Journal of Agricultural Economics

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 0021-857X / 1477-9552
Published by: Wiley-Blackwell (10.1111)
Total articles ≅ 2,919
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, Stefan Hirsch
Journal of Agricultural Economics; https://doi.org/10.1111/1477-9552.12460

Abstract:
The dairy processing industry is the largest subsector in the EU food industry and is characterised by high concentration. We investigate the extent of output market power exerted in EU dairy processing, applying an advanced stochastic frontier approach to estimate firm-level markups of price over marginal cost using data for France, Italy and Spain from 2008 to 2017. We further relate markups to firm characteristics to identify what type of dairy processors possess the highest power in the sector. Our findings only reveal small average deviations from perfect competition but we find considerable heterogeneity of markups within and between the three countries. We identify a strong positive relationship between markup and profitability, though we find firm size and markups to be inversely related. This indicates that small firms operating in differentiated niche markets are able to charge higher markups, thereby ensuring their profitability. This result can serve EU dairy processors for future strategic alignment, and is particularly interesting from a policy perspective as large firms are mostly blamed in the exercise of market power in public and policy debates.
Petr Mariel,
Journal of Agricultural Economics; https://doi.org/10.1111/1477-9552.12456

Abstract:
Many stated preference studies have shown that individuals’ attitudes play an important role in explaining their behaviour and helping to disentangle preference heterogeneity. When responses to attitudinal questions are introduced into discrete choice models, a suitable approach that corrects for potential endogeneity must be adopted. We use a discrete choice experiment to analyse the preferences of residents regarding the use of agri-environmental practices in the peri-urban area of Milan (Italy). A detailed analysis of these preferences is relevant for policymakers as farmers on the peri-urban fringe are often asked to provide environmental services to urban-dwellers. We apply a latent class model that we extend to include indicators of individuals’ attitudes towards the relationship between agriculture and the environment. Besides the application of the control function approach to deal with endogeneity, our main contribution is the use of a refutability test to check the exogeneity of the instruments in the agri-environmental setting. Our results show that attitudinal indicators help to disentangle the preference heterogeneity and that the respondents’ willingness-to-pay distribution differs according to the indicators’ values.
, Maria Gerster‐Bentaya, Andrea Knierim
Journal of Agricultural Economics; https://doi.org/10.1111/1477-9552.12457

Abstract:
To achieve social sustainability, there is a need to incorporate social metrics of farmers’ well-being into agricultural monitoring systems. We contribute to the operationalisation of the measurement of farmers’ well-being by determining how farm-level factors influence farmers’ satisfaction with their work and quality of life. Using a data sample of 1099 farms that are part of the Farm Accountancy Data Network (FADN) in nine European countries, we tested a set of hypotheses related to work satisfaction and life quality perception based on a structural equation model. Satisfaction with on-farm work has a significant and substantial influence on satisfaction with quality of life. Farm-level aspects, such as working time, age of assets, financial situation of the farm and community engagement, significantly influenced farmers’ satisfaction with farming, but their joint effect explained less than one-fifth of the satisfaction. The results suggest that agricultural information systems intended to monitor and compare sustainability progress on farms would benefit from the integration of a metric measuring social concerns from the farmers’ point of view.
, Daniel P. Scheitrum, Steven van Winden
Journal of Agricultural Economics; https://doi.org/10.1111/1477-9552.12459

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Phoo Pye Zone, Nang Lun Kham Synt, A. Myint Zu, Yulu Tang, Bart Minten
Journal of Agricultural Economics; https://doi.org/10.1111/1477-9552.12461

Abstract:
Rice is the staple food for about half of the world's population and mills are the essential processing link between farmers and consumers, making rice milling one of the most important agro-processing sectors globally. This paper assesses changes in rice and paddy prices, and processing margins during the COVID-19 pandemic shock through the lens of rice mills in Myanmar. Our data, collected through telephone surveys with a large number of medium- and large-scale rice millers in September 2020, reveal significant disruptions from the COVID-19 pandemic, including transportation restrictions, employee lay-offs, and reduced operations relative to normal times. However, milling margins, and paddy and rice prices were mostly stable, showing only minor increases compared to 2019. Rice prices increased most for the varieties linked to export markets, though the gains were mostly passed through to farmers as higher paddy prices. Similarly, higher rice prices achieved by modern mills—due to extra processing—were mostly transmitted to producers. Our results also highlight the major importance of byproducts—broken rice and rice bran—sales to overall milling margins as byproduct sales allowed mill operators to sustain negative paddy-to-rice margins.
, Frank Scrimgeour
Published: 22 September 2021
Journal of Agricultural Economics; https://doi.org/10.1111/1477-9552.12458

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Mathews Matimelo
Published: 7 September 2021
Journal of Agricultural Economics; https://doi.org/10.1111/1477-9552.12455

Abstract:
Given the recognised role of blanket extension advice in the low uptake of productivity-enhancing technologies among developing country farmers, personalised or site-specific extension approaches are gaining attention. Focusing on the case of the plant clinic extension model which provides personalised crop protection services to smallholder farmers, we investigate to what extent and how accurately farmers adopt personalised extension advice, and the implications for agricultural productivity. We combine a unique database of personalised integrated pest management (IPM) recommendations provided to 420 plant clinic attendees in Zambia with survey data on the actual IPM practices implemented by these same clinic attendees. We find that more than 80% of the sample farmers deviated from the personalised IPM recommendations they received from plant clinics. Based on the degree of deviation from the personalised recommendations, we identify five categories of adopters of IPM practices and show their heterogeneous effects on maize productivity. For example, our multi-valued treatment effect estimates suggest an 82% yield penalty for non-adopters compared to full adopters of recommended IPM practices, while the yield gain for full adopters is more than double that of partial adopters, as well as that of those who adopted additional practices beyond what was recommended. Our findings have important implications for the promotion of personalised extension services and for the measurement of the impact of complex agricultural technologies.
, Sayed Iftekhar, James Fogarty, Steven Schilizzi
Journal of Agricultural Economics, Volume 72, pp 931-948; https://doi.org/10.1111/1477-9552.12442

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
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