Irish Journal of Medical Science (1971 -)

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 0021-1265 / 1863-4362
Published by: Springer Nature (10.1007)
Total articles ≅ 14,113
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Correction
, Aisling McCann, Claire Power, Eimear Gilchrist, Helen O’Byrne, Jean Roulston, Sheila McCrory, Emma Curtis, Michael Barrett, Sinead Harty
Irish Journal of Medical Science (1971 -) pp 1-1; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11845-022-03122-7

, Saadat Saleemi, Manuja Premaratne
Irish Journal of Medical Science (1971 -) pp 1-6; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11845-022-03121-8

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Correction
, Matthew Fahy, Jarlath C. Bolger, Patrick A. Boland, Colm Neary, Gerry P. McEntee, John B. Conneely
Irish Journal of Medical Science (1971 -) pp 1-1; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11845-022-03123-6

, Niall J. O’Sullivan, Vidushi Sharma, Isabella Sebastian, Roisin Meagher, Dalal Alomairi, Ebraheem H. Alhouti, Claire L. Donohoe, Michael E. Kelly
Irish Journal of Medical Science (1971 -) pp 1-6; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11845-022-03118-3

Abstract:
Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted the traditional delivery of medical education. Medical education programmes have had to cope with limitations on face-to-face learning, and accelerate the adoption of digital learning. In addition, the pandemic has potential serious implications on the psychological well-being of medical students. We aim to assess the changes in perceptions and experiences of medical students as a consequence of this pandemic. Methods: Cross-sectional survey of medical students at Trinity College Dublin (TCD) between March and April 2022 was performed. The survey explored student satisfaction with the current education program, teaching delivery and the impact of COVID-19 on education and student well-being. Results: 175 medical students participated in the survey. Overall, the majority of students were happy/neutral with their medical education. 93 (53.1%) felt tutorials and problem-based learning (PBL) to be the most effective method of teaching, followed by laboratory and clinical placements in 78 participants (44.6%) and hybrid-learning in 85 participants (48.6%). There was a mixed reaction to the changes in the delivery of education brought about by the pandemic. 67 participants (40.6%) felt happy with the changes, another 64 participants (38.8%) felt neutral, whilst only 34 participants (20.6%) were unhappy. However, most participants felt the pandemic negatively impacted their mental health, with 96 participants (55.8%) reporting negative responses. 58% of participants (n = 102/175) reported utilising the student support services at university campus and 49% (n = 50) were satisfied with their services. Conclusion: Digital content and delivery confer the benefit of greater flexibility in learning, the ability to learn at one’s own pace and in a preferred environment, however lacks the advantage of bedside teaching and hands-on training. Our findings reinforce the potential advantages of online learning.
, Gulsum Karaahmetli, , Cevdet Aydin, Oya Topaloglu, Reyhan Ersoy, Bekir Cakir
Irish Journal of Medical Science (1971 -) pp 1-6; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11845-022-03107-6

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Ahmad Ayman Dabbousi, , Lemir Majed El Ayoubi, Omar Ismail, Bachir Zreika, Pascale Salameh
Irish Journal of Medical Science (1971 -) pp 1-8; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11845-022-03089-5

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, Aisling McCann, Claire Power, Eimear Gilchrist, Helen O’Byrne, Jean Roulston, Sheila McCrory, Emma Curtis, Michael Barrett, Sinead Harty
Irish Journal of Medical Science (1971 -) pp 1-3; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11845-022-03115-6

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
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