Computers in Entertainment

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ISSN / EISSN : 1544-3574 / 1544-3574
Total articles ≅ 555
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Latest articles in this journal

, Per Anders Östblad
Computers in Entertainment, Volume 16, pp 1-16; https://doi.org/10.1145/3276321

Abstract:
Voice acting is common in computer games in many genres. The recording and processing of voice acting is a time-consuming process that involves, for instance, voice actors, directors, audio engineers, and game writers. Changes to the script of a game after the voice acting has been recorded are expensive. At the same time, playtests of games without voice acting may give different results than testing where it is present. This creates a situation where improvements identified from play testing are either ignored or leads to extensive re-recording of voice acting. This article presents a design science research project where text-to-speech (TTS) synthesis is used as a substitute for recorded voice acting in the early stages of game production. We propose a set of design principles that have been evaluated in a sharp game production. Our results indicate several benefits of using TTS as a prototyping tool: It can be a source of inspiration for game writers, it gives good estimations on timing and pacing of the game, and it allows for early tests of how the dialog will be perceived by players. The quality and characteristics of the voices provided by the TTS system play an important role in this process. The rapid development in the speech technology field opens many future possibilities.
Muralidhar Pantula, K. S. Kuppusamy
Computers in Entertainment, Volume 16, pp 1-13; https://doi.org/10.1145/3276323

Abstract:
With the ongoing prolific expansion of the size of the World Wide Web, the quantity of video content is also expanding. With this massive increase in size, users encounter a serious problem when trying to decide which videos to spend their time on. Moreover, as a result of our modern-day faster lifestyles, users wish to consume the contents of the video as quickly as possible. This article proposes a model, entitled Fast Captions , that enables users to consume the video more quickly with the help of closed captions. The proposed model incorporates a temporal summarization of the captions that helps in understanding the contents of the video more quickly. A prototype implementation of the proposed Fast Captioning model is developed with the Facilitas media player, which allows the user to select the playing speed and renders the video with summarized captions. The results of the experiments conducted with the implementation confirms the acceptance of the proposed Fast Captions model with an acceptance rate of 92%.
Daniel Valente De Macedo, ,
Computers in Entertainment, Volume 16, pp 1-18; https://doi.org/10.1145/3276324

Abstract:
The realistic representation of light within a computational domain is not a trivial task. Although several rendering approaches exist, the ray tracing technique is highly regarded as robust and realistic; however, its computational cost is still prohibitive for real-time games and other 3D applications. A modern tradeoff is to pair the ray tracing with the rasterization step, the former being responsible for generating complex lighting interactions, such as reflections, while the latter is used to generate less demanding visual effects, such as diffuse lighting and shadows. The stated framework has been studied by several authors, but it has not been shown to work both efficiently and accurately for highly dynamic scenes with deformable geometry. Stepping in this direction, this work presents a case study whose goal is to generate fast and realistic reflections on rigid and deformable body simulations using a hybrid approach that brings together the Screen Space technique with the GPU ray tracing algorithm and their respective main capabilities. The results show that not only realistic reflections can be generated at interactive rates, but also that the hybrid approach allows to achieve a certain level of scalability with respect to the number of triangles updated on every frame during the simulations.
, Hironori Mitake, Shoichi Hasgawa
Computers in Entertainment, Volume 16, pp 1-17; https://doi.org/10.1145/3277452

Abstract:
This study presents a novel interactive face makeup system that aims to support users to improve makeup creativity. In this system, facial feature points were tracked by Kinect and mapped to the 3D face model. The makeup tools were developed for providing a tangible interaction. A face painting application was developed based on the Unity 3D framework. While users apply makeup, the program will generate color on the model, which synchronizes with the user's movement. The results will be mapped to the user's face in real time by using a projection mapping technique that allows users to see which color is suitable for their skin tone. Users can perceive a realistic makeup feeling from our touch detectable makeup tools. Moreover, by using a computer-based drawing system, users can undo, save, and load their makeup image and compare with other styles. A subjective evaluation was conducted to evaluate the users’ satisfaction. The results indicated that by using this system, users can find a suitable makeup style for themselves and get help increasing their makeup creativity.
, Maurício M. S. Bernardes
Computers in Entertainment, Volume 16, pp 1-16; https://doi.org/10.1145/3276322

