JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute

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ISSN / EISSN : 00278874 / 14602105
Current Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP) (10.1093)
Total articles ≅ 30,449
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Monica E D’Arcy, David Castenson, Charles F Lynch, Amy R Kahn, Lindsay M Morton, Meredith S Shiels, Ruth M Pfeiffer, Eric A Engels
JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute; doi:10.1093/jnci/djaa078

Abstract:
Background Immunosuppressed solid organ transplant recipients [SOTRs] have elevated rates of certain rare cancers caused by viruses. Evaluating risk of rare cancers among SOTRs may provide etiological clues for additional cancers linked to poor immunity and viral infections. Methods We performed a cohort study of 262,455 SOTRs (1987-2014) from the US SOTR registry linked to 17 population-based cancer registries. First cancers in SOTRs were categorized using an established classification scheme based on site and histology. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) compared risk in SOTRs to the general population. We used Poisson regression to calculate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) according to immune-related SOTR characteristics, including time since transplant (i.e., duration of immunosuppression). All statistical tests are two-sided. Results We examined 694 distinct cancer subtypes, with 33 manifesting statistically significantly elevated SIRs (Bonferroni p < 7.2 x 10-5). All 33 are rare (incidence <6 per 100,000 person-years) and several have known viral etiology (e.g. Merkel cell carcinoma (SIR = 24.7, 95%CI = 20.8 to 29.1). Additional cancers that were increased include squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) of the lip (SIR range = 18.3-19.8), eye/adnexa (SIR = 13.8, 95%CI = 7.9 to 22.3), salivary gland (SIR = 9.3, 95%CI = 6.1 to 13.5), and nasal cavity/sinuses (SIR = 4.5, 95%CI = 2.8 to 6.8); sebaceous adenocarcinoma (SIR = 34.3, 95%CI = 26.3 to 44.0); malignant fibrous histiocytoma (15.4); and subtypes of bladder, kidney, lung, and colon cancer (SIR range = 3.2-13.3). Incidence of several cancers increased over time since transplant (ptrend<0.05), including SCCs of the lip, salivary gland, and anogenital sites. Conclusions SOTRs experience elevated rates of several rare cancers. Because some of these cancers exhibit aggressive behavior with poor outcomes, it is important to further characterize the role of immunity and the potential involvement of oncogenic viruses to improve prevention and treatment.
Ahmedin Jemal, MaryBeth B Culp, Jiemin Ma, Farhad Islami, Stacey A Fedewa
JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute; doi:10.1093/jnci/djaa068

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Marion Piñeros, Les Mery, Isabelle Soerjomataram, Freddie Bray, Eva Steliarova-Foucher
JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute; doi:10.1093/jnci/djaa069

Abstract:
The World Health Organization recently launched the Global Initiative for Childhood Cancer (GICC) aiming to substantially increase survival among children with cancer by 2030. The ultimate goal concerns particularly less developed countries where survival estimates are considerably lower than in high-income countries where children with cancer attain approximately 80% survival. Given the vast gap in high-quality data availability between more and less developed countries, measuring the success of the GICC will also require substantial support to childhood cancer registries to enable them to provide survival data at the population level. Based on our experience acquired at the International Agency for Research on Cancer in global cancer surveillance we hereby review crucial aspects to consider in the development of childhood cancer registration and present our vision on how the Global Initiative for Cancer Registry Development (GICR) can accelerate the measurement of the outcome of children with cancer.
Julie R Palmer, Eric C Polley, Chunling Hu, Esther M John, Christopher Haiman, Steven N Hart, Mia Gaudet, Tuya Pal, Hoda Anton-Culver, Amy Trentham-Dietz, et al.
JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute; doi:10.1093/jnci/djaa040

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Anne Marie McCarthy, Katrina Armstrong
JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute; doi:10.1093/jnci/djaa042

Aziz Zaanan, Julie Henriques, Romain Cohen, David Sefrioui, Camille Evrard, Christelle De La Fouchardiere, Thierry LeComte, Thomas Aparicio, Magali Svrcek, Julien Taieb, et al.
JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute; doi:10.1093/jnci/djaa072

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Kevin J Harrington, Denis Soulières, Christophe Le Tourneau, Jose Dinis, Lisa F Licitra, Myung-Ju Ahn, Ainara Soria, Jean-Pascal H Machiels, Nicolas Mach, Ranee Mehra, et al.
JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute; doi:10.1093/jnci/djaa063

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Francesco Schettini, Fabiola Giudici, Mario Giuliano, Massimo Cristofanilli, Grazia Arpino, Lucia Del Mastro, Fabio Puglisi, Sabino De Placido, Ida Paris, Pietro De Placido, et al.
JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute; doi:10.1093/jnci/djaa071

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Lauren R Teras, Alpa V Patel, Stephanie A Smith-Warner, The Pooling Project Of Prospective Studies Of Diet And Cancer
JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute; doi:10.1093/jnci/djaa027

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