire that consisted of 35 questions in three areas based on the research topics: superintendent evaluation criteria, superintendent evaluation procedures, and school board professional development. Seventy-six school board members participated in the study. Ninety percent of participant school boards are required to evaluate their superintendent. However, only 26 percent of participants reported they utilize the Professional Standards for Educational Leaders (2015) to evaluate the superintendent. The participants also reported a variety of procedures are utilized to evaluate the superintendent. Ninety percent are also not required to receive training to evaluate a superintendent.
Adolfo Garcé
Journal of Leadership, Accountability and Ethics, Volume 18; https://doi.org/10.33423/jlae.v18i4.4609

Abstract:
During the first half of the 1960s, under the auspices of the Alliance for Progress, Uruguay carried out the most ambitious planning effort of its history. The government set up an office to design the plans: the Technical Secretariat of the Commission on Investment and Economic Development (CIDE, in Spanish). In late 1965, the CIDE made available to the government its most important product, the National Economic and Social Development Plan (1965-1974). In early 1966, the government formally approved the plan, but never implemented it. However, both economic and social information and reform proposals generated by CIDE deeply permeated the political debate and the positions of the main social and political actors. This experience confirms the main conclusions of the research and policy “nexus” literature but, at the same time, invites us to devise and put forward new hypotheses.
Sophia Kusyk
Journal of Leadership, Accountability and Ethics, Volume 18; https://doi.org/10.33423/jlae.v18i4.4615

Abstract:
The corporate social responsibility responsibly (CSR) pyramid (Carroll, 1991) plays a substantive role in business and social theory, and research on it is incomplete if it disregards the full gambit of organizational contexts. By focusing on small enterprises (SMEs), this mixed methods study makes a dual contribution to the growing body of research on Carroll's (1991) (CSR) pyramid. First, the research addresses the hierarchy of the CSR pyramid in the previously neglected context of SMEs in Spain. Second, grounded in CSR orientation (CSRO) theory (Schwartz & Carroll, 2003), the study demonstrates how CSR dimensions differ between best practice corporate social performance (CSP) and normal CSP companies. The findings challenge the original hierarchy of the CSR dimensions and suggest that the philanthropic dimension is a differentiator for CSROs. Thus, in contrast to the original CSR pyramid (Carroll, 1991) and in line with the development of CSR orientation theory (Schwartz & Carroll, 2003), a balanced CSRO emphasis for best practice CSP is supported.
Brent H. Kinghorn
Journal of Leadership, Accountability and Ethics, Volume 18; https://doi.org/10.33423/jlae.v18i4.4612

Abstract:
Ethical scandals, particularly in the world of business are not a new phenomenon. However, the increase in scandals in the 21st century provoked collective agents, namely the United States government, to undertake efforts to affect a change in the ethical behavior of all businesses regardless of industry. This research looks at the history of another collective agent’s attempts to force a change in the target’s ethical behavior. The long and involved history of one of the largest ethics programs, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) provides an interesting perspective into the influence tactics of a collective agent to affect ethical behavior of a collective target.
Erika Gray, W. James Weese
Journal of Leadership, Accountability and Ethics, Volume 18; https://doi.org/10.33423/jlae.v18i4.4642

Abstract:
The rungs for advancement up the corporate ladder in the sports industry can be slippery for women. Is the next generation of sports leaders aware of this fact? Senior undergraduate sport management students from Canadian universities completed the Career Pathways Survey (CPS) instrument to measure their perceptions of the glass ceiling. Both groups aspire to senior leadership roles. However, only the students who identified as women perceived the presence of a glass ceiling. Sport management students need to be better educated on the presence of the glass ceiling so the benefits of equitable, inclusive, and diverse leadership groups can be realized.
Stan Mierzwa, Lauren Spath-Caviglia, Iassen Christov
Journal of Leadership, Accountability and Ethics, Volume 18; https://doi.org/10.33423/jlae.v18i4.4608

Abstract:
Recently while near my hometown baseball field, I was reminded of the Little League Pledge. Players traditionally recited the pledge prior to the start of a baseball or softball game; two lines particularly stood out to me, they were “I will play fair and strive to win. But, win or lose, I will always do my best.” The first line mentioned got us thinking about the pandemic and rise in cybercrime. Why are there persons willing to partake in cybercrime, taking advantage of the situation the pandemic has created, and not playing fair? Can cybersecurity researchers utilize similar efforts or strategies used by the global public health to combat cybercrimes, during difficult causal situations? This paper will outline a subset of current research taking place concerning cybercrime and COVID-19 through a rapid literature review, bring to light strategies and technologies that can be used to complement the research, and bring a call to action for researchers and practitioners to give this topic greater attention, awareness, and more knowledge and focus.
Erin S. Barry, John E. McManigle
Journal of Leadership, Accountability and Ethics, Volume 18; https://doi.org/10.33423/jlae.v18i4.4605

Abstract:
Self-awareness is essential to leader development. Internal self-awareness refers to how well we see and understand ourselves and our impact on others. External self-awareness refers to the extent to which we understand how others see us. To optimize self-awareness, it is important to receive and provide frank and meaningful feedback. These skills can improve leader performance, increase self-awareness, and enhance development. Currently, there are few instruments that provide information about self-awareness. The creation of a self-assessment and peer feedback tool would help provide individuals with clear assessments of their leadership knowledge and skills as well as perspectives from peers with whom they work closely. This article describes the development of a self-assessment and peer feedback tool based on a LeaderFollower Framework. This tool can be used within leader development programs to enhance selfawareness and peer perceptions to further develop leaders.
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