Abstract:
Recent years have witnessed independent game production rise to a prominent position in the digital game industry. Be it by the fresh, innovative take it brought to the scene or by its rebellious attitude towards what is perceived as mainstream, the term “indie game” has become somewhat of a buzzword. The following study displays a series of findings of research fieldwork aiming to advance the study of indie game development by investigating organizational and managerial practices commonly adopted by these developers. Relying on semi-structured interviews conducted with lead developers of seven Brazilian indie game firms, the connections, similarities, and differences among these developers’ firm structure and project management practices and those of the larger game industry is explored, utilizing the lenses of scope, organization, time, cost, and quality management as a starting point. Given the growing and significant relevance of the game industry as a whole, this empirical study offers pragmatic data on the still-niche research topic of indie games.
Jacques Barnard, ,
Computers in Entertainment, Volume 16, pp 1-47; https://doi.org/10.1145/3236492

Abstract:
Currently, there is a lack of systems development methodologies (SDMs) suitable for the development of location-based games. This research introduced a newly developed SDM to aid in the development process of location-based games, called the developmental methodology for location-based games (DMLBG). The DMLBG was based on SDMs most often used for developing mobile applications, as well as mobile and traditional games. Four case studies were used to test the DMLBG. During the case studies, independent games development teams used the DMLBG extensively to test the feasibility of the SDM. The results showed that the SDM did aid all four of the teams to successfully develop a location-based game. The teams documented the development process and gave critical feedback on their experiences. This feedback was used to revise and improve the SDM. The DMLBG addressed the lack of an SDM that is suitable for the development of location-based games.
Chen Shu-Hui, Wu Wann-Yih, Jason Dennison
Computers in Entertainment, Volume 16, pp 1-15; https://doi.org/10.1145/3238249

Abstract:
The development of a relevant model for measuring user enjoyment of video game play has received a great deal of attention in game-based and flow-based literature. EGameFlow, a self-report scale instrument created from the original game enjoyment framework proposed by Sweetser and Wyeth, provides a necessary and potentially useful tool for game enjoyment researchers. However, the scale itself is quite new. The utility of EGameFlow cannot be determined until its rigorousness has been verified. The purpose of this study was to test the validity, reliability, and applicability of EGameFlow for measuring players’ experiences in video game play. A total of 167 participants played an interactive video game and then evaluated their game playing experiences via the refined 27-item EGameFlow scale, which included the following seven dimensions: concentration, goal clarity, feedback, challenge, autonomy, immersion, and social interaction. Confirmatory factor analysis, reliability testing, and discriminant validity checks were administered. Empirical results indicated that the refined scale was both valid and reliable. Implications of these findings and direction for future research were also discussed.
Luana R. Almeida, , Ana Tereza Medeiros, Hemilio F. C. Coelho, Josemberg M. Andrade,
Computers in Entertainment, Volume 16, pp 1-13; https://doi.org/10.1145/3236493

Abstract:
This article presents the development issues and evaluation results of a serious game called Caixa de Pandora (Pandora's Box, in English), developed to train health professionals to care for women in situations of domestic violence. The combat of violence against women in the health sector presupposes a change of attitudes with respect to identified cases, with the exclusion of discriminatory and oppressive practices on the part of care professionals. To change these behaviors and verify postures, Caixa de Pandora uses an approach focused on the affective domain of learning. In the same sense of verifying and guiding changes in behavior, the intelligence module of the game used a model based on psychometric principles in its design. The validation of the game by a statistical sample with health professionals identified changes in their conceptions about the subject after playing the game, thereby demonstrating its pedagogical potential to formulate new knowledge and to change behavior.
Computers in Entertainment, Volume 16, pp 1-15; https://doi.org/10.1145/3236496

Abstract:
This research investigates the relationship between mindfulness and digital games, by identifying which aspects of mindfulness can be trained by digital games and which game elements influence factors of mindfulness. Games and interactive approaches with research evidence for their efficacy are presented for each individual mindfulness factor, as defined by the CHIME eight-factor model of mindfulness. Two experiments were conducted to validate whether games can improve mindfulness. First, an expert review was conducted, where domain experts rated the fit of games to their associated mindfulness factor. Second, a laboratory study tested the effect of games on mindfulness, revealing positive significant effects on state mindfulness. Elaborating on the research findings from all studies, a framework is proposed to inform the design of digital games for improving mindfulness, and implications plus limitations are discussed.
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