ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes

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Mohan Baruwal Chhetri, Xiao Liu, Marthie Grobler, Thuong Hoang, Karen Renaud, Jennifer McIntosh
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 47, pp 12-14; https://doi.org/10.1145/3520273.3520278

Abstract:
As the creators, designers, coders, testers, users, and occasional abusers of all software systems-including cyber security systems - humans should be at the centre of all design and development efforts. Despite this, most software engineering and cyber security research and practices tend to be function, data, or process oriented. In contrast, human-centric software engineering focuses on the human-centric issues critical to successful software systems' engineering. The aim of the International Workshop on Human Centric Software Engineering & Cyber Security (HCSE&CS) was to provide a venue for sharing research ideas and outcomes on enhanced theory, models, tools, and capability for next-generation human-centric software engineering and cyber security. The Second HCSE&CS Workshop was held on 15 November 2021 in conjunction with ASE 2021, the 36th IEEE/ACM International Conference on Automated Software Engineering. It was originally intended to be held in Melbourne, Australia but was instead held virtually due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This post-workshop report provides an overview of the aims and motivation of the workshop as well as a summary of the presentations and discussions that took place during the workshop.
Alex Groce
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 47, pp 3-3; https://doi.org/10.1145/3520273.3520274

Abstract:
Charles Babbage's On the Economy of Machinery and Manufactures is good enough that it makes us regret that the great Babbage is not around to turn his eye to the modern software industry at large, or perhaps to open source development (Eghbal's Working in Public is a good book, but another such would not do anyone any harm).
Kendra M. L. Cooper, Fabio Petrillo, Yann-Gaël Guéhéneuc, Cristiano Politowski
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 47, pp 10-11; https://doi.org/10.1145/3520273.3520277

Abstract:
The first edition of the workshop on Automated Software Engineering For Games (ASE4Games 2021) was held virtually on November 14th, 2021, co-located with the 36v IEEE/ACM International Conference on Automated Software Engineering (ASE 2021). Five papers from all over the world were submitted, two full-papers and two short-papers were accepted. The program also featured a keynote by Mathieu Nayrolles, researcher at Ubisoft, entitled Automated Software Engineering for AAA Games.
Sajid Anwar, Abdul Rauf, Muhammad Ramzan, Imran Razzak, Mehrdad Saadatmad
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 47, pp 15-16; https://doi.org/10.1145/3520273.3520279

Abstract:
Inherent strengths and capabilities in Natural Language Processing (NLP), such as topics modeling, content categorization, context extraction, sentiment analysis, and text-speech conversion, have helped in rapid growth. At the same time, this rapid growth has led to numerous challenges for software development engineers both on a technical and managerial level. NLP has changed the way we interact with computers, and it'll continue doing so in the future. These technologies, mainly based on artificial intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML), would be the underlying force for transformation from data-driven to intelligence-driven endeavors, as they shape and improve communication technology in the years to come. The literature and research communities are observing the same technological advancements in the domain of software engineering introduced by the use of NLP techniques in conjunction with Artificial Intelligence. Thus, the NLP-SEA (Software Engineering Automation: A Natural Language Perspective) series of workshops is a means to contribute to the advancement and furthering of knowledge in this direction. The focus of this workshop is to provide an opportunity for the researchers and practitioners in academia and industry to provide a diverse, but significant body of research contributions on every aspect related to the application of NLP in the automated software and system engineering domain.
Ahmed El-Deeb
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 47, pp 8-9; https://doi.org/10.1145/3520273.3520276

Abstract:
We can easily misunderstand the prevalence of software products packed with features over the years as an indicator to our success in impressing customers; thinking that we don't need to do something more than just keep shipping features one after another and keep up with competition. We'd better change that misconception before it's too late. The generation that created sustainable existence for some software products today will not be the same as the generations that would make the decision whether these products would continue to exist. For instance, Generation Z, those born mid-to-late 1990 up to early 2010, grew up with tech that they are no longer impressed by the mere notion of Feature. Their lives are so ingrained in utility from day one that software became something they experience rather than use. It is convenience, reliability, security, seamless interactions, performance, speed and all the matters that directly contribute to positive emotional, sensory, or cognitive perception are what's important. Additionally, it's no longer the app or the piece of software alone that matters; it's the entire Brand. This is because such generations have to be acquired before they even hold the product through brand image and maintained by evolving the brand by their ever changing needs. Such perception of the software product formulated by convenience characteristics and a supportive trustable brand is what constitute Customer Experience. In this paper, it is discussed the key elements that are needed by every software company in order to create an excellent Customer Experience to acquire and maintain happy customers.
Peter G. Neumann
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 47, pp 4-7; https://doi.org/10.1145/3520273.3520275

