Journal of Adult and Continuing Education

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 1477-9714 / 1479-7194
Published by: SAGE Publications (10.1177)
Total articles ≅ 401
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SCOPUS
LOCKSS
ESCI
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Anna Sverdlik, Sonia Rahimi, Robert J Vallerand
Journal of Adult and Continuing Education; https://doi.org/10.1177/14779714211037359

Abstract:
University students’ passion for their studies has been previously demonstrated to be important for both their academic performance and their personal well-being. However, no studies to date have explored the role of passion for one’s studies on both academic and personal outcomes in a single model. The present research sought to determine the role of passion in adult university students’ self-regulated learning and psychological well-being (Study 1), as well as the process by which passion shapes these outcomes, namely academic emotions, in Study 2. It was hypothesised that harmonious passion would positively predict both self-regulated learning and psychological well-being in Study 1. Furthermore, the mediating role of academic emotions between passion and outcomes was tested using a prospective design over time in Study 2. Results provided support for the proposed model. Implications for future research and practice focusing on the role of passion in facilitating adaptive emotions, use of self-regulation and well-being in adult students are discussed.
Vollan O Ochieng, Moses Ngware
Journal of Adult and Continuing Education; https://doi.org/10.1177/14779714211037357

Abstract:
Investment in sub-Sahara Africa's (SSA’s) youth through effective capacity development, involving adoption of contemporary skills development approaches, is integral in alleviating the region’s high youth unemployment rates as it will equip the youth with skills needed for employment. Skills that are needed are those that holistically develop the youth skills-set, including technical/hard and soft-skills, dubbed whole youth development (WYD) skills. This paper thus explores Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) students’ understanding of soft-skills and its development. The paper utilizes data collected from a TVET study in Kenya that was carried in 9 of the 47 counties, targeting learners aged 15–24 years. The selected counties were those that had national polytechnics for national representation, except one (Turkana county), which was selected to represent youth from marginalized counties. A descriptive cross-sectional study design was adopted for this study. The findings indicate that there is a good understanding of soft-skills among the targeted respondents, with extra-curricular activities playing a key role in promoting TVET students’ soft-skills. However, inadequate human resource and low level of awareness on soft-skills among instructors contribute to inadequate soft-skills learning. This calls for a concerted effort among key education stakeholders on the development of instructors’ and institutions’ capacities for a plausible soft-skills outcome.
Oran Devilly, Jamil Jasin, Sok Mui Lim, Yong Lim Foo
Journal of Adult and Continuing Education; https://doi.org/10.1177/14779714211030950

Abstract:
The increase in the number of adults returning to complete their university education as ‘non-traditional students’ brings more attention to the challenges of a standard degree format. This paper examines the experiences of seven non-traditional students undergoing a cooperative education programme in Singapore, where students would alternate spending a few days in a week at a university while working full-time for the remaining days, in relation to the challenges and opportunities of the programme. Using qualitative thematic analysis, we discovered four themes greatly affected by the programme design – motivations for enrolling, transferability of knowledge, work–study balance and coping mechanisms. Overall, some obstacles hindering adults from continuing education were addressed by this cooperative education programme. The strong integration of work and study roles ensured that adults did not need to leave their job before starting university, reducing time and money-related pressures while increasing their commitment level to education. Additionally, rigid institutional practices were mitigated by the flexibility given by teaching faculty and work supervisors. We suggested several improvements to better suit the rising number of adults wanting to attain a degree. With the research results and recommendations proposed herein, this paper is useful to various universities willing to adopt cooperative education.
Denise Calhoun
Journal of Adult and Continuing Education; https://doi.org/10.1177/14779714211026939

Abstract:
This paper demonstrates the effects of education on cognitive functioning which could serve as an alternative preventive method to halt or delay cognitive decline in older adults. The purpose of this proposal is to discuss and illustrate the benefits of improving cognitive ability through continuing education. As such, taking advantage of educational programmes that are already in place would not only provide mental stimulation for older adults, but would be a source for social networking, as well as technology training and physical education activities. To establish a link between cognition and education, this paper provides examples from a number of studies as well as a review of a longitudinal study on educational differences in the prevalence of dementia. The findings of this systematic review revealed a connection between cognitive decline and education after considering regions and economic status. Suggestions from these reviews imply that keeping one’s mind stimulated could be influential in delaying the onset of dementia resulting in possibly extending the time older adults are independent.
, Av Volnuhin, Aa Gertsog, Va Zhukov, Tv Zaugol'Nikova, Eo Samokhina, Tv Chegayeva
Journal of Adult and Continuing Education; https://doi.org/10.1177/14779714211026688

