Journal of the Association for the Study of Food and Society

Journal Information
ISSN : 2331-4184
Published by: Bloomsbury Academic (10.2752)
Total articles ≅ 8
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Articles in this journal

Lorraine Handler Sirota, Jacqueline M. Newman, Xiaoying M. Lei
Journal of the Association for the Study of Food and Society, Volume 1, pp 31-40; https://doi.org/10.2752/152897996786623363

Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to assess changes in food behaviors of a Chinese population by investigating a group of 32 mature students before and after they came to study in the United States. Using a modified version of the National Cancer Institute's Health Habits and History Questionnaire, data was collected to measure food acculturation, food behaviors, and frequency of consumption for more than one hundred foods. Results show considerable dietary change. Food intake decreased significantly in the “Bread and cereal” food group and in the “Vegetable” food group in the United States compared to intake in China. In contrast, foods in the “Fruit,” “Meat,” and “Dairy products” food groups increased significantly in the United States compared to in China. Intake of many individual items increased significantly including snacks and sweets, ice-cream, whole milk, non-dairy creamers, orange juice, white bread, and soda. The most significant decrease was in the consumption of rice. Other food behaviors changed including respondents gaining weight and their shopping shifting from Chinese/Oriental markets to American/Westernized markets the longer they were in the United States. Professionals would be wise to monitor these changes because the consequences of dietary change affect health and well-being.
Jacqueline M. Newman
Journal of the Association for the Study of Food and Society, Volume 1, pp 9-10; https://doi.org/10.2752/152897996786623372

Elizabeth Colavito, Joanne F. Guthrie, Elizabeth Colavito Colavito is currently affiliated with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health Bureau of Family and Community Health Boston MA, Joanne F. Guthrie Guthrie is affiliated with U.S. Department of Agriculture Washington D.C.
Journal of the Association for the Study of Food and Society, Volume 1, pp 13-22; https://doi.org/10.2752/152897996786623417

Abstract:
Research studies employing major theories of behavior change, such as the Health Belief Model, Rogers' Model of Diffusion of Innovation, and other theories, have added to our understanding of the relationship of knowledge and attitudes to food-related behavior. Unfortunately, many of the studies that employed these models have used small, local samples, limiting the generalizability of their findings. The new Diet and Health Knowledge Survey (DHKS), conducted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, provides nationally-collected data on knowledge and attitudes concerning diet and health. Linked to dietary data collected from those individuals as a part of USDA's Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals, the DHKS data can be used to examine relationships between knowledge, attitudes, and food-related behavior, as postulated by behavior change theories, in a large, diverse, national sample of individuals. This article describes the DHKS, discusses its strengths and limitations as a data source for research studies based on major theories of behavior change, and provides some examples of theory-based studies of food-related behavior that could be conducted using DHKS data.
Marie Powers
Journal of the Association for the Study of Food and Society, Volume 1, pp 11-12; https://doi.org/10.2752/152897996786623354

Virginia Davis Floyd
Journal of the Association for the Study of Food and Society, Volume 1, pp 5-8; https://doi.org/10.2752/152897996786623408

Jacqueline M. Newman
Journal of the Association for the Study of Food and Society, Volume 1, pp 4-4; https://doi.org/10.2752/152897996786623390

Sara Weaver Weaver is affiliated with University of Texas Austin TX., Karen S. Kubena Kubena is affiliated with Human Nutrition Section Dept of Animal Science Texas AM.
Journal of the Association for the Study of Food and Society, Volume 1, pp 23-30; https://doi.org/10.2752/152897996786623426

Abstract:
The objectives of this study were to identify the degree to which dietary intakes of college students met current dietary recommendations and to assess relationships between knowledge of food composition or attitudes toward diet and nutrition and dietary intake. A three-part questionnaire with six days of food records was administered to undergraduates over a 12-week period to obtain background information, as well as data on knowledge, and attitudes toward nutrition and health. To determine dietary adequacy, dietary intake was compared to 1989 recommendations from the National Research Council (NRC). A high proportion reported modifying their diets during the previous year to decrease fat, increase fiber, etc., indicating interest in nutrition. However, only 15% of males (n=73) and less than 30% of females (n=76) achieved NRC recommended levels of dietary fat and saturated fat while only 13% of females had enough calcium. Other nutrients which were of concern included the antioxidants, vitamins A, C, and E. Principal component factor analysis and correlation coefficients were utilized to identify underlying patterns of knowledge and attitudes and assess the relationship between those patterns and dietary intake, respectively. Lower intakes of dietary fat and saturated fat were noted by those with favorable attitudes towards a nutritious diet, vegetarianism, and avoidance of excess energy and fat intake as well as those with more knowledge of energy and fat content of foods. Education to enhance positive attitudes toward diet and health and improve knowledge of food composition could improve dietary intake, especially with regard to fat.
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