Abstract:
Edited by PGN (Risks Forum Moderator, with contribu- tions by others as indicated. Opinions are individual rather than organizational, with usual disclaimers implied. We ad- dress problems relating to software, hardware, people, and other circumstances relevant to computer systems. Ref- erences (R i j) to the online Risks Forum denote RISKS vol i number j. Cited RISKS items generally identify contributors and sources, together with URLs. Official RISKS archives are available at www.risks.org, with nice html formatting and search engine courtesy of Lindsay Mar- shall at Newcastle:; http://catless.ncl.ac.uk/Risks/i.j.html (also ftp://www.sri.com/risks). CACM Inside Risks: http://www.csl.sri.com/neumann/insiderisks.html
Ahmed El-Deeb
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 47, pp 10-11; https://doi.org/10.1145/3502771.3502775

Abstract:
"Software is eating the world." wrote Marc Andreessen in his groundbreaking article in Wall Street Journal published 2014. He was pointing out that global non-tech businesses will be relying on software to deliver the core of these businesses. Fast-forward to 2021 and think about the food delivery industry, how food delivery and kitchen management have become run by software and think about the entertainment business such as Netflix and Spotify. But as the software eats the world, the question whether it can digest that amount of digital transformation and businesscritical systems without the right supply of tech talents. Shortage of tech talent is not a new topic; however, this doesn't mean that the trajectory of the problem continues to be the same when we talked about this problem 5 years ago. What's alarming is the drivers behind the talent shortage dilemma. This paper discusses key recent people-centric topics behind the tech talent dilemma.
Gunel Jahangirova, Valerio Terragni
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 47, pp 25-25; https://doi.org/10.1145/3502771.3502780

Abstract:
Testing is an important activity in software engineering, especially with the growing adoption of software systems in safety-critical domains. Testing research, however, is mostly focused on deter- mining which test inputs to use (e.g., proposing and evaluating test coverage criteria or automatic test generation tools). Re- gardless of the used coverage criterion, we need to know whether a given program executes correctly on a given input. Indeed, a test execution for which we cannot discriminate between success or failure serves little purpose. This corresponds to the so-called øracle problem", the problem of knowing whether a program be- haves correctly for a speci c input. Although the importance of the oracle problem is well understood, only a few alternatives exist to manually deriving test oracles. This makes automated test or- acle generation one of the main bottlenecks for achieving full test automation. Therefore, novel approaches and tools are needed to address this important problem.
Cécile Péraire, Stephan Krusche
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 47, pp 18-21; https://doi.org/10.1145/3502771.3502778

Abstract:
The 3rd International Workshop on Software Engineering Education for the Next Generation was held remotely on May 24, 2021. The workshop was an integral component of the Joint Track on Software Engineering Education and Training at the 43rd International Conference on Software Engineering. It specifically supported the general theme of "Educating the Next Generation of Software Engineers". Building on its predecessors, the workshop used a highly interactive format, structured around eight short paper presentations to generate discussion topics, an activity to select the most interesting topics, and structured breakout sessions to allow participants to discuss those topics in detail. Participants presented the results of the breakout sessions using mind maps.
Alex Groce
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 47, pp 4-4; https://doi.org/10.1145/3502771.3502772

Abstract:
Nassim Nicholas Taleb's The Black Swan and Fooled by Randomness: The Hidden Role of Chance in Life and the Markets are favorite books of paranoid engineers of all varieties. Taleb's Antifragile: Things that Gain from Disorder is also rightly admired, but is just slightly too recent to fall within the Passages requirement that a book be at least ten years old before you can reasonably call it a classic.
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