Abstract:
Introduction The article is devoted to the current state of continuing medical education for general practitioners in the city of Moscow. Materials and methods During the study, sociological, analytical and statistical research methods were applied. Domestic and foreign literary sources, as well as regulatory documents relevant to the research problem, were analysed. A questionnaire was developed to survey general practitioners working in Moscow. Results of the study The results of the study demonstrated a lack of satisfaction with the organisation and content of training in the previous format, the absence of significant changes in the learning objectives following the education reform and an ambiguous attitude towards this reform. The minimum continuing education requirements for general practitioners working in the city of Moscow were shown to consist of day release, short-term training, theoretical and practical orientation and the application of contemporary educational technologies. Discussion and conclusion Conceptual approaches to the development of continuing medical education in the field of general medical practice in Moscow were formulated. These comprised organisation of training, setting of learning objectives, selection of forms and methods of training, determination of interactive training content, application of a competency-based approach and individualisation of the educational path.
Olivia Adwoa Tiwaah Frimpong Kwapong
Journal of Adult and Continuing Education; https://doi.org/10.1177/14779714211024678

Abstract:
Covid-19 has brought surprises in the educational landscape. Educational institutions had to hurriedly migrate all teaching, learning and assessment activities to online platforms. Such was the case of adult learners who had signed on to the access course for entrance into the University of Ghana. This study sought to find out how the e-learning experiences of adult learners differed across gender as they studied English language, Logic and Mathematics online. From a quantitative analysis of the data, the online experience of students with regard to Mathematics learning did not differ along gender lines. Therefore, the experiences of males and females were similar. Though, there were differences across gender groups regarding Logic and English language experiences, those of Logic experience were much bigger, where males provided overall more positive ratings than females. Specifically, for Logic experience, instructors’ show of respect to students, understanding of the learning needs of students and effective communication were rated generally better among males than females. Going forward, Logic instructors should pay equal attention to both groups irrespective of their gender to identify their learning needs and support them accordingly. Furthermore, all the instructors irrespective of their course could continue to improve their delivery of the courses as well as their relationships with the students in order to enhance future experience of the students.
Josée Lachance, Jean-François Desbiens
Journal of Adult and Continuing Education; https://doi.org/10.1177/14779714211021429

Abstract:
This article presents a research conducted with six French physicians who have been trained in complementary and alternative medicines. The perceived effects of this body-mind training, i.e. Awakening the Sensible Being, are being addressed in the thesis. These Awakening the Sensible Being practices help develop a quality of presence to self and to others, which are desirable qualities for health care professionals. An investigation conducted using two types of interviews: comprehensive interview and explicitation interview. The two paths of analysis will be introduced, as well as the achieved results which are linked to the personal sphere of the participants. The participants reported having experienced some identity transformations which lead them to place more emphasis on their inner references rather than external ones. They also reported feeling more centered and healthier.
Abigail Armstrong Dallmann
Journal of Adult and Continuing Education; https://doi.org/10.1177/14779714211019046

Abstract:
The University Without Walls experiment on the University of Massachusetts, Amherst campus, began in 1971. The central animating concepts of the original experiment include the value of knowledge that is learned both within and without ‘the walls’ of the university. These various knowledge sources are integrated into the student’s individualized plan of study within an interdisciplinary analytic framework. This approach is described here as integrative interdisciplinary studies and its on-going strength as an approach to adult learning is in the synergy of these approaches. An integrative interdisciplinary approach supports transformative learning within a context-specific understanding of knowledge.
Patty Witkowsky, Nicole Ferguson
Journal of Adult and Continuing Education; https://doi.org/10.1177/14779714211006716

Abstract:
The value of lifelong learning and alterations in course delivery modes and programme structures of graduate education to include evening and weekend coursework have increased the presence of multiple generations in educational settings ( Sánchez & Kaplan, 2014 ). In a number of fields, such as business and public administration, age diversity in graduate education is common. Historically, for student affairs preparation programmes (SAPPs), however, age diversity was still not consistently seen across programmes. However, as age diversity increases in SAPPs as programmes restructure to appeal to students with a variety of life experiences, opportunities to embrace intergenerational learning become available. This qualitative study explored the experiences of 13 post-traditional master’s degree students in SAPPs across the U.S. to understand their experiences in a multigenerational academic programme and how they navigate generational difference. Three themes emerged: honouring lived experiences in the educational experience, generational differences in understanding diversity and social interactions across generations in a community of learners. Recommendations for SAPP faculty to negotiate generational differences in learning spaces are provided.
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