Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 01959131 / 15300315
Current Publisher: Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health) (10.1249)
Former Publisher: Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health) (10.1097)
Total articles ≅ 83,849
Google Scholar h5-index: 70
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Latest articles in this journal

J. Luke Pryor, Robert G. Leija, Jacobo Morales, Adam W. Potter, David P. Looney, Riana R. Pryor, David Hostler, Kristen C. Cochrane-Snyman
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise; doi:10.1249/mss.0000000000002520

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Emily M. Heiston, Nicole M. Gilbertson, Natalie Zm. Eichner, Steven K. Malin
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise; doi:10.1249/mss.0000000000002515

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Jenna B. Wowdzia, Tara-Leigh McHugh, Jane Thornton, Allison Sivak, Michelle F. Mottola, Margie H. Davenport
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise; doi:10.1249/mss.0000000000002510

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Frances C. Taylor, David W. Dunstan, Elly Fletcher, Melanie K. Townsend, Robyn N. Larsen, Kym Rickards, Nirav Maniar, Matthew Buman, Paddy C. Dempsey, Anju E. Joham, et al.
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise; doi:10.1249/mss.0000000000002513

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Alexandre Roy, Hassan Rivaz, Amanda Rizk, Stephane Frenette, Mathieu Boily, Maryse Fortin
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise; doi:10.1249/mss.0000000000002514

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Jasdeep Kaur, Thales C. Barbosa, Damsara Nandadeva, Benjamin E. Young, Brandi Y. Stephens, R. Matthew Brothers, Paul J. Fadel
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise; doi:10.1249/mss.0000000000002511

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Anouk E. Hiensch, Sara Mijwel, David Bargiela, Yvonne Wengström, Anne M. May, Helene Rundqvist
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise; doi:10.1249/mss.0000000000002490

Abstract:
PURPOSE The randomized controlled OptiTrain trial showed beneficial effects on fatigue after a 16-week exercise intervention in patients with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy. We hypothesize that exercise alters systemic inflammation and that this partially mediates the beneficial effects of exercise on fatigue. METHODS Two hundred and forty women scheduled for chemotherapy were randomized to 16 weeks of resistance and high-intensity interval training (RT-HIIT), moderate-intensity aerobic and high-intensity interval training (AT-HIIT) or usual care (UC). In the current mechanistic analyses, we included all participants with >60% attendance and a random selection of controls (RT-HIIT=30, AT-HIIT=27, UC=29). Fatigue (Piper Fatigue Scale) and ninety-two markers (e.g. IL-6, TNFα) were assessed at baseline and post-intervention. Mediation analyses were conducted to explore whether changes in inflammation markers mediated the effect of exercise on fatigue. RESULTS Overall, chemotherapy led to an increase in inflammation. The increase in IL-6 (pleiotropic cytokine) and CD8a (T-cell surface glycoprotein) was, however, significantly less pronounced following RT-HIIT compared to UC (-0.47 (95%CI -0.87;-0.07) and -0.28 (-0.57;0.004), respectively). Changes in IL-6 and CD8a significantly mediated the exercise effects on both general and physical fatigue by 32.0% and 27.7%, and 31.2% and 26.4%, respectively. No significant between-group differences in inflammatory markers at 16 weeks were found between AT-HIIT and UC. CONCLUSION This study is the first showing that supervised RT-HIIT partially counteracted the increase in inflammation during chemotherapy, i.e. IL-6 and soluble CD8a, which resulted in lower fatigue levels post-intervention. Exercise including both resistance and high-intensity aerobic training might be put forward as an effective treatment to reduce chemotherapy-induced inflammation and subsequent fatigue.
Peter Alway, Paul Felton, Katherine Brooke-Wavell, Nicholas Peirce, Mark King
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise; doi:10.1249/mss.0000000000002512

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Pedro Lopez, Dennis R. Taaffe, Robert U. Newton, Daniel A. Galvão
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise; doi:10.1249/mss.0000000000002503

Abstract:
Purpose Resistance training (RT) improves an array of treatment-related adverse effects in men with prostate cancer, however, the minimal dosage required is unknown. We systematically reviewed the RT effects in prostate cancer patients to determine the minimal dosage regarding the exercise components (type, duration, volume, and intensity) on body composition, physical function, muscle strength, cardiorespiratory fitness, body mass index (BMI), and prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Methods Using PRISMA guidelines, MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, SPORTDiscus, and Web of Science databases were searched. Eligible randomised controlled trials examined prostate cancer patients undertaking resistance-based exercise programs during or following treatment. Meta-analysis was undertaken when more than 3 studies were included. Associations between mean differences and the exercise components were tested by univariate and multivariate meta-regression analysis. Results Twenty-four papers describing 22 trials and involving 1,888 prostate cancer patients were included. Exercise improved fat mass (-1% in body fat and -0.5 kg in fat mass), lean mass (+0.5 kg in lean and appendicular lean mass), functional capacity (i.e., chair rise, 400-m test, 6-m fast walk and stair climb tests) and fitness outcomes (i.e., VO2 peak and muscle strength) (P=0.040 -
Mary C. Hidde, Matthew Howell, Alexa Debord, Heather J. Leach
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, Volume 52, pp 2055-2055; doi:10.1249/mss.0000000000002414

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