it - Information Technology

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ISSN / EISSN : 1611-2776 / 2196-7032
Published by: Walter de Gruyter GmbH (10.1515)
Total articles ≅ 3,661
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Latest articles in this journal

, Michael Sedlmair, Falk Schreiber
Published: 6 September 2022
it - Information Technology; https://doi.org/10.1515/itit-2022-0037

Abstract:
Immersive Analytics is concerned with the systematic examination of the benefits and challenges of using immersive environments for data analysis, and the development of corresponding designs that improve the quality and efficiency of the analysis process. While immersive technologies are now broadly available, practical solutions haven’t received broad acceptance in real-world applications outside of several core areas, and proper guidelines on the design of such solutions are still under development. Both fundamental research and applications bring together topics and questions from several fields, and open a wide range of directions regarding underlying theory, evidence from user studies, and practical solutions tailored towards the requirements of application areas. We give an overview on the concepts, topics, research questions, and challenges.
, Sebastian Hubenschmid, Priscilla Balestrucci, Tiare Feuchtner, Sven Mayer, Marc O. Ernst, Albrecht Schmidt, Harald Reiterer
Published: 3 September 2022
it - Information Technology; https://doi.org/10.1515/itit-2022-0031

Abstract:
With increasing complexity in visual computing tasks, a single device may not be sufficient to adequately support the user’s workflow. Here, we can employ multi-device ecologies such as cross-device interaction, where a workflow can be split across multiple devices, each dedicated to a specific role. But what makes these multi-device ecologies compelling? Based on insights from our research, each device or interface component must contribute a complementary characteristic to increase the quality of interaction and further support users in their current activity. We establish the term complementary interfaces for such meaningful combinations of devices and modalities and provide an initial set of challenges. In addition, we demonstrate the value of complementarity with examples from within our own research.
, Peter Houska, Stefan Lengauer, Jessica Haring, Elisabeth Trinkl, Reinhold Preiner
Published: 2 September 2022
it - Information Technology; https://doi.org/10.1515/itit-2022-0006

Abstract:
Rapid progress in digitisation and computer techniques have enabled noteworthy new pottery analysis applications in recent decades. We focus on analytical techniques directed specifically at archaeological pottery research in this survey and review the specific benefits these have brought in the field. We consider techniques based on heterogeneous sources such as drawings, photographs, 3D scans and CT volume data. The various approaches and methods are structured according to the main steps in pottery processing in archaeology: documentation, classification and retrieval. Within these categories we review the most relevant papers and identify their advantages and limitations. We evaluate both freely and commercially available analysis tools and databases. Finally, we discuss open problems and future challenges in the field of pottery analysis.
, Peter Houska, Reinhold Preiner, Elisabeth Trinkl, Stephan Karl, Ivan Sipiran, Benjamin Bustos, Tobias Schreck
Published: 31 August 2022
it - Information Technology; https://doi.org/10.1515/itit-2022-0007

Abstract:
In Greek art, the phase from 900 to 700 BCE is referred to as the Geometric period due to the characteristically simple geometry-like ornamentations appearing on painted pottery surfaces during this era. Distinctive geometric patterns are typical for specific periods, regions, workshops as well as painters and are an important cue for archaeological tasks, such as dating and attribution. To date, these analyses are mostly conducted with the support of information technology. The primitives of an artefact’s ornamentation can be generally classified into a set of distinguishable pattern classes, which also appear in a similar fashion on other objects. Although a taxonomy of known pattern classes is given in subject-specific publications, the automatic detection and classification of surface patterns from object depictions poses a non-trivial challenge. Our long-term goal is to provide this classification functionality using a specifically designed and trained neural network. This, however, requires a large amount of labelled training data, which at this point does not exist for this domain context. In this work, we propose an effective annotation system, which allows a domain expert to interactively segment and label parts of digitized vessel surfaces. These user inputs are constantly fed back to a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN), enabling the prediction of pattern classes for a given surface area with ever increasing precision. Our work paves the way for a fully automatic classification and analysis of large surface pattern collections, which, with the help of suitable visual analysis techniques, can answer research questions like pattern variability or change over time. While the capability of our proposed annotation pipeline is demonstrated at the example of two characteristic Greek pottery artefacts from the Geometric period, the proposed methods can be readily adopted for the patternation in any other chronological periods as well as for stamped motifs.
, Johannes Zagermann, Jakob Karolus, Nils Rodrigues, Priscilla Balestrucci, Daniel Weiskopf, Benedikt Ehinger, Tiare Feuchtner, Harald Reiterer, Lewis L. Chuang, et al.
Published: 31 August 2022
it - Information Technology; https://doi.org/10.1515/itit-2022-0035

