Journal of Construction Engineering and Management

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ISSN / EISSN : 0733-9364 / 1943-7862
Total articles ≅ 4,274
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Amer A. Hijazi, , , Ali Alashwal
Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, Volume 147; https://doi.org/10.1061/(asce)co.1943-7862.0002142

Abstract:
Building information modeling (BIM) plays a critical role in the integration of different parties by acting as a centralized database defining their responsibilities and contractual obligations. However, resolution of conflicts among stakeholders remains a shortcoming of BIM. Blockchain is on a path to disrupt many aspects of businesses that deal with the coordination of information and trust to enable a single source of truth model with multiple control entities. The purpose of this study is to analyze construction supply chain (CSC) data delivery challenges to provide a rationale for the integration of BIM and blockchain enabling a reliable digital deliverable (RDD) for operation. Three systematic reviews and a focus group discussion are used in this study. This is the first study to develop a compelling rationale systematically for the integration of BIM and blockchain and propose an RDD model, paving the way for a single source of truth system. The study enables blockchain to be set in context of both theoretical value transfer and its practical application for CSC data delivery in the form of BIM.
, M. M. Casanovas-Rubio, , A. de la Fuente
Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, Volume 147; https://doi.org/10.1061/(asce)co.1943-7862.0002073

Abstract:
Currently, foundation piles for inhabited areas are often constructed using a continuous flight auger, which is a cost- and time-efficient technology that does not require stabilization of the borehole wall; the steel bar reinforcement is embedded after the concrete has been poured. However, this reinforcement operation can lead to severe construction and structural issues. Thus, several improvements to this technology have been proposed since its first application in the 20th century, such as the use of more fluid concretes. Nevertheless, steel and polymers are emerging as a potential replacement for steel bars in concrete reinforcement for several types of structures and building components, with identified and quantified benefits from a sustainability perspective. Accordingly, this paper proposes and validates a multicriteria decision-making approach designed with multidisciplinary experts within the construction field to assess the sustainability index of concrete pile foundations. The results of a case study enable us to conclude that polymeric fiber-reinforced concrete piles are the most sustainable due to their cost–structural efficiency ratio, high durability, and minimal risks during construction. Steel fiber-reinforced concrete alternatives were also found to be more sustainable than traditional reinforced concrete. Nonetheless, these results are unrepresentative of the current practice as direct costs were found to be the main driver in the decision-making processes, while other costs and both environmental and social indicators are disregarded. This justifies the urgency to provide sustainability-driven decision-making approaches capable of objectively quantifying the satisfaction degree of economic, environmental, and social indicators involved in the analysis.
Hooman Sadeh, Claudio Mirarchi, Alberto Pavan
Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, Volume 147; https://doi.org/10.1061/(asce)co.1943-7862.0002140

Abstract:
Managing risk in construction projects has proven to be a challenge for many project managers and stakeholders involved in projects. The lack of a systematic approach and standardized processes are key factors influencing improper risk management techniques. This research introduces a new model to evaluate and assess risk in terms of cost impact, utilizing a fuzzy Monte Carlo simulation approach for the first time. The method consists of ranking the top risks using a fuzzy logic system utilized in an objective manner by setting criteria for experts to rank the risk based on cost impact and probability to reduce human biases, then evaluating their cost impact through a Monte Carlo simulation both pre- and postmitigation. This work proposes a new strategy to elicit risk for construction projects based on risk cost impact, project type, project location, project contract type, and project delivery method. Based on the findings, implementation of a risk mitigation response plan can decrease the project cost remarkably. This model proved to be beneficial in forecasting risk impact when executed on a commercial construction project in California. This model can be applied as a general tool for risk mitigation processes for the construction industry.
, Helen Lingard, Nick Blismas
Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, Volume 147; https://doi.org/10.1061/(asce)co.1943-7862.0002136

