Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 1381-2386 / 1573-1596
Current Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC (10.1007)
Former Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC (10.1023) , Springer Science and Business Media LLC (10.1007)
Total articles ≅ 1,283
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Attila Buzási, Tamás Pálvölgyi,
Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Volume 26, pp 1-20; doi:10.1007/s11027-021-09943-8

Abstract:
Drought phenomena have been frequent in Hungarian history. One of the most important sectors in Hungary is agriculture, so the agricultural drought is a particularly important area to be examined. The purpose of the study is to determine how vulnerable each county (NUTS-3 regions) is to the expected effects of drought. The study provides an assessment framework of drought-related vulnerabilities and the preparedness of drought policies at the NUTS-3 level in Hungary. The drought-related vulnerability of NUTS-3 regions was determined by selected exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity indicators. The calculation of drought vulnerability is based on the IPCC 2007 methodology, while the input data were derived from the National Adaptation Geo-information System online data platform and Hungarian agro-statistical data sources. An assessment framework of drought-related policy performance of NUTS-3-level climate change strategies was developed. The evaluation methodology is based on a specific scorecard of evaluation criteria related to the performance of the county’s drought-related objectives and measures. According to the relationship between the county’s drought-related vulnerability and policy performance, the counties were classified into four types. The main results show that several counties fail the target by overestimating the role of drought prevention, with little vulnerability index. In contrast, many counties are not adequately prepared for the impacts of drought, despite their high vulnerability index.
Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Volume 26, pp 1-18; doi:10.1007/s11027-021-09949-2

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Jing-Li Fan, Qian Wang,
Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Volume 26, pp 1-26; doi:10.1007/s11027-021-09938-5

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Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Volume 26, pp 1-19; doi:10.1007/s11027-021-09946-5

Abstract:
The objective of this paper is to analyse role of forest industry in meeting energy and climate targets that aim to mitigating global change. Finland as an important forest industry country with the ambitious target of becoming carbon neutral by 2035 is selected to a target county. This study aims to present a plausible assessment of the future of the Finnish forest industry until 2035 based on literature and a scenario building approach. The focus is on energy use and fossil carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The results suggest that electricity consumption will decrease, whereas electricity production will increase, which indicates that forest industry can provide more renewable electricity to the grid. Heat consumption may even increase as a result from building new biorefineries, but those mills can most probably meet their heat demand by combusting biofuels. Changes in forest industry’s direct fossil CO2 emissions can reduce Finnish fossil CO2 emissions 2─4% in comparison to 2018. Biofuels production is likely to rise, but the extent remains to be seen. It is concluded that the Finnish forest industry can contribute significantly to meeting national climate policy targets, and forest industry in general can play a role in mitigating global change. Additionally, it was found that development of the Finnish forest industry will probably be limited by the requirement for sustainable wood harvesting, which may also be a problem for other forest industry countries.
Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Volume 26, pp 1-15; doi:10.1007/s11027-021-09948-3

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Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Volume 26, pp 1-20; doi:10.1007/s11027-021-09947-4

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, Tuomo Kalliokoski, Aleksi Lehtonen, Olli Salminen
Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Volume 26, pp 1-17; doi:10.1007/s11027-021-09942-9

Abstract:
Forest biomass can be used in two different ways to limit the growth of the atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations: (1) to provide negative emissions through sequestration of carbon into forests and harvested wood products or (2) to avoid GHG emissions through substitution of non-renewable raw materials with wood. We study the trade-offs and synergies between these strategies using three different Finnish national-level forest scenarios between 2015 and 2044 as examples. We demonstrate how GHG emissions change when wood harvest rates are increased. We take into account CO2 and other greenhouse gas flows in the forest, the decay rate of harvested wood products and fossil-based CO2 emissions that can be avoided by substituting alternative materials with wood derived from increased harvests. We considered uncertainties of key parameters by using stochastic simulation. According to our results, an increase in harvest rates in Finland increased the total net GHG flow to the atmosphere virtually certainly or very likely, given the uncertainties and time frame considered. This was because the increased biomass-based CO2 and other greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere together with decreased carbon sequestration into the forest were very likely higher than the avoided fossil-based CO2 emissions. The reverse of this conclusion would require that compared to what was studied in this paper, the share of long-living wood products in the product mix would be higher, carbon dioxide from bioenergy production would be captured and stored, and reduction in forest carbon equivalent net sink due to wood harvesting would be minimized.
Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Volume 26, pp 1-24; doi:10.1007/s11027-021-09940-x

Abstract:
Science–policy engagement efforts to accelerate climate action in agricultural systems are key to enable the sector to contribute to climate and food security goals. However, lessons to improve science–policy engagement efforts in this context mostly come from successful efforts and are limited in terms of empirical scope. Moreover, lessons have not been generated systematically from failed science–policy engagement efforts. Such analysis using lessons from failure management can improve or even transform the efficacy of efforts. To address this knowledge gap, we examined challenges and failures faced in science–policy engagement efforts of the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS). We developed an explanatory framework inspired by Cash et al.’s criteria for successful knowledge systems for sustainable development: credibility, salience, and legitimacy, complemented with insights from the wider literature. Using this framework in a survey, we identified factors which explain failure. To effectively manage these factors, we propose a novel approach for researchers working at the science–policy interface to fail intelligently, which involves planning for failure, minimizing risks, effective design, making failures visible, and learning from failures. This approach needs to be complemented by actions at the knowledge system level to create an enabling environment for science–policy interfaces.
, Munir J. Rusan, Mohammed I. Al-Qinna, Fayez A. Abdulla
Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Volume 26, pp 1-21; doi:10.1007/s11027-021-09944-7

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