Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews

Journal Information
ISSN : 1364-0321
Current Publisher: Elsevier BV (10.1016)
Former Publisher: Elsevier España, S.L.U. (10.1016)
Total articles ≅ 10,810
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Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Volume 143; doi:10.1016/j.rser.2021.110915

Abstract:
To guide effective energy policy-making towards a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms relevant to behavioral change, it is important not only to investigate whether energy interventions succeed or not, but also to explore the underlying reasons that shape each result. However, certain limitations are hindering a global consensus on the effectiveness of two popular types of energy interventions: the ones based on social influence (peer pressure) and the ones based on economic instruments (rewards and penalties). The aim of this paper is to provide a new perspective on the exploration of the factors that affect the effectiveness of such interventions. Based on a review of studies published during the last two decades, an agenda of six critical research questions is thus set up to identify new priority areas of research. The relevance of this agenda is illustrated via a survey that explores the potential of peer pressure and economic interventions designed to influence residential space cooling energy savings in an urban setting. The survey results provide evidence that such a potential can be affected by the type of targeted behavior (efficiency or conservation), by householder characteristics (openness to change and environmental awareness), and by the existence of past influence events. Interestingly, peer pressure is regarded as highly influential independently of the channel through which it is communicated, i.e. offline or online. These observations can assist public policy in countries with a growing emphasis on changing people's energy behavior to redefine the targeting scope of interventions, thus strengthening their potential.
, Pak Kin Wong, Chun Shun Cheung, Zhi Ning, Ka-Fu Yung, Jing Zhao, Nirmal Kumar Gali, Alireza Valipour Berenjestanaki
Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Volume 143; doi:10.1016/j.rser.2021.110970

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, Celso Correia de Souza,
Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Volume 143; doi:10.1016/j.rser.2021.110958

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, S. Bauer, C.V. Hirschhausen, , L. Göke
Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Volume 143; doi:10.1016/j.rser.2021.110836

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, K. Lindberg, F. Kienast, M. Hunziker
Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Volume 143; doi:10.1016/j.rser.2021.110896

Abstract:
In response to the effects of climate change, many countries are realigning their energy systems to the principle of sustainability. An energy system change will lead to the development of substantial renewable energy infrastructure (mostly wind and photovoltaic) in landscapes with effects on perceived landscape quality and socio-political acceptance. Both direct perceptive effects of physical landscape structures and latent meanings associated with those structures potentially affect their acceptance. This work evaluates the role of landscape-technology fit (derived from place-technology fit) representing the extent to which alternatives within each of these two components “fit” together (e.g., does a given type of renewable energy infrastructure fit well within some landscapes but not others?). It also evaluates the role of latent meanings ascribed to landscapes and renewable energy infrastructure within that mentioned “fit” decision as well as the role of prior experience (exposure) to both. The study is based on a survey of Swiss citizens in a representative online panel (n = 1062). To estimate preferences for diverse renewable energy infrastructure scenarios across landscape types, a discrete choice model was implemented. Meanings ascribed to landscapes and renewable energy infrastructure were included in a second component of the survey. An innovative hybrid choice model approach facilitated integration of latent and observed variables in a hierarchy of predictors. Results show that most effects were statistically significant. Landscape-technology fit functioned as a moderator between choice attributes and preferences; in turn, it is predicted by landscape and renewable energy meanings, which are predicted by relevant prior experience (exposure).
Magnus Zingler Stummann, Martin Høj, Jostein Gabrielsen, Lasse Røngaard Clausen, Peter Arendt Jensen,
Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Volume 143; doi:10.1016/j.rser.2021.110960

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Ömer Gönül, ,
Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Volume 143; doi:10.1016/j.rser.2021.110913

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Hongsheng Dong, Jiaqi Wang, Zhuoxue Xie, Bin Wang, ,
Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Volume 143; doi:10.1016/j.rser.2021.110928

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A. García-Segura, F. Sutter, L. Martínez-Arcos, T.J. Reche-Navarro, F. Wiesinger, J. Wette, F. Buendía-Martínez,
Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Volume 143; doi:10.1016/j.rser.2021.110879

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, Julie Byrne
Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Volume 143; doi:10.1016/j.rser.2021.110892

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