Abstract:
Effective interaction between project participants is essential in achieving a high-quality design. Through interaction, information is disseminated in project teams and the required knowledge becomes accessible during decision-making episodes. Consequently, effective interaction contributes to improved design outcomes and enhanced project efficiency leading to a higher chance of project success. Although interactions have been studied in the past, such studies predominantly focused on interaction patterns only, thus ignoring the decision-making context, participants’ involvement, and the interdependencies between decisions. This paper makes a methodological contribution to the body of knowledge by proposing a sociotechnical framework. The framework enables the simultaneous investigation of decision interdependencies, the patterns of social interactions that address design knowledge requirements, and participants’ involvement in and influence on making decisions. To demonstrate its efficacy, the framework was applied in a case study. The evidence suggests that design decisions with positive constructability outcomes could be achieved through an alignment between the information interdependencies of design decisions and the interaction patterns that underpin them. Involvement of participants with relevant knowledge and expertise and collaborative information exchanges between participants facilitated this alignment. The framework can be used in different project settings to analyze the theoretical mechanisms that characterize effective interaction in the context of design decision-making.
, Hota GangaRao
Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, Volume 147; https://doi.org/10.1061/(asce)co.1943-7862.0002139

Abstract:
Rockfalls can have devastating consequences to motorists and road facilities. Over time, countermeasures have been considered technically viable to mitigate these events. Rockfall hazard assessment is one of the options to identify feasible countermeasures, including designs, based on engineering-related data analysis. Of the attempts to enhance the fundamentals and practices of efficient and reliable rockfall hazard assessment, a few of the past contributions were devoted to developing holistic approaches that can identify the best design option by prioritizing technically viable countermeasures. These measures are based on multidimensional aspects such as construction cost and time, complexity, safety, and aesthetics. This paper presents a novel holistic prioritization framework to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of feasible design options for rockfall countermeasures, focusing on rural local road rockfall applications. The framework is composed of three main steps, including rockfall hazard assessment, prioritization, and sensitivity analysis. The processes of the proposed framework are well-demonstrated in this paper through an actual case study in West Virginia. The unique feature of the framework lies in a sensitivity analysis that provides decision-makers with a statistical inference of the confidence level in choosing the top-ranked design option. This paper also presents a synthesis of the evaluation criteria necessary to prioritize the countermeasure design options identified through a rockfall hazard assessment. Herein, the applicability of the sensitivity analysis approach was further expanded to quantitative measures obtained through standard scaling techniques.
, Jeonghwan Kim, Soohyun Park, Soomin Lee, Jongwon Seo
Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, Volume 147; https://doi.org/10.1061/(asce)co.1943-7862.0002137

Abstract:
Building information modeling (BIM) can facilitate effective three-dimensional (3D) earthwork modeling by furnishing insightful information. An earthwork area is generally represented in a cell-based environment for planning purposes such as allocation plans or equipment plans. However, previous studies utilized conventional methods, which are tedious and time-consuming, to create cell-based representations. Therefore, a method that can be applied to automatically represent earthwork BIM models in a cell-based environment should be developed. To address that research gap, this paper proposes a novel method to develop voxel-based representations of earthwork models. The voxel-based method is parametric, and the size, number, and properties of the voxels can be easily varied. This method, validated for accuracy, rapidly creates a parametric voxel model linked with geotechnical information necessary for earthwork operations. A visual programming tool, Grasshopper, is used to develop an algorithm that can automatically divide the earthwork model into voxels. Finally, experiments are conducted to validate the proposed method using an actual earthwork BIM design. The paper contributes to the existing body of knowledge by proposing a voxel-based earthwork representation and algorithm that automatically create a cell-based 3D environment that is flexible enough to integrate geotechnical parameters. The results indicate that the proposed method will help project engineers, planners, and managers create an optimal-size voxel-based earthwork model with customized geotechnical information.
Chau Le, , Ivan Damnjanovic
Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, Volume 147; https://doi.org/10.1061/(asce)co.1943-7862.0002143

