Plant Breeding

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ISSN / EISSN : 0179-9541 / 1439-0523
Current Publisher: Wiley (10.1111)
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Total articles ≅ 4,665
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, AbduRahman Beshir Issa, Ehtisham Shakeel Khokhar
Published: 10 May 2021
by Wiley
Plant Breeding; doi:10.1111/pbr.12923

Abstract:
Lysine and tryptophan are two essential amino acids and these are deficit in maize grain thus posing the problem of nutritional deficiencies in the consumers. A wide range of deficiency symptoms like cognitive disorder, kwashiorkor disease, reduced appetite, impaired skeleton development, delayed growth and aberrant behaviour are associated with lysine and tryptophan deficiency. These amino acids are also important to cure the Pellagra disease. Researchers identified several mutants in maize especially opaque‐2 which are responsible for higher lysine and tryptophan contents. Few years later, it was observed that opaque‐2 mutant has several pleiotropic effects on maize grain and plant. Efforts of researchers are spanning over the period of four decades to develop quality protein maize (QPM). QPM is described as nutritionally superior maize with high lysine and tryptophan contents and desired kernel characteristics as compared to its normal maize counterparts. Biological value of QPM was almost equivalent to egg protein. Breeding of maize for quality protein is based on three genetic systems like opaque‐2 genetic system, endosperm modifier genetic system and associated gene systems. Keeping in view the importance of QPM, current review article is compiled to discuss the genetic basis, genetic systems and breeding strategies. Timeline for various events is also drafted like discovery of various mutants, several conventional and modern approaches for development and deployment of QPM varieties across the world. Despite its nutritional benefits, the rate of adoption of QPM is generally at low pace in the developing world and this review article discuss the challenges and potential opportunities for QPM adoption.
Nitish R. Prakash, Rajkumar U. Zunjare, Vignesh Muthusamy, Mayank Rai, Amit Kumar, Satish K. Guleria, Vinay Bhatt, Jeetram Choudhary, Gulab Chand, Sunil K. Jaiswal, et al.
Published: 10 May 2021
by Wiley
Plant Breeding; doi:10.1111/pbr.12924

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Johannes Trini, , Elmar A. Weissmann,
Published: 3 May 2021
by Wiley
Plant Breeding; doi:10.1111/pbr.12893

Abstract:
Time‐ and resource‐efficient identification of promising lines is of utmost importance in hybrid breeding. Here, we present a novel approach to evaluate female candidate lines for single‐cross hybrids, which saves four to five generations by obtaining general (GCA) and specific combining ability (SCA) effect estimates prior to the introgression of the female lines into a male sterility‐inducing cytoplasm. The approach is based on three‐way crosses and we exemplarily demonstrate its power by predicting 57 single‐cross hybrids of triticale. Prediction accuracies based on GCA or GCA and SCA effects estimated in three‐way hybrids were generally superior to those based on mid‐parent values. Notably, a high proportion of SCA variance had only little influence on the prediction accuracies based on three‐way hybrids. Simulation studies support the empirical findings and illustrate approaches for further optimization. Thus, the presented approach appears highly valuable and has the potential to increase selection gain in hybrid breeding.
Rabia Faridi, Birger Koopman, Antje Schierholt, Mohamed B. Ali, Stefanie Apel,
Published: 3 May 2021
by Wiley
Plant Breeding; doi:10.1111/pbr.12918

Abstract:
Ascochyta fabae is a fungal pathogen responsible for marked yield losses in spring and winter faba beans worldwide. The aim of this genome‐wide association study (GWAS) using 188 diverse winter faba bean inbred lines was to exploit earlier Ascochyta blight resistance studies and to identify new resistance loci. Phenotyping after artificial inoculation under controlled conditions revealed significant variation for all eight scored disease traits. This GWAS was based on 1829 AFLP marker and 229 SNP marker, including 17 so‐called ‘guide’ SNP markers. The latter were identified by map fragment alignments between the consensus smap of Webb et al., (2016, Plant Biotechnology Journal, 14, 177–185) and three earlier published Ascochyta blight resistance studies. A total of 12 markers were found significantly associated with six traits, explaining 5.6% to 21.7% of the phenotypic variance. One ‘guide’ SNP on chromosome III co‐localizes with the known resistance QTL Af1 on chromosome III. Probably nine new resistance trait‐associated marker loci were identified which will improve resistance breeding on winter faba beans and support a broader inclusion of the crop into rotations.
Jianguo Xie, Qiao Wang, Zhanguo Zhang, Xin Xiong, Mingliang Yang, Zhaoming Qi, Dawei Xin, Rongsheng Zhu, Mingming Sun, Xiaohui Dong, et al.
Published: 3 May 2021
by Wiley
Plant Breeding; doi:10.1111/pbr.12920

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 20 April 2021
by Wiley
Plant Breeding, Volume 140; doi:10.1111/pbr.12836

Jatinder Singh, , Harpreet Singh, Ashok Kumar, Manpreet Jaidka, Kamalpreet S. Mandahal, Shiv Kumar,
Published: 14 April 2021
by Wiley
Plant Breeding; doi:10.1111/pbr.12917

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Moein Shajari, Forouzandeh Soltani, Mohammad Reza Bihamta, Michael Alabboud
Published: 26 March 2021
by Wiley
Plant Breeding; doi:10.1111/pbr.12915

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, , Liezel Herselman
Published: 23 March 2021
by Wiley
Plant Breeding; doi:10.1111/pbr.12913

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Abdolhadi Hossainzadeh, Hassan Zeinali, Mohammad Reza Naghavi
Published: 19 March 2021
by Wiley
Plant Breeding; doi:10.1111/pbr.12914

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
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