American Journal of Management

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 2165-7998 / 2165-7998
Published by: North American Business Press (10.33423)
Total articles ≅ 168
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Ying Hong, Xuguang Guo
American Journal of Management, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/ajm.v21i4.4583

Abstract:
The relationship between CEO extrinsic reward and firm performance is of great importance from both scholarly and practical perspectives. This study used the COMPUSTAT dataset tracing CEOs and their firm performance over twenty years. The results indicate that both CEO pay and company profit in the previous year had positive effects on company profit in the current year. In addition, there was a moderating effect of previous year’s company profit on the relationship between CEO pay in the previous year and company profit in the current year, in such a way that the effect of CEO pay on future company profit was more positive for less profitable companies. Furthermore, we found a curvilinear relationship between CEO pay and company profit, indicating that excessive CEO compensation was detrimental to company profit. Future research and implications are discussed.
Lucas Engelhardt, Alasdair White
American Journal of Management, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/ajm.v21i4.4554

Abstract:
The COVID-19 crisis caught many economic players unprepared and unable to act. Little research has been conducted on its impacts and reasons for the lack of appropriate countermeasures. This paper investigates the progress of the crisis and analyzes potential reasons for the emergence of unsatisfactory risk management. It gives advice for companies on how to cope with the situation best. In addition to the current situation, two past crises as well as the contrary strategies of two companies were examined with the aim of drawing sensible conclusions towards their strategies of managing risk. Modern methods with a strong focus on data-driven examination lead to one-dimensional approaches that are unable to reflect complex interrelations. The paper concludes that existing risk management systems are already set up in a comprehensive way and that the main issue lies within behavioral patterns of individuals who are either unable or unwilling to see existing risks. This leads to situations in which risks are identified, though concurrently ignored in subsequent decision-making processes.
Jr. N. L. Reinsch, Jeanine W. Turner
American Journal of Management, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/ajm.v21i4.4558

Abstract:
This study explores factors that influence individual decisions to conduct multiple, simultaneous interactions, that is, to multicommunicate. We present data indicating that: (a) the Covid-19 pandemic increased the frequency of multicommunication; (b) university students multicommunicate in order to achieve instrumental, interpersonal, and identity goals; and (c) while some university students recognize that multicommunication increases the risks of communication failures, others do not. We offer some suggestions for educators who wish to include multicommunication concepts in their courses. We also suggest that business practitioners (and their managers) should consider instrumental, interpersonal, and identity objectives when they choose between face-to-face and electronically mediated interaction.
Mark Ray Reavis, David W. Orr
American Journal of Management, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/ajm.v21i4.4553

Abstract:
The American practice of capitalism has been nothing short of dynamic. The struggle to find an acceptable method of ‘the proper administration of wealth’ has been a key issue since at least the days of Andrew Carnegie. In the early years of American industrialization, the focus was largely and legally on stockholder rights. This focus shifted somewhat towards the benefit of labor as unions gained power in the early 20th century. Then, the stakeholder view began to take root and grow in the last half of the 20th century. This view expanded the conversation of capitalists vs. labor to include other stakeholders. This research reviews history and literature on the journey of American capitalism and takes the additional step of addressing expectations of corporate governance changes in the near future and the impact millennials are likely to have on the journey.
Omimah Alsaadi, Emrah Acar
American Journal of Management, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/ajm.v21i4.4557

Abstract:
Successful management of post-disaster reconstruction projects (PDRPs) can ensure the efficient use of resources and lead to improved outcomes. The literature on PDRP management is yet in its embryonic stage and systematic research efforts are necessary to address the topic. Paper compares the challenges faced in conventional projects to those in PDRPs according to project management knowledge areas, through an analytical evaluation of the interdependencies between different areas of expertise. A descriptive-exploratory research was designed and qualitative data from interviews with 11 managers with PDRP experience from different countries were analysed. Cause-and-effect relationships between the factors leading to ‘frequent changes in scope,’ ‘time overruns,’ ‘cost overruns,’ and ‘low quality’ were identified. Outputs suggest that managing stakeholders, risks and communications appears critical to cope with an evolving scope, while procurement management has a significant impact on project outcomes due to resource scarcity.
James M. Wilkerson
American Journal of Management, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/ajm.v21i4.4555

