Journal of Business Diversity

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 2158-3889 / 2158-3889
Published by: North American Business Press (10.33423)
Total articles ≅ 145
Archived in
SHERPA/ROMEO
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Latest articles in this journal

Monica C. Gavino, Jason Lambert, Ekundayo Akinlade
Journal of Business Diversity, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/jbd.v21i3.4432

Abstract:
The aim of this study is to examine how faculty perceptions of the diversity climate affect faculty extra role behaviors and subsequently students’ satisfaction with their academic performance. The results indicate that the diversity climate of respect among faculty is positively related to their extra effort and going above and beyond for students. As well, that the effects of both student perceptions of the diversity climate of respect and student perceptions of faculty extra role behaviors on their satisfaction with academic performance are not only significant but connected. We also investigate the moderating effect of student race on that relationship. This study finds that student race and ethnicity play a role on how the diversity climate of respect affects their satisfaction with their academic performance.
Abiola Adebanjo
Journal of Business Diversity, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/jbd.v21i3.4431

Abstract:
Think of Jumia or Amazon in retail, Uber or Bolt in ride sharing, Coursera or Udemy in your quest for knowledge and you will understand what digital services entails. Digital has to do with our gadgets, while economy refers to money or trade. These two otherwise disconnected terms are now yoked by a click necessitating new taxing rules across borders. We use search engines, online advertising channels, e-commerce sites and subscription platforms daily. While some of these services are provided by Non-Resident Companies (NRC’s) that are not taxed, their resident competitors are easy targets for tax purposes. With the digitisation of business solutions and cyberisation of the workplace, the Finance Act 2019 has finally replaced the concept of Permanent (PE) Establishment with Significant Economic Presence (SEP) in line with global trend. It appears a digital economy will in a matter of time replace the traditional economy and if not rightly taxed will result in consequential losses for some countries. Nigeria should be ready for the next phase of taxation.
Isis Gouédard, Emmanuel Fragnière
Journal of Business Diversity, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/jbd.v21i3.4435

Abstract:
Given its growing influence on the image and reputation of organizations, the customer experience is now one of management’s main responsibilities. The private sector has been aware of this for many years. Public administrations must also take an interest in it. This is particularly the case for the Geneva social institution we studied, which, with its public and social role and its duty to guarantee total equality of treatment to its various users, seeks to offer them a customer experience that is as personalized, meaningful, and as complete as possible. The primary objective of this research is to define the main elements of perceived value of the welfare office “queuing experience” such as equality and dignity. The focus here is on homelessness.
Genevieve Smith, Kellie McElhaney, Diana Chavez-Varela
Journal of Business Diversity, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/jbd.v21i3.4430

Abstract:
Case studies – using real-life business situations or imagined business scenarios – are a key pedagogical tool for instruction within management education programs that inform students about business processes, decision making, strategy, and leadership and management challenges. However, published case studies used in business schools globally primarily include White male protagonists and do not incorporate key topics related to diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI). This study analyzes trends in the identity/ies of protagonists in case studies, as well as in topics related to DEI. Limitations and implications for case study authors and faculty, business schools and case study publications are also discussed.
Matthew W. Lauritsen
Journal of Business Diversity, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/jbd.v21i3.4434

Abstract:
Researchers who design studies based on Schein’s (1973, 1975) think manager-think male (TMTM) research paradigm ubiquitously conclude that the greater incongruence between beliefs about managers and women, compared to managers and men, is problematic for women in leadership roles. However, this hypothesis is never directly tested. Using polynomial regression analysis, the congruence hypothesis was tested via the evaluations of the respondents’ current supervisors as criteria. The hypothesized congruence effect was not found. In other words, there was no observed relationship between the congruence of people’s beliefs about men, women, and leaders, and their subsequent evaluations of women leaders. The results of this study raise concerns about the validity of the conclusions of TMTM studies.
Marcelo E. Siles, Rubén O. Martinez
Journal of Business Diversity, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/jbd.v21i3.4428

