Health Sociology Review

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 1446-1242 / 1839-3551
Current Publisher: Informa UK Limited (10.1080)
Former Publisher: E-Content Management (10.5172)
Total articles ≅ 750
Current Coverage
SCOPUS
SSCI
LOCKSS
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Latest articles in this journal

Zachary Simoni
Published: 22 September 2020
Health Sociology Review pp 1-16; doi:10.1080/14461242.2020.1820364

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Jelmer Brüggemann
Published: 22 September 2020
Health Sociology Review pp 1-14; doi:10.1080/14461242.2020.1820367

Abstract:
Treatments for prostate cancer have many potential side effects such as a loss of erection, weaker orgasms, and incontinence. These are all bodily changes that may challenge dominant masculine ideals. In this article, I use Persson's repair work to describe how men tackle these side effects, and I describe the trouble their repair work elicits in terms of masculinity. I analyse interviews with eleven Swedish men, all treated for prostate cancer, and show that such work is done in three ways. Bodily repair work elicits the work men do to restore bodily functions, often through medical technologies. Relational repair work describes how relations with (potential) others shape men’s bodily and sexual concerns, and the ways relations redefine such concerns. Age marking as repair emphasises how age is used in the redefinitions of norms about masculinities and aging bodies, both in relation to oneself and others. The analysis highlights how men’s repair work is multifaceted, and is performed against the backdrop of dominant discourses on masculinity, medicine and old age. The analysis of such repair work is valuable to research on how masculinity is constructed in the light of treatment side effects and older age.
Brooke Maria Hollingshead, Gary W. Dowsett, Adam Bourne
Published: 16 September 2020
Health Sociology Review pp 1-15; doi:10.1080/14461242.2020.1820366

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Håvard T. Rydland
Published: 6 September 2020
Health Sociology Review pp 1-17; doi:10.1080/14461242.2020.1811748

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Alexandra James, Jennifer Power, Andrea Waling
Published: 3 September 2020
Health Sociology Review pp 1-18; doi:10.1080/14461242.2020.1811749

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Michelle Addison, Eileen Kaner, Liam Spencer, William McGovern, Ruth McGovern, Eilish Gilvarry, Amy O’Donnell
Published: 2 September 2020
Health Sociology Review pp 1-16; doi:10.1080/14461242.2020.1811747

Abstract:
Amphetamine Type Stimulants (ATS) are increasingly used drugs globally. There is limited evidence about what shapes ATS use at critical turning points located within drug using pathways. Using turning point theory, as part of a life course approach, the ATTUNE study aimed to understand which social, economic and individual factors shape pathways into and out of ATS use. Qualitative, semi-structured interviews (n = 70) were undertaken with individuals who had used ATS, or had been exposed to them at least once. Our findings show that turning points for initiation were linked to pleasure, curiosity, boredom and declining mental health; increased use was linked to positive effects experienced at initiation and multiple life-stressors, leading to more intense use. Decreased use was prompted by pivotal events and sustained through continued wellbeing, day-to-day structure, and non-using social networks. We argue that the heterogeneity of these individuals challenges stereotypes of stimulant use allied to nightclubs and ‘hedonism’. Further, at critical turning points for recovery, the use of services for problematic ATS consumption was low because users prioritised their alcohol or opioid use when seeking help. There is a need to develop service provision, training, and better outreach to individuals who need support at critical turning points.
Jacinthe Flore, Kiran Pienaar
Published: 10 August 2020
Health Sociology Review pp 1-15; doi:10.1080/14461242.2020.1803101

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Lucy Nicholas, Christy E. Newman, Jessica R. Botfield, Gareth Terry, Deborah Bateson, Peter Aggleton
Published: 13 July 2020
Health Sociology Review pp 1-16; doi:10.1080/14461242.2020.1789486

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Kirsten Harley, Karen F. Willis
Published: 9 July 2020
Health Sociology Review pp 1-15; doi:10.1080/14461242.2020.1789487

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
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