Abstract:
This article presents conceptual research questions and propositions on the relationship between the artisan entrepreneur’s oppositional identity and entrepreneurially venturing in the context of declining cities and urbanized regions. In general, I propose that some features of declining cities typically deemed harmful to business (e.g., deindustrialization, population loss, stifled innovation) may be less problematic for artisan ventures operated with a strong devotion to craft, localness and sense of place, and independence and less emphasis on financial performance than is typical of more mainstream entrepreneurship. The conceptual development herein relies on identity theory (including occupational identity and counter-institutional identity concepts), embeddedness theory, and urban economics concepts. This effort addresses calls for more research on both artisan entrepreneurship and the declining city as a context of entrepreneurship.
Sean Hildebrand, Matthew Malone
American Journal of Management, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/ajm.v21i4.4580

Abstract:
As the COVID-19 pandemic spread across the globe, local (county and municipal) emergency management departments in the United States were thrust to the forefront in addressing the needs of its citizenry. Doing so likely involved the use of Comprehensive Emergency Management (CEM) principles and planning efforts to address the pandemic. This paper outlines how respondents to a May/June 2020 survey of lead local emergency management department professionals nationwide used a variety of tools to address the evolving demands of the pandemic. The results suggest that a majority of local departments report having preparation and response means designed to address a pandemic in place prior to the outbreak of COVID- 19, but the use of specific efforts to confront the virus varied from place to place, as do attitudes regarding the impact of the pandemic on the daily operations of the local emergency management agency.
Jeantyl Norze, Adriana Alfaro, Reuben Twijukye
American Journal of Management, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/ajm.v21i4.4584

Abstract:
The glass ceiling effect is unfortunately still a reality in academia. Only 30% U.S University has female presidents. Given the multiple benefits of gender diversity in senior management, understanding gender gap in top leadership should be a priority. The purpose of this study was to investigate gender roles and leadership effectiveness in higher education. The results show that female leaders were seen less effective than men when committing relationship mistakes. Additionally, both male and female leaders were seen less effective when committing relationship mistakes than task mistakes. These findings signal the need to examine gender bias across other academic settings.
David J. Bechtold, Rajendra Khandekar, Adam Melnick
American Journal of Management, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/ajm.v21i4.4582

Abstract:
Entrepreneurial research often focuses on the psychological traits of the entrepreneur but rarely on the notion that under certain circumstances entrepreneurship may be equally driven by external factors beyond the founder's control. This paper looks at the 40-year history of a serial entrepreneur and identifies five types of business ventures driven by contextual factors and the personal attributes of the entrepreneur. These five types are the “advised” venture, the “safe harbor” venture, the “accidental” venture, the “greener grass” venture, and the “passion” venture. The paper closes with a call for future research to include situational context in defining what creates and motivates entrepreneurs.
Frank R. Veltri, Clay Daughtrey, John J. Miller
American Journal of Management, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/ajm.v21i4.4581

Abstract:
This study investigated the economic impact of visitor’s expenditures at a junior girl’s club sporting event in the city of Denver, Colorado. This study uses a random sample of 2,000 sport fans of which 1,163 surveys were found to be usable (n=1,163). The findings reveal that hosting a club sports national tournament can generate substantial economic benefits and, in some cases, greater than those associated with mega sporting events. Key findings are that economic impact can play a critical role in assessing the potential benefits of hosting small events and that youth sport event managers must make sure to meet the needs of caravan fans. Caravan fans are the parents and family members that attend these events to watch their children participate.
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