Abstract:
Determining a reasonable project duration is one of the most critical activities required by project owner agencies for successful project letting and delivery. Most owner agencies, specifically in the highway sector, mainly rely on schedulers’ judgment and experience in determining the sequence of construction activities to estimate the required amount of time of a project. A vast amount of historical project performance data available in owner agencies’ databases provide rich and reliable resources that can significantly improve the current process to produce a consistent and repeatable quality of construction logic determination. This study proposes a novel data-driven process model utilizing pattern mining, statistical analysis, and network analysis techniques that can detect pairwise logical relationships among construction activities (e.g., Start-Start and Finish-Start) and develop knowledge networks of as-built construction sequence patterns to improve the scheduling process. Three algorithms are proposed to apply the knowledge networks to sequencing a new project: finding immediate predecessors and successors of an activity or ordering a given set of activities. Ten years of historical project data obtained from a state department of transportation were used in this research. A case study reveals that the process model developed in this study can successfully build the most reasonable construction sequences of a highway project, which can significantly improve the scheduling and contract time determination process.
Jaehong Kim, Yongwei Shan, Sohee Kim, Dongwoo Song, Haejun Park, Changhoon Bang
Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, Volume 147; https://doi.org/10.1061/(asce)co.1943-7862.0002144

Abstract:
Fire safety on building construction sites as an important part of on-site safety management has rarely been studied for construction sites. To fill the knowledge gap, this research was conducted to identify important influencing factors on fire safety on construction sites, as well as their relationships, through a questionnaire administered to 1,492 fire officers in South Korea. The authors divided the questions into three factors (building, fire, and human) to distinguish factors affecting construction site fire safety. For the majority of the factors, there was high agreement on the importance level of factors affecting fire safety during construction between administrative and field firefighters. However, perception disparity did exist. The authors identified the interrelationships between factors through path analysis and structural equation modeling. The paths of factors showed the highest direct relation between building and fire factors, and the human factor played a mediator role between human and fire factors. The study contributes to the overall body of knowledge by providing officers’ insights into the factors contributing to fire safety on construction sites, as well as the quantification of the interrelationship among the factors, which will serve as the basis to develop effective safety measures, such as policies and regulations at both the project level and industry level, to address fire safety on construction sites. The SEM model developed in this study can also be used as a base model for future related studies.
Jaeyoon Kim, Mirsalar Kamari, Seulbi Lee,
Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, Volume 147; https://doi.org/10.1061/(asce)co.1943-7862.0002153

Abstract:
Inspecting and assessing existing utility poles has become increasingly important for reducing the vulnerability of power distribution infrastructure systems in disaster situations, which can enhance community resilience. Although vision-based systems have been applied to detect faults in power distribution infrastructures, little research currently exists on assessing component- and network-level failures of utility poles based on their geometric and environmental information. This paper aims to propose a new data-driven approach to support risk-informed decision-making for utility maintenance under extreme wind conditions. Large-scale open-source imagery from Google Street View is used to assess geometric properties of utility poles (i.e., leaning angle). Then the failure probability of utility poles is analyzed under varying conditions (e.g., age, leaning angle, and wind loads) in a three-dimensional virtual city model. The proposed method is tested through case studies in Texas to (1) validate an algorithm for estimating leaning angles of utility poles and (2) understand the progress of failures of leaning utility poles from a network perspective. The outcomes of the case studies demonstrate that the proposed method has the potential to leverage large-scale open-source visual data to assess the vulnerability of utility pole networks that may lead to cascading failures in power distribution infrastructure systems. Based on the proposed virtual environment, the method is expected to enable practitioners to facilitate risk-informed decision-making against disaster situations, which creates an opportunity for prioritizing maintenance tasks regarding power distribution infrastructures.
Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, Volume 147; https://doi.org/10.1061/(asce)co.1943-7862.0002148

Abstract:
Blockchain technology has been explored for governmental supervision of construction work (GSCW) due to its merits of traceability, immutability, and transparency. However, its decentralized nature is seemingly incompatible with GSCW, which is a type of centralized governance per se. This research aims to find a network topology with a proper level of (de)centralization and, based on this topology, to develop a blockchain-based model for GSCW. First, a literature review is conducted to identify problems in GSCW. Then, a cross-sectoral learning is performed between GSCW and digital currency electronic payment systems. Next, a design science research method is adopted to develop a dual-layer blockchain-based GSCW model integrated with an incentive mechanism. Finally, the model is illustrated in Hyperledger Fabric and its strengths and weaknesses evaluated. It was found that the model can enable an information-sharing, tamper-proof, and privacy-preserving mechanism without affecting the current status and routines of GSCW units and project teams. The model developed in our study can serve as a valuable reference for policymakers, practitioners, and researchers to develop governance policies or blockchain applications.
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