Abstract:
This study focusses on the high growth of Latino-owned businesses (LOBs) in the United States during the last two decades and the constraints these businesses face during their start-up and development stages. During this period, the number of LOBs increased faster than businesses owned by other racial and ethnic groups. The study also addresses the following aspects of Latino business ownership: 1) the main reasons U.S. Latinos decide to become business owners; 2) their reluctance to seek loans from formal financial markets; 3) internal and external factors that limit Latino business owner participation in financial markets, 4) and the internal and external factors that banks and other financial institutions face when working with Latino businesspeople. We found important gaps in access to credit between LOBs and two comparison groups: i) Equally-Latino & non-Latino firms and ii) White-owned businesses.
William Lee McClain, Stacey Rene' Vande Linde
Journal of Business Diversity, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/jbd.v21i3.4433

Abstract:
Despite federal laws prohibiting discrimination related to diversity and inclusion (D&I) in the workplace, organizations continue to struggle with enforcing this mandate. This article examines how leaders who are innovative and bold in their attention to D&I will see leadership more clearly through the lens of D&I. The authors examine four innovative D&I steps: establish D&I position as a new member of the C-suite, link C-suite salary and bonus with D&I objectives, open a wider aperture with D&I instruction in K-12, and create your own D&I game-changing narrative. The authors conclude with probing questions that call for leaders to be innovative when addressing D&I.
Maureen Snow Andrade, Angela Schill, Jonathan H. Westover, Cambree King
Journal of Business Diversity, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/jbd.v21i3.4427

Abstract:
Comparative gender job satisfaction studies have been inconclusive with some finding that women are more satisfied on the job than men and others finding no difference. Previous research has also identified similarities and differences in gender and job satisfaction globally based on cultural, economic, social, and political factors across countries and world regions. Overall, however, limited cross-national or global research has been conducted in this area. The current study uses International Social Survey Programme data to investigate the role of gender and country on job satisfaction. Findings support previous beliefs about gender differences but with significant country variations.
Halil Asllani, John R. Fisher
Journal of Business Diversity, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/jbd.v21i3.4429

Abstract:
Recent protests and riots around the globe have renewed the call for police reform. While police reforms could benefit the police and the public, police training in cultural awareness, racial biases, and communications may result in better and faster changes in police attitudes and approaches for working with minorities. This study suggests that non-police public safety personnel perceive a greater need for police training than the police. The study examined the police relationship and their communication with minority populations as perceived by Kosovo police (N=20) and other public safety personnel (N=24). Respondents answered a quantitative survey. Although not statistically significant, it appears that most police respondents didn’t recognize that cultural barriers exist between minorities and police, and they didn’t feel a strong need for cultural training. On the other hand, other public safety personnel showed greater support for cultural training, recognizing that cultural barriers do exist between police and minorities. Both groups agreed that trust is more important than speaking the same language when working with minorities.
Sumeet Jhamb, Teresa Ryan
Journal of Business Diversity, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/jbd.v21i3.4436

Abstract:
This study discusses gender-emotion stereotyping and its effects on small businesses and entrepreneurial ventures and their overall strategic management. Men and women are expected to express different types of emotion in different ways according to their gender (Brescoll & Uhlmann, 2008; Brescoll, 2016; Durik et al., 2006; Fabes & Martin, 1991). Stereotypes are applied by individuals to others and themselves to govern and judge behavior (Plant et al., 2000). Those who act outside of societal expectations are subject to backlash by their peers, such as less respect and poor performance evaluations, with consequences on day-to-day business operations (Winkel & Ragins, 2017). The present study examines gender-emotion stereotyping’s effects on individuals and their personalities in the workplace, specifically within small businesses and entrepreneurial ventures. Through the proposed collection and analysis of secondary and primary data as well as discussion of implementing proposed solutions, this paper suggests methods and techniques to reduce gender-emotion stereotyping’s adverse effects on businesses and individuals and their planned and unplanned outcomes.
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