Vetus Testamentum

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 0042-4935 / 1568-5330
Published by: Brill Academic Publishers (10.1163)
Total articles ≅ 7,320
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Latest articles in this journal

Giuseppina Lenzo, Christophe Nihan
Published: 30 July 2021
Vetus Testamentum, Volume -1, pp 1-11; https://doi.org/10.1163/15685330-bja10052

Abstract:
This note provides a detailed criticism of the etymology relating the divine name or title ṣĕbā’ôt in Hebrew with Egyptian ḏbȝt/ḏbȝty, as initially proposed by M. Görg and S. Kreuzer.
Jürg Hutzli
Published: 30 July 2021
Vetus Testamentum, Volume -1, pp 1-23; https://doi.org/10.1163/15685330-bja10054

Abstract:
This article deals with two theological paradoxes in the Book of Esther (Masoretic Text). Arguably, the most striking characteristic of the book is that it does not mention God. At the same time, the two Jewish protagonists bear names that are identical with, or at least strongly reminiscent of, those of the Babylonian deities Marduk and Ištar. While the author of Esther seems to completely ignore the cultic laws of the Pentateuch, at the end of the book he strongly emphasizes the foundation of the Purim feast. Although each of these four topics has been dealt with in scholarship, they are seldomly—and if so, only partly—investigated with regard to their mutual coherence. In aiming to do this, the present article undertakes to reevaluate the theological profile of the Book of Esther (as expressed in the Masoretic Text) as well as its historical location. As for the latter question, the intriguing statement related to “relief and deliverance coming to the Jews from another place” in Est 4:14 provides an important hint.
, Michael Pietsch
Published: 30 July 2021
Vetus Testamentum, Volume -1, pp 1-17; https://doi.org/10.1163/15685330-bja10051

Abstract:
The historical King Solomon has been discussed and debated by many scholars over the years. It is interesting, however, to see that the historicity of the city list of Hazor, Megiddo, and Gezer has been accepted by traditional and more radical scholars alike, who have suggested historical contexts in the 10th, 9th, or 8th century BCE for it. In this article we examine the list from a primarily literary point of view, placing it in the broader context of royal ideology in the ancient Near East and arguing that it may preserve memories of great cities from the Canaanite era.
Jaime A. Myers
Published: 30 July 2021
Vetus Testamentum, Volume -1, pp 1-20; https://doi.org/10.1163/15685330-bja10050

Abstract:
Scholars have struggled to reach consensus about the literary relationship between the anti-Elide material in 1 Sam 2–3 and the so-called “Ark Narrative” in 1 Sam 4–6. I propose a new resolution to this problem. I argue that the two named characters, Hophni and Phinehas, have been introduced secondarily to and independently from the unnamed “sons of Eli” and represent a redactional layer that runs through chs. 1–2, and 4. Before the addition of these characters, the “sons of Eli” designated a generic priesthood associated with the character, Eli. The material about this priesthood is comprised of discrete passages that have been appended to Samuel’s birth story and its extension. The anti-Elide material was later connected to 1 Sam 4 through the addition of Hophni and Phinehas, who serve to recast the Elides’ iniquities as the reason for the Israelite defeat and loss of the ark.
Published: 30 July 2021
Vetus Testamentum, Volume -1, pp 1-20; https://doi.org/10.1163/15685330-bja10053

Abstract:
Recent research results have substantially broadened our knowledge regarding existing translations of the Hebrew Bible into Karaim. In the past few years numerous Biblical texts have been discovered that are among the oldest texts written in this moribund language. In this paper, the author presents the oldest known Karaim texts as well as recently discovered Karaim translations of the entire Tanakh and attempts to draw some preliminary conclusions on the relationship between them. Namely, the textual and stylistic similarities between Biblical manuscripts created separately in Karaim communities located far from one another in the regions of Crimea, Lithuania, Volhynia, and Galicia (including a considerable number of shared errores significativi) highlight the close affinities between these manuscripts and suggest that a common tradition of Bible translation must have existed among the Karaims. Moreover, the textual complexity and the use of sophisticated translation techniques and literary methods in the oldest known texts suggest that they could have been based on older texts or on a well-established oral translating tradition.
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