Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 0749-503X / 1097-0061
Current Publisher: Wiley (10.1002)
Former Publisher:
Total articles ≅ 5,061
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Latest articles in this journal

Published: 1 June 2021
by Wiley
Yeast, Volume 38, pp 388-388; doi:10.1002/yea.3485

Published: 1 June 2021
by Wiley
Yeast, Volume 38, pp 337-338; doi:10.1002/yea.3486

Published: 1 June 2021
by Wiley
Yeast, Volume 38; doi:10.1002/yea.3654

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Sabnam Parbin, Subha Damodharan,
Published: 28 May 2021
by Wiley
Yeast; doi:10.1002/yea.3653

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Xiaobing Li, Emmanuelle Cordat, Manfred J. Schmitt,
Published: 25 May 2021
by Wiley
Yeast; doi:10.1002/yea.3652

Abstract:
Human kidney anion exchanger 1 (kAE1) facilitates simultaneous efflux of bicarbonate and absorption of chloride at the basolateral membrane of α-intercalated cells. In these cells, kAE1 contributes to systemic acid–base balance along with the proton pump v-H+-ATPase and the cytosolic carbonic anhydrase II. Recent electron microscopy analyses in yeast demonstrate that heterologous expression of several kAE1 variants causes a massive accumulation of the anion transporter in intracellular membrane structures. Here, we examined the origin of these kAE1 aggregations in more detail. Using various biochemical techniques and advanced light and electron microscopy, we showed that accumulation of kAE1 mainly occurs in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes which eventually leads to strong unfolded protein response (UPR) activation and severe growth defect in kAE1 expressing yeast cells. Furthermore, our data indicate that UPR activation is dose dependent and uncoupled from the bicarbonate transport activity. By using truncated kAE1 variants, we identified the C-terminal region of kAE1 as crucial factor for the increased ER stress level. Finally, a redistribution of ER-localized kAE1 to the cell periphery was achieved by boosting the ER folding capacity. Our findings not only demonstrate a promising strategy for preventing intracellular kAE1 accumulation and improving kAE1 plasma membrane targeting but also highlight the versatility of yeast as model to investigate kAE1-related research questions including the analysis of structural features, protein degradation and trafficking. Furthermore, our approach might be a promising strategy for future analyses to further optimize the cell surface targeting of other disease-related PM proteins, not only in yeast but also in mammalian cells.
, Maurizio Bettiga
Published: 17 May 2021
by Wiley
Yeast; doi:10.1002/yea.3651

Abstract:
Acetic acid stress represents a frequent challenge to counteract for yeast cells under several environmental conditions and industrial bioprocesses. The molecular mechanisms underlying its response have been mostly elucidated in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where acetic acid can be either a physiological substrate or a stressor. This review will focus on acetic acid stress and its response in the context of cellular transport, pH homeostasis, metabolism and stress-signalling pathways. This information has been integrated with the results obtained by multi-omics, synthetic biology and metabolic engineering approaches aimed to identify major cellular players involved in acetic acid tolerance. In the production of biofuels and renewable chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass, the improvement of acetic acid tolerance is a key factor. In this view, how this knowledge could be used to contribute to the development and competitiveness of yeast cell factories for sustainable applications will be also discussed.
Published: 12 May 2021
by Wiley
Yeast, Volume 38, pp 339-351; doi:10.1002/yea.3650

Abstract:
Much like other living organisms, yeast cells have a limited lifespan, both in terms of the maximal length of time a cell can stay alive (chronological lifespan) as well as the maximal number of cell divisions it can undergo (replicative lifespan). Over the past years, intensive research revealed that the lifespan of yeast depends both on the genetic background of the cells as well as on environmental factors. Specifically, the presence of stress factors, reactive oxygen species and the availability of nutrients profoundly impact lifespan, and signaling cascades involved in the response to these factors, including the TOR and cAMP/PKA pathways, play a central role. Interestingly, yeast lifespan also has direct implications for its use in industrial processes. In beer brewing, for example, the inoculation of finished beer with live yeast cells, a process called “bottle conditioning” helps improve the product’s shelf life by clearing undesirable carbonyl compounds such as furfural and 2‐methylpropanal that cause staling. However, this effect depends on the reductive metabolism of living cells and is thus inherently limited by the cells’ chronological lifespan. Here, we review the mechanisms underlying chronological lifespan in yeast. We also discuss how this insight connects to industrial observations and ultimately opens new routes towards superior industrial yeasts that can help improve a product’s shelf life, and thus contribute to a more sustainable industry.
Angelo Wong, Ernest Moses Lam, Cheryl Pai, Annika Gunderson, Tamar E. Carter,
Published: 6 May 2021
by Wiley
Yeast; doi:10.1002/yea.3565

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 2 May 2021
by Wiley
Yeast, Volume 38, pp 293-294; doi:10.1002/yea.3484

Published: 2 May 2021
by Wiley
Yeast, Volume 38; doi:10.1002/yea.3563

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
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