International Journal of Geoheritage and Parks

Journal Information
ISSN : 2577-4441
Published by: Elsevier BV (10.1016)
Total articles ≅ 89
Current Coverage
DOAJ
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Laeticia García-Sánchez, , Miguel Á. Cruz-Pérez, Lucero Morelos-Rodríguez, Erika Salgado-Martínez, Pedro Corona-Chávez
International Journal of Geoheritage and Parks; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijgeop.2021.10.001

Abstract:
To reach the ambitious goals and targets of the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development it is compulsory to pay special attention to those strategies that arise from local communities. In this contribution we present a comparative study on local initiatives pursuing development through the sustainable use of the geoheritage, of two territories of central Mexico: (a) Tlalpujahua-El Oro former mining district (Michoacán and State of Mexico), and (b) Comarca Minera UNESCO Global Geopark (Hidalgo state). Both study cases are representative of the mountainous, cultural landscapes of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, and both are also former mining districts with an outstanding geodiversity and a valuable mining heritage.
Jiaqi Li, , Zhongjun Wang, William Wang, Huijie Chen, Mei He
International Journal of Geoheritage and Parks, Volume 9, pp 363-373; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijgeop.2021.09.001

Abstract:
Demand for parks and green space for physical and mental relaxation has increased dramatically during and after the COVID−19 Pandemic in many countries. In order to understand nature and forest experience with human health, we conducted multi-disciplinary research to examine if different auditory stimuli will cause the change of healthy people's physiological and psychological effects, especially under typical forest therapy activity---focused-attention meditation (FAM). In this study, we recorded the data of heart rate, blood pressure as well as brainwave activities as physiological indices. We used a modified Semantic Differential Method (SD) to investigate participants' subjective feelings on different sound stimuli. A significant increase in heart rate was found during meditation under a street sound auditory background. The theta band power reduced significantly compared to that under other sound stimulation. The highest feeling scores on the level of comfort, relaxation, and nature showed with the presence of a natural sound environment. In conclusion, the natural sound background of the forest can make people more relax physically and psychologically during meditation.
Thi Phuong Chi Hoang, Quang Hai Ha, Thi Que Nam Nguyen
International Journal of Geoheritage and Parks; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijgeop.2021.09.002

Abstract:
Nui Chua National Park, Ninh Thuan province, is a semi-arid climate while locating right next to a tropical forest climate, therefore, it has a rich biodiversity ecosystem, where the coastal dry forest ecosystem is rarely seen in Vietnam. This area contains many valuable geomorphologic features in denuded – lithological – tectonic terrain, among them, three features can be considered as national treasures: 1) Nui Chua dome – block mountains; 2) Rai Cave tectonic – abrasive coastline and 3) Lang Choi Stone Park. Nui Chua dome – block mountains is the unique geomorphosite of Vietnam which has the right conditions for the dry ecosystem to develop. The tectonic – abrasive coastline of Rai Cave and Lang Choi Rock Park is home to unique and precious geoheritages such as two-stage development of boulders or balanced rocks, karren sculpturing, caves, notches on ancient coral reefs terrace or spheroidal weathering, tafoni on intrusive rocks, to name a few. To archive the goal of sustainable development, it is important to link the conservation activities of the biodiversity at Nui Chua National Park to the preservation efforts of geodiversity (geology, geomorphology, etc.) in the area. Providing scientific explanations at each geomorphosites together with safe sightseeing guides will help increase the quality of tourism, attract more visitors to explore and learn about this mysterious, wonderful, and diverse ecosystem.
International Journal of Geoheritage and Parks; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijgeop.2021.08.001

Abstract:
Ecotourism is considered as a tool for sustainability and it is a sustainable approach to balance economic, social, cultural and environmental aspects for development. The application of ecotourism concept at ground level needs to develop strategies based on local natural and cultural resources and sustainability principles. Thus, the strategies were formulated in this study based on the principle of ecotourism and sustainability. The present study explores the application of strength-weakness-opportunity-threat (SWOT) based analysis for ecotourism planning strategies formulation in Kullu district, Himachal Pradesh, India. The internal factors (strength and weakness) and external factors (opportunity and threat) were diagnosed systematically and comprehensively to prepare TOWS matrix and it contains four group strategies (Strength-Opportunity (SO), Weakness-Opportunity (WO), Strength-Threat (ST) and Weakness-Threat (WT) and 30 sub-strategies. Out of total developed strategies, Seven SO, eight WO, eight ST and seven WT strategies has been adopted for ecotourism development in the study area. The adopted strategies further analyzed using analytical hierarchy process (AHP) and Fuzzy AHP to identify the hierarchical best priority strategies for ecotourism development. SWOT-AHP and SWOT-Fuzzy AHP methods were ensemble together to obtain the best priority strategies. Hence, the implementation of these strategies in the study area should helps to achieve regional sustainable development goal.
Kalifi Ferretti-Gallon, Emma Griggs, Anil Shrestha,
International Journal of Geoheritage and Parks; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijgeop.2021.05.004

