Computing in Science & Engineering

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 1521-9615 / 1558-366X
Total articles ≅ 2,202
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Computing in Science & Engineering, pp 1-1; https://doi.org/10.1109/mcse.2021.3098509

Abstract:
State of the art Engineering and Science codes have grown in complexity dramatically over the last two decades. As a consequence application teams have adopted more sophisticated development strategies, leveraging third party libraries, deploying comprehensive testing and using advanced debugging and profiling tools. In todays environment of diverse hardware platforms, these applications also desire performance portability - avoiding the need to duplicate work for various platforms - which makes it necessary that these tools and librariesalso work across the various systems. The Kokkos EcoSystem provides that portable software stack. Based on the Kokkos Core Programming Model, the EcoSystem provides math libraries, interoperability capabilities with Python and Fortran, and Tools for analysing, debugging, and optimizing applications. In this paper we will provide an overview of the components, discuss some specific use cases, and highlight how co-designing these components enables a more developer friendly experience.
Computing in Science & Engineering, Volume 23, pp 3-4; https://doi.org/10.1109/mcse.2021.3090646

Abstract:
Presents the table of contents for this issue of the publication.
Computing in Science & Engineering, Volume 23, pp 17-17; https://doi.org/10.1109/mcse.2021.3090820

Abstract:
Prospective authors are requested to submit new, unpublished manuscripts for inclusion in the upcoming event described in this call for papers.
, Andreas Klockner, Prabhu Ramachandran, Rollin Thomas
Computing in Science & Engineering, Volume 23, pp 5-7; https://doi.org/10.1109/mcse.2021.3088549

Abstract:
The articles in this special section focus on the modern approach to enabling scientific progress with computers with particular emphasis on high-performance heterogeneous systems.
Computing in Science & Engineering, Volume 23; https://doi.org/10.1109/mcse.2021.3090636

Abstract:
Prospective authors are requested to submit new, unpublished manuscripts for inclusion in the upcoming event described in this call for papers.
, , Kevin Henares, Cristina Ruiz-Martin, Nargess Memarsadeghi
Computing in Science & Engineering, Volume 23, pp 80-84; https://doi.org/10.1109/mcse.2021.3075760

Abstract:
The classic susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) models provide a good approach for modeling the spread of communicable diseases. However, this model is not suitable to understand the spatial implications on the spreading of the disease or the impact of individual interactions. Our open-source platform uses an extension of the classic SIR models for rapidly prototyping different aspects of virus spread and infection of the population using a spatial approach. This platform is useful for studying the spread of the disease and analyzing the simulation results with advanced visualization tools.
Computing in Science & Engineering, Volume 23, pp 28-28; https://doi.org/10.1109/mcse.2021.3093173

Abstract:
Prospective authors are requested to submit new, unpublished manuscripts for inclusion in the upcoming event described in this call for papers.
M. A. Heroux, Jeffrey C. Carver, Karla Morris
Computing in Science & Engineering, Volume 23, pp 69-72; https://doi.org/10.1109/mcse.2021.3082643

Abstract:
Scientific software underpins a large and growing number of scientific discoveries and engineering advances. At the same time, it is a small portion of the total software produced, has little literature, or focus on improvement and community building relative to other, larger software domains. The Collegeville Workshop Series on Scientific Software provides a platform for scientific software teams and stakeholders to exchange information on the nature, challenges, and technical and cultural approaches to improve key elements of the scientific software enterprise. By soliciting white papers, posters, and tea-time themes, these workshops gather content to provide a three-day live event, plus recorded presentations and interviews that enable community members to learn from each other. The outcomes from the first two workshops, in 2019 and 2020, have provided a body of knowledge and experience that expands the size and recognition of software as an important part of the scientific enterprise. The 2021 workshop, focused on software teams, intends to further expand the conversation, and continue to build community around scientific software to improve its impact on science and engineering.
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