Journal of Social, Behavioral, and Health Sciences

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 1948-3260 / 1948-3260
Current Publisher: Walden University (10.5590)
Total articles ≅ 24
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Latest articles in this journal

Kimberlee B Kimberlee B. Bonura, Walden University, Dawn M Dawn M. Fountain, University of West Florida
Journal of Social, Behavioral, and Health Sciences, Volume 14; doi:10.5590/jsbhs.2020.14.1.13

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Naheed Naheed Ahmed, University of Maryland, College Park, C. Andrew C. Andrew Conway, University of Maryland, College Park
Journal of Social, Behavioral, and Health Sciences, Volume 14; doi:10.5590/jsbhs.2020.14.1.11

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Blakely Blakely Murphy, Adelphi University, Katherine Katherine Fiori, Adelphi University, James James Stein, Dixie State University
Journal of Social, Behavioral, and Health Sciences, Volume 14; doi:10.5590/jsbhs.2020.14.1.10

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Rebecca G. Rebecca G. Cowan, Walden University, Craig Craig Blum, Walden University, Gary Gary Szirony, Walden University, Richard J Richard J. Cicchetti, Walden University
Journal of Social, Behavioral, and Health Sciences, Volume 14; doi:10.5590/jsbhs.2020.14.1.12

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Peggy Peggy Henninger, Walden University, Donna M. L. Donna M. L. Heretick, Walden University
Journal of Social, Behavioral, and Health Sciences, Volume 14; doi:10.5590/jsbhs.2020.14.1.09

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Edith N. Edith N. Ahajumobi, Walden University, Peter B. Peter B. Anderson, Walden University
Journal of Social, Behavioral, and Health Sciences, Volume 14; doi:10.5590/jsbhs.2020.14.1.08

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Donna M. L. Donna M. L. Heretick, Walden University, Inna Inna Learn, Walden University
Journal of Social, Behavioral, and Health Sciences, Volume 14; doi:10.5590/jsbhs.2020.14.1.07

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Helle Helle Rønn-Smidt, University of Aalborg and Hammel Neurorehabilitation and Research Centre, Aarhus University, Janet K Janet K. Shim, University of California, San Francisco, Amber Amber Fitzsimmons, University of California, San Francisco, Kristian Kristian Larsen, et al.
Journal of Social, Behavioral, and Health Sciences, Volume 14; doi:10.5590/jsbhs.2020.14.1.06

Abstract:
The quality of the collaboration between health professionals and caregivers is of great significance to outcome and recovery. Severe brain injuries after a stroke can leave patients unable to communicate their needs and wishes with health professionals, in which case the role of the caregiver(s) becomes even more important. This position is highly differentiated, and there are substantial variations in how caregivers participate in the collaboration. Using the Bourdieusian concept of cultural health capital, we aimed to develop a broader understanding of the role played by the patient’s caregiver and how inequality is produced in the encounter with professionals. This qualitative study was conducted from 2014 to 2018. We observed the meetings and interactions between caregivers and health professionals during patients’ neurorehabilitation after a stroke, and we interviewed caregivers and health professionals on their experiences during this period. Constructing three different caregiver types—the proactive, the persistent, and the deferential—we discovered different ways of interacting and different attitudes related to cultural health capital, which provided the caregiver with more or fewer opportunities to participate in a dialogue and negotiation on behalf of the patient.
Amanda Michiko Amanda Michiko Shigihara, California State University Sacramento, Sacramento, California, United States
Journal of Social, Behavioral, and Health Sciences, Volume 14; doi:10.5590/jsbhs.2020.14.1.04

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Diane Diane Kratt, Florida Gulf Coast University, Fort Myers, Florida, United States, Michael Michael Houdyshell, Florida Gulf Coast University, Fort Myers, Florida, United States
Journal of Social, Behavioral, and Health Sciences, Volume 14; doi:10.5590/jsbhs.2020.14.1.05

Abstract:
Reports of college students living with mental health conditions are common, and the understanding of their connection to academic success is increasing. University campuses strive to meet the psychological needs of their students with a variety of institutionalized practices. However, a question can be raised about how much individual faculty members and colleges know about their specific students’ mental health needs and whether there are ways to assist those students at that level. This is a case study on a group of 17 student teachers in the College of Education at a university in the Southern United States who self-reported that they were living with symptoms of a mental health condition. Through individual interviews, the researchers asked student teachers to describe their symptoms and explain their perceptions of how they alleviate the symptoms to manage their life as a college student. Results of the study were reported thematically and categorized as (a) an increase in negative thoughts and behaviors, (b) absence of positive traits and abilities, and (c) self-identified coping strategies and external support. Discussion and recommendations regarding the findings are included.
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