Abstract:
While the importance of ecological conservation and encouraging public recreation in national parks is widely recognized, challenges to achieving these goals persist. With over a century of national park management experience, the institutional knowledge of national park systems in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United States can offer a valuable insight into management best practices. Twelve open-ended semistructured interviews with national park experts representing the four systems revealed valuable lessons learned in major facets of national park management. Overall, our results suggest that effective and sustainable national park management requires federally-based organizational framework with deference to local institutions at park-level, stakeholder inclusion in park management decision-making, public engagement encouraged by information-sharing and education, clarity on boundaries to improve relations with adjacent land owners, and prioritizing improved indigenous relations. Interviews highlighted that better park governance is rooted in education to raise awareness of the importance of national parks and park systems to the public. Tourism and climate change were widely anticipated to increasingly pose challenges to park management, underscoring a shared urgency to address these issues.
, Narayan Chandra Jana
International Journal of Geoheritage and Parks; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijgeop.2021.05.002

Abstract:
The Rarh Bengal of India has huge potential for development of geotourism due to its diverse landscape consisting of hills, dome shaped inselberges, tors, dams, badlands, springs, waterfall, ravines etc. The combination of vast dense forest and diverse flora and fauna with various geomorphic features has created a prosperous and complex geodiversity in the Rarh region. However, the potential of geotourism in the region has not yet fully developed. The main objective of this study is to emphasize the potential for geotourism in the Rarh region of West Bengal and to determine the existing status and geotourism prospective of geosites in this region. In this paper, the authors have proposed an inventory of geosites in the Rarh region and analyzed the vast potential of geotourism among them. A comparative analysis of the selected sites has been carried out by applying the Modified Geosite Assessment Model (M-GAM), which has exposed the most suitable geosites for the development of future geotourism. The M-GAM provided the significant assessment of both Main Values and Additional Values of the sites according to the status of each sub-indicator in the valuation model assumed by tourists. The results of this study reveal information about the major aspects of the development of each geosites and identify which sites need more attention and better management in future, so that the region becomes much attractive to larger number of tourists and becomes a well-known geotourism destination.
, Roger Crofts, Murray Gray, Dan Tormey
International Journal of Geoheritage and Parks, Volume 9, pp 323-334; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijgeop.2021.05.003

Abstract:
Geoconservation is an integral part of nature conservation. It protects our diverse and valued geoheritage, contributes to the sustainable management of ecosystems, provides a range of economic, cultural and social benefits, and connects people, landscapes and their cultures. Geoconservation has a vital part to play in managing the natural environment and helping society to address global challenges, such as biodiversity loss, adaptations to climate change and sea-level rise, and sustainable development. The IUCN Guidelines for Geoconservation in Protected and Conserved Areas, published in 2020, outline the key principles of geoconservation and demonstrate their application across the full range of IUCN protected area management categories and other conserved areas. Protected and conserved areas, including geoparks, have a vital educational role in promoting better understanding and awareness of geoconservation and the values and benefits of geodiversity and geoheritage for nature and society. Integrating geoconservation into the management of all categories of protected and conserved areas would benefit not only the conservation of geoheritage, but also all of nature and contribute to a sustainable future.
, Melinda Therese McHenry
International Journal of Geoheritage and Parks, Volume 9, pp 294-312; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijgeop.2021.05.001

Abstract:
Geoconservation is, at its foundation, a grass-roots movement with geoheritage represented by geosites containing the most scientifically significant and valuable geodiversity elements. Problems arise in the assessment and communication of inventory due in part to inconsistent and traditionally time-consuming, ‘snapshot’ assessments that are difficult to spatially monitor.
, Anjan Sen, Lalit Mohan Verma, Ravi Mishra, Vinod Kumar
International Journal of Geoheritage and Parks, Volume 9, pp 157-171; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijgeop.2021.04.001

Abstract:
Geodiversity has tremendous geological and physical elements on the planet earth such as minerals, rocks, soils, fossils, and landforms, as well as active geological and geomorphological processes. Geodiversity constitutes the natural diversity for the richness of geoheritage sites and it attracts geotourism. The prime objective of this research is to identify the potentials and limitations for geo-diversity in the Jhamarkotra area, Udaipur. It's based on qualitative and quantitative information, which were collected through numerous sources such as USGS (Sentinel-2A) satellite data, Bhuvan, and in-depth literature review. All Data has been analyzed through ArcGIS, Erdas software, and bibliographical-speculative method. The Matrix of NDVI, LULC, DEM, BSI. Geology has been calculated for suitability and vulnerability for geoheritage and geotourism site of the Jhamarkotra Area. As well as SWOT analysis (strengths, weakness, opportunity and threat) and TOWS matrix (threat, opportunity, weakness and strengths) were used for systematic analysis of these outcomes for develop geotourism. Results showed that the Jhamarkotra area has maximum potentials with suitable physical and cultural features. On the other hand, it has some minuscule problems such as deprived communities and lack of knowledge to develop geoheritage sites for geotourism activities. Eventually, the Jhamarkotra Area needs an inclusive and holistic approach with sustainable mining, processing, eco-friendly geotourism activities, and integration of all stakeholders to cultivate for geoheritage and geopark ecosystem, which will be supportive of grass route to worldwide geoheritage services.
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