Journal of Skin and Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Journal Information
EISSN : 2582-3175
Published by: Scientific Scholar (10.25259)
Total articles ≅ 179
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Latest articles in this journal

Vinitha Panicker, , Radhika Krishna, Nandhetha Sreenivaasan, Jacob Thomas, Velayudhan Sreedevan, Gopikrishnan Anjaneyan, Soumya Jagadeesan, Sajini Lekshmi
Journal of Skin and Sexually Transmitted Diseases pp 1-2; https://doi.org/10.25259/jsstd_22_2022

Abstract:
Gram staining is a differential staining technique performed when a bacterial infection is suspected. The technique classifies bacteria into two broad groups: Gram negative and gram positive bacteria. In this net educational video, we have demonstrated the method of Gram staining.
Journal of Skin and Sexually Transmitted Diseases pp 1-7; https://doi.org/10.25259/jsstd_7_2022

Abstract:
Basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer in white skinned individuals with a rising incidence observed worldwide. The underlying etiopathogenesis is complex and involves an interplay between ultraviolet radiation, phenotype, and genotype. This review discusses the incidence and the phenotypical and environmental risk factors associated with basal cell carcinoma.
, Eman Deif, Asha Rajeev
Journal of Skin and Sexually Transmitted Diseases pp 1-7; https://doi.org/10.25259/jsstd_59_2021

Abstract:
Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cutaneous cancer worldwide, but accounts for only 2–4% of skin cancers in Asian population. Tumor characteristics such as size, location, pathology, and risk of recurrence, as well as treatment tolerability, cost, and patient preference influence the selection of treatment. The goal of treatment is complete tumor removal in superficial/locally invasive BCCs and prolongation of survival in the rare setting of metastatic BCC. Various treatment options available include conventional surgical excision, Mohs micrographic surgery, cryosurgery, electrodesiccation and curettage, topical application of imiquimod or 5-fluorouracil, and photodynamic, and radiotherapy. Surgical excision and Mohs surgery are preferred because of low recurrence rate and the possibility to evaluate the clearance through histology. In the treatment of metastatic or locally advanced lesions, hedgehog pathway inhibitors and the recently approved drug cemiplimab can be beneficial. Sun protection and regular skin self-checks are recommended for all patients with BCC. This literature review gives an overview of the treatment of BCC.
, Lasida Ali
Journal of Skin and Sexually Transmitted Diseases pp 1-6; https://doi.org/10.25259/jsstd_8_2022

Abstract:
The caspase recruitment domain (CARD) is a protein interaction module that comes under the death domain superfamily. CARD mediates important cellular signaling events. Abnormalities in these cellular signaling events play a role in the pathogenesis of malignancies and immune disorders. The significance of CARD in dermatological diseases is less discussed. Mutations affecting CARD-containing proteins are reported to play a pathogenic role in certain patients with dermatoses such as psoriasis, pityriasis rubra pilaris, atopic dermatitis, and fungal infections. These underlying mutations are suggested to have therapeutic implications in various dermatoses, though more information is needed regarding this. This review discusses the association between dermatoses and mutations involving CARD-containing proteins.
, Kunjumani Sobhanakumari, Meriya Zacharia, Seena Palakkal, Kiran Shaj
Journal of Skin and Sexually Transmitted Diseases pp 1-4; https://doi.org/10.25259/jsstd_11_2022

Abstract:
Becker’s nevus, an epidermal nevus, may occur alone or may be associated with musculoskeletal anomalies. There are reports of certain inflammatory and neoplastic diseases showing a predilection for Becker’s nevus. We report a patient who manifested lesions of lichen planus. Interestingly, the lesions showed a predilection for a cutaneous area that harbored a Becker’s nevus. We reviewed similar cases where a Becker’s nevus was reported as a site of predilection for other dermatoses and suggest that the possibility of the former acting as an immunocompromised district of Ruocco (an area that shows less resistance to a disease process in comparison to other body areas) may be considered.
, Meriya Zacharia, Payippat Leelamma Jayalakshmy, Kunjumani Sobhanakumari
Journal of Skin and Sexually Transmitted Diseases pp 1-4; https://doi.org/10.25259/jsstd_1_2022

Abstract:
Alagille syndrome (ALGS) is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder characterized by typical facial features, cholestatic jaundice, and renal, cardiac, eye, and vertebral anomalies. Cholestasis can lead to multiple xanthomas in childhood. We report this case to emphasize the cutaneous features and the lipid abnormalities associated with ALGS. We highlight the importance of a detailed evaluation in patients with multiple xanthomas, especially children, as it may reveal an underlying serious systemic involvement.
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