Abstract:
Adaptive visualization and interfaces pervade our everyday tasks to improve interaction from the point of view of user performance and experience. This approach allows using several user inputs, whether physiological, behavioral, qualitative, or multimodal combinations, to enhance the interaction. Due to the multitude of approaches, we outline the current research trends of inputs used to adapt visualizations and user interfaces. Moreover, we discuss methodological approaches used in mixed reality, physiological computing, visual analytics, and proficiency-aware systems. With this work, we provide an overview of the current research in adaptive systems.
, Christoph Schulz, Cedric Beschle, Hannah Booth, Miriam Butt, Andrea Barth, Oliver Deussen, Daniel Weiskopf
Published: 1 August 2022
it - Information Technology, Volume 64, pp 121-132; https://doi.org/10.1515/itit-2022-0033

Abstract:
This paper provides a brief overview of uncertainty visualization along with some fundamental considerations on uncertainty propagation and modeling. Starting from the visualization pipeline, we discuss how the different stages along this pipeline can be affected by uncertainty and how they can deal with this and propagate uncertainty information to subsequent processing steps. We illustrate recent advances in the field with a number of examples from a wide range of applications: uncertainty visualization of hierarchical data, multivariate time series, stochastic partial differential equations, and data from linguistic annotation.
, Frederik L. Dennig, Daniel A. Keim, Michael Sedlmair
Published: 1 August 2022
it - Information Technology, Volume 64, pp 169-180; https://doi.org/10.1515/itit-2022-0034

Abstract:
In this article, we discuss how Visualization (VIS) with Machine Learning (ML) could mutually benefit from each other. We do so through the lens of our own experience working at this intersection for the last decade. Particularly we focus on describing how VIS supports explaining ML models and aids ML-based Dimensionality Reduction techniques in solving tasks such as parameter space analysis. In the other direction, we discuss approaches showing how ML helps improve VIS, such as applying ML-based automation to improve visualization design. Based on the examples and our own perspective, we describe a number of open research challenges that we frequently encountered in our endeavors to combine ML and VIS.
Ying Zhang, , Oliver Deussen, Theodor Gutschlag, Sabine Storandt
Published: 1 August 2022
it - Information Technology, Volume 64, pp 181-191; https://doi.org/10.1515/itit-2022-0036

Abstract:
The analysis of movement trajectories plays a central role in many application areas, such as traffic management, sports analysis, and collective behavior research, where large and complex trajectory data sets are routinely collected these days. While automated analysis methods are available to extract characteristics of trajectories such as statistics on the geometry, movement patterns, and locations that might be associated with important events, human inspection is still required to interpret the results, derive parameters for the analysis, compare trajectories and patterns, and to further interpret the impact factors that influence trajectory shapes and their underlying movement processes. Every step in the acquisition and analysis pipeline might introduce artifacts or alterate trajectory features, which might bias the human interpretation or confound the automated analysis. Thus, visualization methods as well as the visualizations themselves need to take into account the corresponding factors in order to allow sound interpretation without adding or removing important trajectory features or putting a large strain on the analyst. In this paper, we provide an overview of the challenges arising in robust trajectory visualization tasks. We then discuss several methods that contribute to improved visualizations. In particular, we present practical algorithms for simplifying trajectory sets that take semantic and uncertainty information directly into account. Furthermore, we describe a complementary approach that allows to visualize the uncertainty along with the trajectories.
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