Canadian Jewish Studies / Études juives canadiennes

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 1198-3493 / 1916-0925
Current Publisher: York University Libraries (10.25071)
Total articles ≅ 38
Current Coverage
DOAJ
Archived in
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Latest articles in this journal

Janice Rosen
Canadian Jewish Studies / Études juives canadiennes, Volume 29, pp 140-141; doi:10.25071/1916-0925.40172

Abstract:
The Association for Canadian Jewish Studies encourages research on the Canadian Jewish experience through the disciplines of political science, sociology, economics, geography, history, demography, education, religion, linguistics, literature, architecture, performing and fine arts, among others.
Jennifer Shaw
Canadian Jewish Studies / Études juives canadiennes, Volume 28; doi:10.25071/1916-0925.40145

Abstract:
The Jewish community’s involvement in the Canadian war effort during the Second World War has been a topic of scholarly interest for decades. However, this scholarship has largely focused on the activities of men, whether as soldiers or members of volunteer organizations, most notably the Canadian Jewish Congress (CJC). When women’s contributions are noted, it has generally been a mention of undefined volunteer work or their activities as soldiers’ wives and mothers, thus ignoring the monumental efforts of Jewish women. In particular, the Women’s War Efforts Committee (WWEC) of the CJC contributed thousands of hours of unpaid labour, fundraising, running a Next-of-Kin League for the wives, mothers, and children of enlisted men, and working with other women’s organizations for the war effort. However, it was their work on massive projects such as the furnishing of recreation spaces on armed forces bases and the opening of Servicemen’s Centres across Canada that would be most impactful. This paper will explore how the activities of the WWEC increased the visibility of the Jewish community in Canada and contributed to changing the public perception of Jews from that of an unwanted immigrant community to that of an accepted minority group. It will also examine the tensions between the men and women of the CJC and the shifting public roles of women within the Jewish community.
Janice Rosen
Canadian Jewish Studies / Études juives canadiennes, Volume 28; doi:10.25071/1916-0925.40148

Abstract:
The Association for Canadian Jewish Studies encourages research on the Canadian Jewish experience through the disciplines of political science, sociology, economics, geography, history, demography, education, religion, linguistics, literature, architecture, performing and fine arts, among others.
Jeanne Abrams
Canadian Jewish Studies / Études juives canadiennes, Volume 28; doi:10.25071/1916-0925.40155

Abstract:
The Association for Canadian Jewish Studies encourages research on the Canadian Jewish experience through the disciplines of political science, sociology, economics, geography, history, demography, education, religion, linguistics, literature, architecture, performing and fine arts, among others.
Magdalene Klassen
Canadian Jewish Studies / Études juives canadiennes, Volume 28; doi:10.25071/1916-0925.40143

Abstract:
The Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire (IODE) was a non-sectarian women’s patriotic association that sought to bolster Canada’s British character. During the interwar period, members dedicated themselves to the “canadianization” of non-British immigrants. Though the Order was overwhelmingly Anglo-Protestant, many established Jewish women joined, embodying a “strategic” approach to humanitarianism. This paper concentrates on the participation of two sisters who joined non-denominational chapters, Irene Wolff and Rosetta Joseph, as well as Montreal’s Jewish “Grace Aguilar” chapter. By joining the Order, these elite Jewish women sought to establish a relation of imperial kinship that could influence dominant Anglo-Canadian perceptions of and policy towards the nation’s Jewish citizens. The efforts of these women suggest the limits and possibilities of a preservationist respectability politics: by the interwar period, the IODE’s vision of British supremacy was increasingly obsolete and demographic changes had irrevocably transformed the character of Canadian Jewish life.
Janice Rosen
Canadian Jewish Studies / Études juives canadiennes, Volume 28; doi:10.25071/1916-0925.40149

Abstract:
The Association for Canadian Jewish Studies encourages research on the Canadian Jewish experience through the disciplines of political science, sociology, economics, geography, history, demography, education, religion, linguistics, literature, architecture, performing and fine arts, among others.
Vassili Schedrin
Canadian Jewish Studies / Études juives canadiennes, Volume 28; doi:10.25071/1916-0925.40147

Abstract:
The Association for Canadian Jewish Studies encourages research on the Canadian Jewish experience through the disciplines of political science, sociology, economics, geography, history, demography, education, religion, linguistics, literature, architecture, performing and fine arts, among others.
Olivier Berube-Sasseville
Canadian Jewish Studies / Études juives canadiennes, Volume 28; doi:10.25071/1916-0925.40158

Abstract:
The Association for Canadian Jewish Studies encourages research on the Canadian Jewish experience through the disciplines of political science, sociology, economics, geography, history, demography, education, religion, linguistics, literature, architecture, performing and fine arts, among others.
Ashley Mayer-Thibault
Canadian Jewish Studies / Études juives canadiennes, Volume 28; doi:10.25071/1916-0925.40153

Abstract:
The Association for Canadian Jewish Studies encourages research on the Canadian Jewish experience through the disciplines of political science, sociology, economics, geography, history, demography, education, religion, linguistics, literature, architecture, performing and fine arts, among others.
Cjs Editors
Canadian Jewish Studies / Études juives canadiennes, Volume 28; doi:10.25071/1916-0925.40139

Abstract:
The Association for Canadian Jewish Studies encourages research on the Canadian Jewish experience through the disciplines of political science, sociology, economics, geography, history, demography, education, religion, linguistics, literature, architecture, performing and fine arts, among others.
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